2012 September » ADL Blogs
September 20, 2012 0

Chicago Teen Arrested For “Violent Jihad” Bomb Plot

Adel Daoud Photo From Facebook

An 18-year-old Chicagoan was arrested last week by the FBI for attempt­ing to det­o­nate what he believed was a car bomb out­side a bar in down­town Chicago. The plot was appar­ently intended as retal­i­a­tion for America’s per­ceived war with Islam and “oppres­sion against Muslims.”

Adel Daoud was arrested after try­ing to set off a fake device set up by FBI agents as a part of a sting oper­a­tion. Fed­eral author­i­ties began mon­i­tor­ing Daoud in Octo­ber 2011, after dis­cov­er­ing his rad­i­cal posts on Jihadist Inter­net forums.

His online activ­ity included send­ing friends copies of Al Qaeda in the Ara­bian Peninsula’s English-language ter­ror­ist mag­a­zine, Inspire, in order to “brain­wash them.” On one online extrem­ist forum, Daoud described Inspire as “the best mag­a­zine I have read.”

He also shared recorded lec­tures by Anwar al-Awlaki, the American-born Mus­lim cleric killed in Yemen last year, and a video by Amer­i­can ter­ror­ist Omar Ham­mami, an Alabama native who became the pub­lic face and voice of Al Shabaab, the Al Qaeda affil­i­ate in Somalia.

Accord­ing to the FBI affi­davit, Daoud also used the inter­net to research jus­ti­fi­ca­tions for sui­cide bomb­ings and attacks on civil­ians. In May of this year, fed­eral author­i­ties began com­mu­ni­cat­ing with Daoud online and by July, under­cover agents were meet­ing with him in person.

Dur­ing the course of the FBI inves­ti­ga­tion, accord­ing to the affi­davit, Daoud expressed his desire to carry out attacks in the United States and to travel abroad to join ter­ror­ist groups over­seas, in par­tic­u­lar in Yemen. Daoud allegedly applied for a new pass­port in March 2012.

Before set­tling on the bar, Daoud pre­sented a list of pro­posed tar­gets, includ­ing mil­i­tary instil­la­tions, con­certs, malls and tourist attrac­tions. Accord­ing to a recorded con­ver­sa­tion with the under­cover agent, Daoud alluded to the fact that Mus­lims shouldn’t be at a bar, and if they are, they deserve what they get.

“I want [to do] some­thing that’s gonna make it in the news,” he said, accord­ing to the affi­davit. “If it’s only like five, ten peo­ple, I’m not gonna feel that good.”

One of Daoud’s friends was allegedly involved in the plot as well, but dropped out after being con­fronted by the sheikh at the mosque they attended.

Daoud has been charged with attempted use of a weapon of mass destruc­tion and an explo­sives vio­la­tion. He faces a max­i­mum pun­ish­ment of life in prison.

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September 20, 2012 6

One-Time Domestic Terrorist Now Leads White Supremacist Biker Gang

A wise man once said, “Old extrem­ists never die. They just change uniforms.”

That seems to be the case for long-time Illi­nois white suprema­cist Den­nis Michael McGif­fen.  In the 1990s, McGif­fen and other white suprema­cists (most asso­ci­ated with a Klan group or Aryan Nations) formed a group they dubbed The New Order, after the 1980s ter­ror­ist orga­ni­za­tion known as The Order.  In 1998, McGif­fen and five other mem­bers were arrested by the FBI on weapons and explo­sives charges in con­nec­tion with alleged plots to rob banks and armored cars, poi­son pub­lic water sup­plies, and to attack blacks, Jews, and civil rights orga­ni­za­tions.  Five of the defen­dants, includ­ing McGif­fen, pleaded guilty, while a sixth was con­victed in court.  McGif­fen received a seven-year prison sentence.

Now McGif­fen, 50 years old and liv­ing in Wood River, Illi­nois, has once again found a lead­er­ship role in the world of white supremacy. McGif­fen is pres­i­dent of the Sadis­tic Souls Motor­cy­cle Club (SS-MC), a white suprema­cist biker gang that started in 2010. In July 2012, the SS-MC for­mally merged with the neo-Nazi group Aryan Nations, with which McGif­fen has had past ties. 

