Extremism & Terrorism » ADL Blogs
January 27, 2016 0

Oregon Standoff: Developments

  • On Jan­u­ary 2, a loosely orga­nized group of armed anti-government extrem­ists led by Ammon Bundy seized con­trol of the Mal­heur National Wildlife Refuge head­quar­ters build­ings located near the town of Burns in remote south­east­ern Ore­gon.  They later named them­selves Cit­i­zens for Con­sti­tu­tional Freedom.oregon-standoff-arrest
  • On Tues­day, Jan­u­ary 26, Ammon Bundy and sev­eral oth­ers were arrested by fed­eral and state law enforce­ment offi­cers dur­ing a traf­fic stop near John Day, Ore­gon. LaVoy Finicum, who served as a spokesman for the group, was killed dur­ing the arrest; another occu­pier was slightly injured.  Two oth­ers were arrested in Burns, Ore­gon, while another occu­pier turned him­self in to author­i­ties in Arizona.
  • Those arrested so far include Ammon Bundy, Ryan Bundy, Shawna Cox, Brian Cav­a­lier, Pete San­tilli, Joseph O’Shaughnessy, Ryan Payne, and Jon Ritzheimer. For back­ground infor­ma­tion on all of the occu­piers who were arrested or killed, as well as many of the other remain­ing occu­piers and allies who has been at the wildlife refuge head­quar­ters, see: The Occu­piers of the Mal­heur National Wildlife Refuge Head­quar­ters.
  • Although some occu­piers have report­edly left the Mal­heur refuge head­quar­ters, oth­ers remain.

LATEST UPDATES

4:15 PM (EST) oregon call to violenceOccu­pier Sean Ander­son cradling an assault rifle and urg­ing peo­ple to come to the Mal­heur National Wildlife Refuge appeared on a YouTube live stream ear­lier today and said: “There are no laws in this United States now. This is a free for all Armaged­don. Any leo, or mil­i­tary, or law enforce­ment, or feds, that stand up and fuck their oath, don’t abide by their oath are the enemy. If they stop you from get­ting here … KILL THEM!”

3:23 PM (EST) Dave Fry, an Ohio res­i­dent still occu­py­ing the wildlife refuge after the arrests of sev­eral cohorts yes­ter­day made anti-Semitic com­ments in his live feed at the refuge. Fry spoke about “fake Jews,” a term used by a num­ber of white suprema­cists and con­spir­acy the­o­rists who believe that many peo­ple who call them­selves Jews today are not truly Jew­ish but are descended from a race of peo­ple called the Khaz­ars.  Drum­ming up anti-Semitic myths, Fry claimed that “fake Jews” believe “they’re supe­rior to peo­ple,” are “evil” and “do a lot of evil things with their money.”

3:10 PM (EST) Occu­pier Vic­to­ria Sharp’s audio account claim­ing LaVoy Finicum was mur­dered has been shared nearly 3,500 times on Face­book alone, leav­ing aside other places, as extrem­ists attempt to turn Finicum into a mar­tyr for the anti-government causes.

1:31 PM (EST) Occu­piers at the Mal­heur National Wildlife Refuge have begun using heavy machin­ery — appar­ently either to dig a trench or to build an earthen bar­rier, pre­sum­ably to impede entry.

1:26 PM (EST): The cur­rent leader of the Ore­gon stand­off appears to be Jason Patrick, who took over the role from Blaine Cooper early Wednes­day. Patrick, who was at the Bundy Ranch in 2014, is an anti-government extrem­ist and Three Per­center known in his home state of Geor­gia for his out­bursts against law enforce­ment and court per­son­nel, and for his attempts to bring video cam­eras into courtrooms.

12:51 PM (EST): React­ing to the evolv­ing sit­u­a­tion in Ore­gon, the anti-government extrem­ist Pacific Patri­ots Net­work issued a “Stand By” order to their mem­bers and fol­low­ers. “Cooler heads must pre­vail,” they announced. “We do not wish to inflame the cur­rent sit­u­a­tion and will engage in open dia­logue until all the facts have been gath­ered.” Based on pre­vi­ous, sim­i­lar inci­dents, this is the expected response from most orga­nized groups, who tend to under­stand the futil­ity of engag­ing the fed­eral government’s fire­power. Indi­vid­u­als tend to be more volatile (and less pre­dictable) in these situations.

12:28 PM (EST): Right-wing talk show host Glenn Beck issued a state­ment on Face­book Wednes­day morn­ing, writ­ing that he was “deeply sad­dened by the loss of life” in Ore­gon, but that the pro­test­ers at Mal­heur should not have been armed. Because they were so vocal about their com­mit­ment to using vio­lence, as nec­es­sary, to defend their beliefs, Beck argues, “The[ir] cause was lost before it began.”

