Extremism & Terrorism » ADL Blogs
November 25, 2014 0

Music Videos Enhance Violent Anti-Jewish Messages Online

Songs and music videos using the recent wave of ter­ror­ist attacks in Israel to glo­rify the attacks and encour­age more vio­lence are part of a larger online phe­nom­e­non where indi­vid­u­als cel­e­brate and pro­mote ter­ror­ism through pop­u­lar memes, graph­ics and videos.

Screenshot from "Runaway oh Zionist"

Screen­shot from “Run­away oh Zionist”

An ani­mated music video uploaded to YouTube on Novem­ber 18 called “Run­away oh Zion­ist” is an explicit ref­er­ence to the recent “run-over” car attacks in Israel.The song, pre­formed in Hebrew with Ara­bic and Hebrew sub­ti­tles, says, “Run­away oh you Zion­ist, Runaway…Minutes, and a car will run over you” and depicts a Jew­ish man singing about run­ning away from cars. In the part of the video where the Jew­ish man gets hit by a car at a bus sta­tion and thrown into a ceme­tery, the lyrics are, “A car will attack you from each direc­tion to give you a ride to the grave.” The song closes with “Run­away Zion­ists because you will be killed by all means.”

The video, which has received more than 98,000 views, was praised by Hezbollah’s media arm, Al Manar which stated, “the melody of this short video is very apt, and the ani­ma­tion is highly pro­fes­sional which indi­cates a qual­ity boom for the ‘resis­tance’ art in the Occu­pied Ter­ri­tory [Palestine].”

Another song cir­cu­lat­ing online titled “Run-over this set­tler” is per­formed by a Pales­tin­ian duo. The song includes the lyrics “Pre­pare your ambush on the road, run-over them; may god help you.” It also praises Abdul­rah­man al-Shaloudi, the ter­ror­ist who rammed his car into a group of Israeli pedes­tri­ans last month, killing a baby and a young woman. One lyric says that he “Ran-over a Jew­ish settler…did it, with his lim­ited resources, for his coun­try.” The lyrics also callupon Pales­tini­ans to “wait for them at the inter­sec­tion, let the set­tler sink in the red blood. Ter­rify them don’t be mer­ci­ful.” Jordan-based Al Yarmuk satel­lite TV sta­tion aired the song on its chan­nel as well.

Var­i­ous YouTube users have cre­ated their own videos and made use of this song as well, bring­ing the total num­ber of views for this song to more than 260,000.

Sim­i­lar user gen­er­ated con­tent began cir­cu­lat­ing online within min­utes of the bru­tal ter­ror attack that killed five peo­ple in a Jerusalem syn­a­gogue. In addi­tion to those images and car­toons glo­ri­fy­ing the attack, another song, titled “The one who knocks the door will hear the answer” was uploaded to YouTube by the pop­u­lar Pales­tin­ian singer Qasim Al-Najar. The song received more than 154,000 views in the first sev­eral days. The song’s lyrics urge Israeli Prime Min­is­ter Netanyahu “to col­lect his Rab­bis,” warn­ing that when Jerusalem revolts it will slaugh­ter the settlers.

The Pop­u­lar Front for the Lib­er­a­tion of Pales­tine, which claimed respon­si­bil­ity for the Syn­a­gogue attack, also released a video on YouTube titled “With a butcher’s knife, a gun, and an Iron will.” The song says “oh set­tler, this is your destiny…your death is inevitable.” The song also praises the Pop­u­lar Front and describes its mem­bers as “walk­ing in defi­ance over death and slaugh­ter­ing them [Israelis] like sheep.”

The PFLP’s song has attracted only 5,800 view­ers on YouTube, which fur­ther attests to the sig­nif­i­cance of user gen­er­ated con­tent to spread mes­sages of vio­lence and anti-Semitism.

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November 24, 2014 2

Members Of New Black Panther Party Arrested On Weapons Charges

olajuwon-ali-black-panther-bombjpg

Ola­ju­won Ali, Chair­man of the New Black Pan­ther Party’s St. Louis Chapter

Two mem­bers of the New Black Pan­ther Party (NBPP), the largest orga­nized anti-Semitic and racist Black mil­i­tant group in Amer­ica, were arrested in Mis­souri on Fri­day and charged with fed­eral firearms offenses.

