Hamas-Fatah Unity Deal Raises Many Questions » ADL Blogs
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June 9, 2014 3

Hamas-Fatah Unity Deal Raises Many Questions

On Mon­day June 2nd, a tran­si­tional Pales­tin­ian unity gov­ern­ment was sworn in based on an agree­ment reached between Fatah and Hamas. The gov­ern­ment, which is headed by Pales­tin­ian Author­ity Prime Min­is­ter Rami Ham­dal­lah, con­sists of rep­re­sen­ta­tives from Fatah and so-called inde­pen­dent “tech­nocrats” who appear to be not directly affil­i­ated with Hamas. The agree­ment requires elec­tions to be held within six months.

Although the US admin­is­tra­tion rushed to pub­licly say it “would work with” the new gov­ern­ment, even they have acknowl­edged there are many ques­tions regard­ing the prac­ti­cal impli­ca­tions and via­bil­ity of this unity gov­ern­ment. After all, sim­i­lar past rec­on­cil­i­a­tions, includ­ing the 2011 Cairo Accord and 2012 Doha Dec­la­ra­tion, both of which are cited as a basis for parts of the cur­rent agree­ment, quickly fell apart.

Hamas Flag

Hamas Flag

At this very early stage, it is fool­ish to pre­dict how the arrange­ment will work in prac­tice, and espe­cially whether free and fair Pales­tin­ian elec­tions will indeed be held in six months. In fact, in the days since the agree­ment was signed, there have been pub­lic dis­putes over finan­cial issues between Hamas and Fatah, and secu­rity forces of both par­ties have detained and arrested offi­cials from the other. Hamas retains its con­trol over a highly trained and well-armed ter­ror­ist para­mil­i­tary force, and an arse­nal of rock­ets and mis­siles which it has used to tar­get Israeli civil­ians. Will the Pales­tin­ian Author­ity secu­rity forces be deployed in Gaza and will Hamas lay down its weapons? If not, how can the pledge by Pres­i­dent Abbas to adhere to the Quar­tet con­di­tions be taken seriously?

Mid­dle East ana­lyst Ehud Yaari argues that by enter­ing into the unity agree­ment, Hamas is fol­low­ing the so-called Hezbol­lah model. Sim­i­lar to Hezbol­lah in Lebanon, Hamas gets polit­i­cal legit­i­macy and main­tains its intim­i­dat­ing and bru­tally effec­tive mil­i­tary force through their Izz al-Din al-Qassam Brigade. Indeed, Hamas’s secu­rity forces are larger and bet­ter equipped than the Pales­tin­ian Authority’s, and the unity agree­ment makes no men­tion of Hamas dis­arm­ing the al-Qassam Brigade.

Other dif­fi­cult ques­tions about the unity agree­ment that remain murky include what role the so-called tech­nocrats will play in set­ting pol­icy for the new gov­ern­ment, how much influ­ence Hamas’s lead­er­ship will actu­ally have in the Pales­tin­ian Authority’s pol­icy mak­ing, and if or how finan­cial sup­port to the PA from the US and other inter­na­tional donors will be applied in Hamas’s strong­hold over Gaza.

Regard­ing the inde­pen­dent tech­nocrats, there are likely two rea­sons why Pales­tin­ian Pres­i­dent Abbas decided to include them as opposed to actual Hamas offi­cials. First, Abbas cal­cu­lated that the US and oth­ers in the inter­na­tional com­mu­nity would almost cer­tainly reject a Pales­tin­ian gov­ern­ment which included Hamas, a State Depart­ment des­ig­nated For­eign Ter­ror­ist Orga­ni­za­tion. And sec­ond, there are inter­nal Fatah con­cerns about grant­ing Hamas sig­nif­i­cant influ­ence within the Pales­tin­ian Author­ity, and how it could under­mine Abbas and Fatah’s stand­ing among Palestinians.

Yet even with­out its direct par­tic­i­pa­tion, Hamas’s back­ing of the new gov­ern­ment raises seri­ous ques­tions about Pres­i­dent Abbas’s desire and abil­ity to pur­sue a peace­ful end to the Israeli-Palestinian con­flict. Despite Pales­tin­ian Author­ity claims that Hamas’s acqui­es­cence to the unity gov­ern­ment is suf­fi­cient to estab­lish its accep­tance of the inter­na­tional community’s cri­te­ria for engage­ment – which includes renounc­ing ter­ror against Israel, acknowl­edg­ing Israel’s right to exist and accept­ing exist­ing Israeli-Palestinian agree­ments – no senior Hamas offi­cial has ever made such a pub­lic pro­nounce­ment. In fact, when asked recently about the unity deal, Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh stated emphat­i­cally that Hamas would con­tinue its “resis­tance” efforts against Israel, even in the face of an agreement.

Thus far, the US admin­is­tra­tion has lit­tle or noth­ing to say about all of these open questions.

One last big ques­tion remains — what if new elec­tions are held in the next six months and Hamas wins again, just as it did in 2006?

  • ML Fisher

    When is the ADL going to con­demn Pres­i­dent Obama for sup­port­ing a TERRORIST GOVERNMENT. Pres­i­dent Obama is giv­ing money and is pub­licly sup­port­ing the new Pales­tin­ian ter­ror­ist government…a gov­ern­ment who wants to kill every Jew liv­ing in Israel, and the ADL won’t open up it’s mouth. Oh, I am sorry, I for­got:
    Demo­c­rat Party first… Israel last.
    Demo­c­rat Party first… Jew­ish self-respect never.

    Do you have no shame?.. Do you have no self-respect!

  • Billy the Kid

    ADL must also acknowl­edge rights of their ene­mies. If Israel did not have sup­port of
    U. S. for many years„ the entire region would per­haps be a bet­ter place for all humans. to live. In many ways, Israel is also a ter­ror­ist nation.

  • Joe

    Agree with ear­lier com­ment below– poor lead­er­ship by Abe Fox­man has embold­ened the Obama and Kerry team to under­cut Israel. Fox­man seems more con­cerned with Dems and let­ters from Obama than in stand­ing up for Israel . His weak­ness has allowed Obama by his actions to fos­ter more not less anti-semitism. When will Abe step down so we can get lead­er­ship with guts and independence?