11:52 AM (EST): As ten­sions increase, so too does the appar­ent rhetoric by some of the stand­off par­tic­i­pants. Dur­ing a live feed of the stand­off on YouTube, a male can clearly be heard say­ing “There will be a shootout… None of them are safe. When I get outta here, I’m gonna hunt them down!”

11:45 AM (EST): Michele Fiore, a Nevada state assem­bly per­son, has taken to Twit­ter to repeat the extrem­ist claim that LaVoy Finicum was mur­dered by the gov­ern­ment. Fiore is an ally of Cliven Bundy, the anti-government extrem­ist whose stand­off with author­i­ties in 2014 in Nevada inspired his sons to seize the wildlife refuge in Oregon.

11:31 AM (EST): Sup­port­ers of the siege at wildlife refuge in Ore­gon, includ­ing Twit­ter users as well as wlavoy memehite suprema­cists on Storm­front , are cir­cu­lat­ing an image of LaVoy Finicum in an attempt to turn the extrem­ist into a right-wing mar­tyr. Finicum allegedly was killed while charg­ing law enforce­ment offi­cers who were attempt­ing to arrest Finicum and other occu­piers. The meme repeats an extrem­ist claim cir­cu­lat­ing on the Inter­net that Finicum was mur­dered while unarmed and with his hands in the air.

11:20 AM (EST): The remain­ing extrem­ists at the Mal­heur National Wildlife Refuge stand­off are still defi­ant and  not ready to sur­ren­der to author­i­ties. Duane Ehmer of Irrigon, Ore­gon, and off and on par­tic­i­pant in the stand­off, said on Face­book that “now the wolves are at the gate, Were [sic] are those Oath keep­ers.” He is refer­ring to the anti-government extrem­ist group that often injects itself into con­flicts. More infor­ma­tion on the Oath Keep­ers.

10:17 AM (EST): Some anti-government extrem­ists are already attempt­ing to por­tray Finicum as a mar­tyr; the risk of retal­i­a­tion by anti-government extrem­ists, locally or else­where, against the fed­eral gov­ern­ment is fairly substantial.

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January 26, 2016 3

Failed White Supremacist Leaders Form New Christian Identity Group

Two lead­ers of the white suprema­cist move­ment, Paul Mul­let of Bain­bridge, Ohio, and Billy Roper of Moun­tain View, Arkansas, have joined forces to form a new group, Divine Truth Min­istries and its “polit­i­cal arm,” the Nation of True Israel.  Both men have strug­gled for years to estab­lish them­selves in the move­ment and to recruit followers.

Mul­let and Roper prac­tice Chris­t­ian Iden­tity, a vir­u­lently racist and anti-Semitic reli­gion. They believe not only that whites of Euro­pean descent can be traced back to the “Lost Tribes of Israel,” but that Jews descended from a union between Eve and Satan. In addi­tion to their Chris­t­ian Iden­tity beliefs, both men have embraced neo-Nazi ideology.

Symbol of Divine Truth Ministries, left, and Aryan Nations, right

Sym­bol of Divine Truth Min­istries, left, and Aryan Nations, right

A late Decem­ber press release by Roper announced they were “car­ry­ing for­ward the ideals and val­ues of Aryan Nations under a new ban­ner.” In the 1990s, Aryan Nations was one of the largest and most active neo-Nazi groups in the coun­try, as well as a major Chris­t­ian Iden­tity group.

Pre­sum­ably Mul­let and Roper hope to cap­i­tal­ize on the small void left by the recent dis­so­lu­tion of Mor­ris Gulett’s Louisiana-based fac­tion of Aryan Nations. Gulett’s group was one of a num­ber of fac­tions that formed after the 2004 death of Richard But­ler, the founder of Aryan Nations.

It is no sur­prise that Mul­let and Roper’s first course of busi­ness has been to demo­nize Dr. Mar­tin Luther King, Jr. Ear­lier this month, just days before the fed­eral hol­i­day mark­ing Dr. King’s birth­day, they spon­sored a “Day of Edu­ca­tion,” which encour­aged all “white nation­al­ists” to dis­trib­ute anti-King fly­ers and lit­er­a­ture alleg­ing that King, among other things, was a pla­gia­rist and communist.

They are also orga­niz­ing an April march at Georgia’s Stone Moun­tain Park to protest leg­is­la­tion that would allow changes to exist­ing Con­fed­er­ate dis­plays and mon­u­ments, as well as a plan by the Stone Moun­tain Memo­r­ial Asso­ci­a­tion to install a mon­u­ment in King’s honor. Fol­low­ing the march, they are also plan­ning a white power music event at a dif­fer­ent venue.

Despite their ide­o­log­i­cal begin­nings with promi­nent neo-Nazi groups, Mul­let and Roper, just a year apart in age, have strug­gled to make their mark in the white suprema­cist world. Mul­let started with Richard Butler’s Aryan Nations, while Roper, who came from a fam­ily of Klans­men, got his start with William Pierce and the National Alliance. In the early 2000s, But­ler and Pierce died, leav­ing the neo-Nazi move­ment in dis­ar­ray and both Mul­let and Roper untethered.

