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October 2, 2014 2

American Racist Group Will Hold Meeting in Hungary Despite Ban

richard-spencer-at-npi-podium

Richard Spencer at National Pol­icy Institute

Update — 10/06/14: On Octo­ber 3, Hun­gar­ian police arrested National Pol­icy Insti­tute (NPI) head Richard Spencer for not hav­ing iden­ti­fi­ca­tion papers with him at an infor­mal gath­er­ing of peo­ple who had planned to attend NPI’s con­fer­ence in Budapest. Jared Tay­lor, work­ing with oth­ers, held an NPI meet­ing at a restau­rant in Budapest where he and Tom Sunic spoke to about 75 peo­ple. Spencer is expected to be deported from Hun­gary today.


Richard Spencer
, the head of the National Pol­icy Insti­tute (NPI), a white suprema­cist think tank based in White­fish, Mon­tana, asserts that his group will still hold a meet­ing in Budapest on Octo­ber 3–5, despite the Hun­gar­ian government’s ban on the con­fer­ence. In addi­tion, the venue in Hun­gary where the con­fer­ence was to be held has report­edly can­celled its con­tract with NPI organizers.

Per­versely invok­ing the civil rights anthem, “We shall over­come,” Spencer declared to sup­port­ers in an email that NPI would per­se­vere and that peo­ple plan­ning to attend would still be able to meet and exchange ideas. Spencer usu­ally holds NPI con­fer­ences in Wash­ing­ton, DC where he reg­u­larly invites Euro­pean and Amer­i­can racists to share their ideas about white nation­al­ism in Europe and the U.S.

Spencer, 36, is the new face of white supremacy who over­sees a num­ber of projects in addi­tion to NPI. He cre­ated an online jour­nal Radix, which fea­tures the work of intel­lec­tual racists and runs Wash­ing­ton Sum­mit Pub­lish­ers, which pub­lishes racist tracts. Prior to openly embrac­ing white nation­al­ism in 2009, he worked at the Amer­i­can Spec­ta­tor, a main­stream con­ser­v­a­tive mag­a­zine. In 2010, he founded Alter­na­tive Right, a white suprema­cist online jour­nal, which cur­tailed oper­a­tions in Decem­ber 2013.

In a 2011 inter­view, Spencer said, “By 2009, I was much more will­ing to express hereti­cal views on race and egal­i­tar­i­an­ism, as well as write more forth­rightly on cul­ture.” Spencer has advo­cated for a white ethno-state in the U.S. In 2011, he became the head of NPI and his annual con­fer­ences have attracted dozens of attend­ing, includ­ing a num­ber of young people.

The con­fer­ence in Hun­gary was sched­uled to fea­ture a num­ber of other Amer­i­cans includ­ing Jared Tay­lor, head of the white suprema­cist jour­nal Amer­i­can Renais­sance and John Mor­gan, an Amer­i­can who heads Ark­tos Media, based in Budapest. Ark­tos, a co-sponsor of the NPI con­fer­ence, pub­lishes books that pro­mote the Iden­ti­tar­ian move­ment in Europe. Iden­ti­tar­ian groups are pro-white, anti-immigrant and stress racial/ethnic iden­tity. Tom Sunic, who is Croa­t­ian and a leader in Amer­i­can Free­dom Party (for­merly known as Amer­i­can Third Posi­tion), was also sched­uled to address the NPI gath­er­ing. The Amer­i­can Free­dom Party is a white suprema­cist polit­i­cal party that runs extrem­ist can­di­dates in the U.S. Other speak­ers included Mar­ton Gyongyosi, a leader in the ultra­na­tion­al­ist Hun­gar­ian party Job­bik, who has since report­edly bowed out of the NPI event and Alexan­der Dugin, a Russ­ian ultra­na­tion­al­ist ideologue.

The con­fer­ence would build fur­ther ties between Amer­i­can and Euro­pean racists and nation­al­ists and exploit ris­ing ultra­na­tion­al­ist sen­ti­ment in Hun­gary as evi­denced by Jobbik’s elec­toral gains in the April 2014 elections.

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September 16, 2014 0

From The Archives: Violence Against Women Act 20 Years Later

Twenty years ago, on Sep­tem­ber 13, 1994, Pres­i­dent Clin­ton signed the Vio­lence Against Women Act (VAWA), a law which reflects a core part of ADL’s mis­sion: the pre­ven­tion of bias-motivated crim­i­nal behav­ior. VAWA autho­rized gov­ern­ment action to improve crim­i­nal jus­tice and com­mu­nity responses to domes­tic and sex­ual vio­lence and pro­vided fund­ing for the estab­lish­ment of the National Domes­tic Vio­lence Hot­line. ADL’s sup­port for the law, which aimed to pro­tect women from vio­lence directed against them because of their gen­der, was a nat­ural exten­sion of its work on hate crimes. pres-clinton-bill-signing-1994-09-13