The Sadis­tic Souls are a small Illinois-based gang with approx­i­mately two dozen mem­bers and asso­ciates.  The bulk of the mem­ber­ship comes from small towns out­side of East Saint Louis, such as Wood River, Edwardsville, Brighton, God­frey, Alton, and Jer­seyville.  The gang’s “col­ors” (i.e., the emblems they put on their vests and jack­ets) include a Totenkopf death’s head and SS light­ning bolts.  Most mem­bers have added an Aryan Nations patch to their colors. 

Since the merger, Aryan Nations has heav­ily pro­moted McGif­fen and the SS-MC, even “donat­ing” one of its reg­is­tered Web sites for the use of SS-MC. On that site, the SS-MC dubs the rela­tion­ship “a new begin­ning.”  The site sells SS-MC mer­chan­dise and also pro­motes the McGiffen-owned Peck­er­woods Gym and Fight Club.  Mor­ris Gulett, the cur­rent leader of Aryan Nations, is clearly stak­ing much on this rela­tion­ship, per­haps because of recent defections.

In April of this year, McGif­fen and fel­low Sadis­tic Soul Ryan R. Duck­ett were arrested by the Madi­son County Sheriff’s Depart­ment and charged with felony mob action for an alleged assault at a bar in God­frey, Illi­nois.  Both posted bond and were released.

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September 14, 2012 157

Anti-Muslim Christian Activists Responsible For Inflammatory “Innocence of Muslims” Film

The anti-Islam film that has sparked con­sid­er­able out­rage and vio­lence across the Mid­dle East and Islamic world appears to be a prod­uct of sev­eral Chris­t­ian anti-Muslim activists.

Although the false claim that the film Inno­cence of Mus­lims was the work of an “Israeli Jew” received wide­spread atten­tion in the U.S. and abroad, recent reports indi­cate that the film was cre­ated, pro­duced and pro­moted by indi­vid­u­als con­nected to a net­work of anti-Muslim organizations.

The film, which was pro­duced dur­ing the sum­mer of 2011 and por­trays the Prophet Muham­mad as a child-molester, homo­sex­ual and phi­lan­derer, was adver­tised in the Anaheim-based Arab World news­pa­per under its orig­i­nal title, The Inno­cence of Bin Laden. The adver­tise­ment described the movie as reveal­ing the true iden­tity of the ter­ror­ists behind the killing of Mus­lims in Pales­tine, Iraq and Afghanistan. The adver­tise­ment also indi­cated that the film would be shown dur­ing Ramadan, and pro­vided a screen­ing date of June 30 at the Vine The­atre in Los Angeles.

Nakoula Bas­se­ley Nakoula

Screen­shot of “Inno­cence of Muslims”

Nakoula Bas­se­ley Nakoula, a 55-year-old California-based Cop­tic Chris­t­ian, appears to be the one respon­si­ble for cre­at­ing the impres­sion that the film was cre­ated and sup­ported by Jews. Accord­ing to Amer­i­can offi­cials in an inter­view with the Arabic-language tele­vi­sion sta­tion Al Hurra, Nakoula is the alleged pro­ducer and film­maker of the anti-Islam film. Nakoula ini­tially exposed his role to inter­na­tional media under the pseu­do­nym Sam Bacile, a fic­ti­tious indi­vid­ual that the Asso­ci­ated Press had ini­tially reported was “an Israeli film­maker based in Cal­i­for­nia.” In the inter­view with the AP, Nakoula, speak­ing under a pseu­do­nym, said the film cost $5 mil­lion to make “and was financed with the help of more than 100 Jew­ish donors.” These claims have since been dis­proved with the rev­e­la­tion that Sam Bacile does not exist.