Ola­ju­won Ali, Chair­man of the NBPP St. Louis Chap­ter, and Bran­don Bald­win, were indicted on fed­eral weapons vio­la­tions for allegedly mak­ing straw pur­chases of two .45 cal­iber hand­guns at a sport­ing goods store in Hazel­wood, Mis­souri. Author­i­ties say that the two men claimed the guns were for Bald­win but that the weapons were actu­ally intended for some­one else.

After exe­cut­ing search war­rants, pros­e­cu­tors are report­edly con­sid­er­ing addi­tional charges against the two for attempt­ing to pur­chase pipe bombs with intent to cause dam­age to build­ings and land­marks in the St. Louis area.

A state­ment posted by Ali on his appar­ent Face­book page sug­gests that he may have antic­i­pated his arrest on Fri­day. On Novem­ber 19, Ali posted, “Fam­ily and Friends, every­day I got Cau­casians fol­low­ing me in SUV trucks. Please be advised that if you show any signs of non­com­pli­ance with this Devil they will try to assas­si­nate you. Lord smite my ene­mies and any­one who intends to bring me harm. Ashe! In the spirit of Ogun! Pro­tect me. Ashe!”

In another post, Ali described St. Louis as a “Slave Cap­i­tal in a Slave State!” and the iconic Arch as “the Shackle of Oppres­sion” and a “Sym­bol of Our destruc­tion and demise.”

Ali is also an actor and rap­per; he posted images of him­self in a new music video called “Right To Resist” on the day of his arrest. Ali appar­ently con­verted to Islam in col­lege, accord­ing to a YouTube video he posted in Octo­ber 2012, although it is unclear if he still con­sid­ers him­self a Mus­lim. In August, Ali and other mem­bers of the NBPP were present in Fer­gu­son dur­ing the protests fol­lowed the shoot­ing of Michael Brown. It is unclear when Ali, who has a back tat­too of a black pan­ther attack­ing a bald eagle, joined the NBPP.

In addi­tion to his con­nec­tion to the NBPP, Ali is also involved with another extrem­ist move­ment, the “Moor­ish” move­ment, an off­shoot of the anti-government sov­er­eign cit­i­zen move­ment, which he joined in early 2013.  This involve­ment resulted in his arrest by St. Louis police in June 2013, when Ali, accord­ing to his own account of the inci­dent, was charged with tres­pass­ing, dis­turb­ing the peace and resist­ing arrest after attempt­ing to use a Moor­ish iden­ti­fi­ca­tion card to make a “tax free” pur­chase at a con­ve­nience store.

Source: Facebook

Source: Face­book

Ali, who was tased dur­ing the encounter, described him­self as a “vic­tim of police bru­tal­ity” and referred to police as “out­laws” and “mer­ce­nar­ies for hire.”  Ali claims to have reached out for help to other “abo­rig­i­nal indige­nous” peo­ple (i.e., other Moor­ish sov­er­eign cit­i­zens), but to have received only advice and good wishes.

Bran­don Muham­mad has a less exten­sive online foot­print. On his appar­ent Face­book page, he made cryp­tic com­ments on Novem­ber 17 such as “For every action there is a reaction…brother I can elab­o­rate on that trust me.” Many of his “likes” con­sist of var­i­ous pages related to Islam, the Nation of Islam, the New Black Pan­ther Party, the Black Rid­ers Lib­er­a­tion Party, the African-American Defense League, and other Black nation­al­ist indi­vid­u­als, causes, and groups.

The NBPP issued a state­ment on its blog on Fri­day describ­ing the alle­ga­tions against Ali and Bald­win as “a com­plete BOLF FACED LIE and FRAME UP attempt of the local St. Louis orga­ni­za­tion and mem­ber­ship, in an effort to stop the orga­niz­ing capa­bil­ity of the local party.”