Shortly after Pierce’s death, Roper, forced out by the remain­ing lead­ers of the National Alliance, started his own neo-Nazi group, White Rev­o­lu­tion. Despite years of effort, White Rev­o­lu­tion never amounted to any­thing more than a tiny pro­pa­ganda group and Roper shut it down in 2011. For the last sev­eral years, Roper was active with Thomas Robb’s Arkansas-based Klan group, the Knights Party.

Mul­let also expe­ri­enced fail­ures as he attempted to start sev­eral neo-Nazi and Chris­t­ian Iden­tity groups in the years fol­low­ing Butler’s death. His worst loss came in 2011 when Mor­ris Gulett usurped a fac­tion of the Aryan Nations that Mul­let had founded in 2009. In 2011, Mul­let attempted a come­back with the Amer­i­can National Social­ist Party, but it also failed.

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January 14, 2016 5

White Supremacist Backing Trump Has Ties to Hardcore Racists

William John­son, the head of the white suprema­cist Amer­i­can Free­dom Party (AFP), has paid for a series of robo­calls and radio time in Iowa in sup­port of Don­ald Trump’s can­di­dacy. In a recent inter­view on CNN, Trump dis­avowed the robo­calls but said that “peo­ple are angry at what’s going on.”

On the calls, John­son urges peo­ple to sup­port Trump while refer­ring to  him­self as a farmer and a white nation­al­ist. The calls also include a pitch for Trump from another white suprema­cist, Jared Tay­lor, who runs the Amer­i­can Renais­sance web­site. The site fea­tures arti­cles that pur­port to demon­strate the intel­lec­tual and cul­tural supe­ri­or­ity of whites.

William Johnson

William John­son

While John­son projects a suit and tie image as a lawyer and activist, he has long courted the more hard­core mem­bers of the white suprema­cist move­ment. This past sum­mer, he was a speaker at Camp Com­radery 2015, a white suprema­cist event in Bak­ers­field, Cal­i­for­nia, that included racist skin­heads from var­i­ous groups, includ­ing Blood and Honor, Golden State Skin­heads and Cal­i­for­nia Skinheads.

At the event, John­son encour­aged atten­dees to run for polit­i­cal office and to pro­mote a pro-white mes­sage to the public.

Another speaker at the event was Matthew Heim­bach, the founder of the white suprema­cist Tra­di­tion­al­ist Youth Net­work, and a vir­u­lent anti-Semite. At the event, Heim­bach gave a speech blam­ing Jews for destroy­ing the white race.

In Feb­ru­ary 2012, John­son attended a demon­stra­tion in Los Ange­les for the South Africa Project, a national ini­tia­tive to advo­cate against alleged white geno­cide in South Africa. A num­ber of racist skin­heads par­tic­i­pated in the event.

For years, John­son has pro­moted the idea of a white ethno-state in Amer­ica. In the 1980s, John­son, under the pseu­do­nym “James O. Pace,” pro­moted a scheme called the “Pace Amend­ment” to a vari­ety of peo­ple, includ­ing mem­bers of the U.S. Con­gress and state legislatures.

The Pace Amend­ment would have elim­i­nated the Four­teenth Amend­ment (which grants auto­matic cit­i­zen­ship to any­one born in the United States) and lim­ited cit­i­zen­ship only to “non-Hispanic whites of the Euro­pean race, in whom there is no ascer­tain­able trace of Negro Blood, nor more than one-eighth Mon­go­lian, Asian, Asia Minor, Mid­dle East­ern, Semitic, Near East­ern, Amer­i­can Indian, Malay or other non-European or non-white blood.” Those who did not fit this cat­e­gory, includ­ing Jews, would be repa­tri­ated to places deemed their coun­tries of origin.

A 1987 ADL report on the Pace Amend­ment iden­ti­fied ties between John­son and a range of neo-Nazi orga­ni­za­tions and lead­ers, includ­ing the now-deceased Richard But­ler, then leader of the neo-Nazi group Aryan Nations; Dan Gay­man, a leader in the white suprema­cist Chris­t­ian Iden­tity move­ment; and Tom Met­zger, who was closely aligned with the racist skin­head move­ment in the 1980s and 1990s. John­son is also a long-time asso­ciate of Klan leader Thom Robb and has been a guest speaker at Robb’s events.

While John­son is pur­port­edly try­ing to reach out to dis­af­fected whites on behalf of Trump, he pre­sum­ably would like to win those same peo­ple over to his white suprema­cist ideology.

 

As a 501(c )(3) non-profit orga­ni­za­tion, the Anti-Defamation League does not sup­port or oppose can­di­dates for polit­i­cal office.

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