In 1996, two years after VAWA’s enact­ment, ADL added gen­der to its model hate crimes leg­is­la­tion, cit­ing the fact that gender-based hate crimes could not be eas­ily dis­tin­guished from other forms of hate-motivated vio­lence. In response to legal chal­lenges to VAWA fol­low­ing its enact­ment, ADL joined sev­eral ami­cus (friend of the court) briefs in sup­port of the Act. In 2000, in U.S. v. Mor­ri­son, ADL, along with a num­ber of other civil rights orga­ni­za­tions includ­ing Peo­ple for the Amer­i­can Way, the Amer­i­can Jew­ish Con­gress, and Hadas­sah, filed an ami­cus brief sup­port­ing the con­sti­tu­tion­al­ity of VAWA’s civil rem­edy pro­vi­sion, which allowed sur­vivors of gender-motivated vio­lence to sue their attack­ers in fed­eral court.

Fol­low­ing the Court’s deci­sion to strike down the civil rem­edy pro­vi­sion, ADL con­tin­ued its sup­port for leg­is­la­tion that coun­ters dis­crim­i­na­tion and bias crimes—including on the basis of gen­der or gen­der iden­tity. In 2009, Con­gress enacted the Matthew Shep­ard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Pre­ven­tion Act crim­i­nal­iz­ing hate crimes tar­get­ing vic­tims because of race, color, reli­gion, national ori­gin, gen­der, sex­ual ori­en­ta­tion, gen­der iden­tity or dis­abil­ity.  ADL spear­headed coali­tion efforts to pass the bill for more than a decade.

After fail­ing to reau­tho­rize an update to VAWA in 2012, Con­gress enacted new leg­is­la­tion in 2013, which included addi­tional pro­grams specif­i­cally designed to address domes­tic vio­lence against women of color, Native Amer­i­cans, new cam­pus hate crime require­ments, and inti­mate part­ner vio­lence involv­ing mem­bers of the LGBT community.

On this impor­tant anniver­sary, ADL reaf­firms its long-standing com­mit­ment to advo­cat­ing for legally-sound statutes at the fed­eral and state level that counter dis­crim­i­na­tion, bias crimes, and vio­lence against women.

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September 12, 2014 0

Anti-Immigrant Groups Attempt To Bring ISIS Into The Immigration Debate

anti-immigrant-islamIn response to the atroc­i­ties com­mit­ted in the Mid­dle East by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), a ter­ror­ist group, Amer­i­can anti-immigrant groups are attempt­ing to exploit the public’s legit­i­mate con­cerns about ISIS by warn­ing that the group plans to enter the United States via Mexico.

In a blog posted on Sep­tem­ber 8, a fel­low for the anti-immigrant think tank Cen­ter for Immi­gra­tion Stud­ies (CIS) argued that Sen­a­tor John McCain’s sup­port of the Senate’s immi­gra­tion reform bill S-744 in 2013, “has pro­vided ISIS with unfet­tered access to the United States for both its per­son­nel and their weapons of death and destruc­tion.” The blog con­cluded with the state­ment, “Should ISIS or some other ter­ror­ist group take advan­tage of McCain’s wel­come mat, he will only have him­self to blame as he goes in the eyes of many from war hero to collaborator.”

The anti-immigrant grass­roots orga­ni­za­tion Num­ber­sUSA and the California-based Cal­i­for­ni­ans for Pop­u­la­tion Sta­bi­liza­tion (CAPS) both sent fundrais­ing emails to activists in recent weeks link­ing ISIS to Pres­i­dent Obama’s rumored announce­ment of some form of exec­u­tive relief for undoc­u­mented immi­grants. Num­ber­sUSA claimed ISIS, “is cer­tainly encour­aged by the weak U.S. gov­ern­ment response to the bor­der surge this sum­mer…” A num­ber of state-based anti-immigrant groups also warned of the threat of ISIS ter­ror­ists enter­ing the U.S. via Mex­ico. Many of the groups cite a report from the conspiracy-orientated “watch­dog” group Judi­cial Watch. Judi­cial Watch is closely aligned with the anti-immigrant movement.

Some anti-immigrant groups are also respond­ing to the media spot­light on ISIS by espous­ing anti-Muslim rhetoric. In a Face­book post on Sep­tem­ber 9, the Tea Party Immi­gra­tion Coali­tion headed by racist Rick Olt­man asserted, “We must rethink the 1st amend­ment as it applies to Islam. Islam is NOT a reli­gion; rather, it is a supra­na­tional orga­ni­za­tion hell bent on world dom­i­na­tion and killing any­one, any­where and at any time to do so.”

The anti-immigrant move­ment often attempts to tie together the issues of immi­gra­tion and ter­ror­ism. This was the case even before the Sep­tem­ber 11, 2001 ter­ror­ist attacks. Since 9–11, the move­ment has con­cen­trated on link­ing ter­ror­ism and immi­gra­tion under the guise of national secu­rity. This is a key argu­ment for the move­ment in oppo­si­tion to any form of immi­gra­tion reform.

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