The NBPP often attracts atten­tion for its threats against police, which the NBPP views as cul­pa­ble for Black suf­fer­ing in the U.S. In August, ADL expressed con­cern over the group’s efforts to por­tray itself as help­ing to keep the peace between pro­test­ers and law enforce­ment in the after­math of the shoot­ing of Michael Brown in Fer­gu­son, Mis­souri. The group made sev­eral threats against local law enforce­ment in response to the Michael Brown shoot­ing in Fer­gu­son, Mis­souri.

ADL’s com­pre­hen­sive report on New Black Pan­ther Party is avail­able on the ADL web­site at: New Black Pan­ther Party for Self Defense

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November 21, 2014 0

ISIS Supporters Exploit Mixlr To Broadcast Extremism

Ter­ror­ist sym­pa­thiz­ers are exploit­ing the web­site and appli­ca­tion Mixlr to broad­cast and dis­cuss their extrem­ist views online. Their use of Mixlr par­al­lels pre­vi­ous efforts by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and its sup­port­ers to find and uti­lize new online plat­forms for spread­ing their pro­pa­ganda.mixlr-isis

Mixlr is a plat­form that enables users to broad­cast live audio “to the world” and to “chat, engage and inter­act with your lis­ten­ers in real time.” Mixlr is avail­able online and for smart­phones. Users can also log in via Face­book and Twitter.

Sup­port­ers of the ISIS have cre­ated at least two pages on Mixlr for broad­cast­ing and dis­cussing pro-ISIS material.

The pri­mary account is called Khi­lafah (Ara­bic for Caliphate). The sta­tion some­times broad­casts mul­ti­ple times per day and has a con­sid­er­able fol­low­ing: The account began broad­cast­ing on Octo­ber 19, 2014, and had gar­nered 44,548 “total lis­tens” as of Novem­ber 20, 2014. Broad­casts cover a vari­ety of ISIS related top­ics includ­ing news updates on ISIS and reports from ISIS sup­port­ers around the world.

The Khi­lafah account has 665 fol­low­ers who reg­u­larly con­verse on the site dur­ing broad­casts. Although much of the chat is mun­dane (requests to fix the sound qual­ity, for exam­ple), some com­ments demon­strate the users’ extrem­ism. A con­ver­sa­tion on Novem­ber 21, for exam­ple, cel­e­brated ISIS’s alleged takeover of the Iraqi city of Ramadi with one com­menter writ­ing, “They are dri­ven to the death…we will feed the faith with the blood of their veins.”

This account also has Pro mem­ber­ship sta­tus on Mixlr, which enables it to broad­cast for an unlim­ited num­ber of hours per week. This is a paid membership.

The sec­ondary pro-ISIS page, AL7AQ, has only 134 fol­low­ers, and is likely designed to replace the Khi­lafah page if it is shut down. That said, there has been some con­ver­sa­tion on the AL7AQ page as well.

The pages have an asso­ci­ated Twit­ter feed that announces upcom­ing broad­casts and archives pre­vi­ous ones and pro­motes videos on YouTube that explain how to access the broad­cast con­tent. As of Novem­ber 20, 2014, the Twit­ter feed had 2,393 fol­low­ers, most of whom are appar­ently ISIS sup­port­ers based on their com­ments and account pictures.

The same broad­casts are also avail­able on Paltalk, a pro­gram that enables video, voice, and group chats. Paltalk has been exploited by extrem­ists in other instances as well. The Authen­tic Tauheed Paltalk chan­nel, for exam­ple, broad­casts extrem­ist and pro-ISIS mes­sages by rad­i­cal cleric Abdul­lah al-Faisal.

In the past, ISIS and its sup­port­ers have attempted to use alter­na­tive social media sites includ­ing Frien­dica, Dias­pora and Quit­ter in order to keep their infor­ma­tion online as their accounts were shut down by Face­book and Twit­ter. Frien­dica, Dias­pora and Quit­ter have removed all pro-ISIS pages from their sites, and Twit­ter and Face­book reg­u­larly delete accounts that pro­mote ISIS messages.

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