Joseph Nas­ralla

Joseph Nas­ralla with Pamela Geller

Nas­ralla is a self-described “Cop­tic Chris­t­ian activist from Egypt” and founder of the California-based The Way TV, a satel­lite tele­vi­sion sta­tion devoted to mat­ters con­cern­ing Egypt’s Cop­tic com­mu­nity. He is also the founder and chief exec­u­tive of the California-based Media for Christ, the con­ser­v­a­tive Chris­t­ian pro­duc­tion com­pany report­edly respon­si­ble for pro­duc­ing Inno­cence of Mus­lims. Nas­ralla is con­nected to promi­nent anti-Muslim activists Pamela Geller and Robert Spencer and their con­spir­a­to­r­ial anti-Muslim orga­ni­za­tion, Stop Islamiza­tion of Amer­ica (SIOA). Accord­ing to Geller, Nas­ralla popped onto her radar fol­low­ing his atten­dance at the SIOA’s June 6, 2010 “D-Day Rally” in front of the pro­posed Islamic cen­ter in lower Man­hat­tan. In a let­ter addressed to Geller and Spencer fol­low­ing the rally, Nas­ralla described him­self as a refugee from “the oppres­sion of Islam” and said that he seeks to “expose to the Amer­i­can pub­lic what kind of insti­ga­tion we [Cop­tic Chris­tians] suf­fered at the hands of hate­ful Mus­lim preach­ers…” Since 2010, Nas­ralla has been invited to speak at var­i­ous SIOA events, includ­ing at SIOA’s 2010 and 2011 Sep­tem­ber 11 ral­lies in New York.

Mor­ris Sadek

Mor­ris Sadek with Terry Jones

Sadek, head of the U.S.-based National Cop­tic Assem­bly, an anti-Muslim orga­ni­za­tion that claims to rep­re­sent and speak on behalf of Egypt­ian Chris­t­ian Copts, was instru­men­tal in the film’s acces­si­bil­ity to the Arabic-speaking world. Sadek released the 14-minute trailer of the film on YouTube on Sep­tem­ber 5 with Ara­bic sub­ti­tles. Sadek claims to be the pres­i­dent of a Cop­tic state in Egypt and asserts that this inde­pen­dent Cop­tic state is under the occu­pa­tion of “Arab Mus­lim invaders.” Accord­ing to Sadek’s web­site, he fre­quently writes let­ters to Israeli lead­ers appeal­ing for their assis­tance in “lib­er­at­ing the Cop­tic state.” He also has a work­ing rela­tion­ship with con­tro­ver­sial Qur’an burn­ing Pas­tor Terry Jones of the Dove World Out­reach Cen­ter and has par­tic­i­pated in demon­stra­tions held by Jones and his church. On his per­sonal web­site, Sadek has voiced his sup­port for Jones’ dis­taste­ful mock­ery of the Prophet Muham­mad. Sadek also attended the 2010 ACT! for Amer­ica National Con­fer­ence. ACT! pro­motes the idea that Islam is a back­ward and sedi­tious polit­i­cal ide­ol­ogy and that Mus­lim immi­gra­tion to the U.S. must end.

Steve Klein

Steve Klein

Steve Klein is a California-based anti-Muslim Chris­t­ian activist and for­mer U.S. Marine who claims that he pro­vided con­sult­ing ser­vices for the pro­duc­tion of Inno­cence of Mus­lims. In a recent inter­view fol­low­ing the out­break of vio­lence in Cairo and Beng­hazi, Klein described the film as being designed to spark out­rage. In addi­tion to his alleged role in the film’s tech­ni­cal pro­duc­tion, Klein is founder and board mem­ber of Coura­geous Chris­tians United (CCU), an orga­ni­za­tion that protests out­side of mosques, abor­tion clin­ics and Mor­mon tem­ples. CCU issued a state­ment today denounc­ing the film and indi­cat­ing that Klein had been removed from the board. Many of the links on the group’s web­site redi­rect read­ers to sites designed to con­vince Mus­lims, Mor­mons or Jehovah’s Wit­nesses to con­vert to Chris­tian­ity. Klein is also the founder of Con­cerned Cit­i­zens for the First Amend­ment (CCFA), an anti-Muslim group whose pri­mary ini­tia­tive is to warn high school stu­dents that they are being brain­washed through courses and les­son on Islamic his­tory. He has spo­ken at con­fer­ences on the sub­ject of Islam at the Church at Kaweah, a mil­i­tant Chris­t­ian church base in California.

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