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April 10, 2014 3

Egyptian Government Website Includes Arabic Copy Of The Protocols

egypt-state-information-service-protocols

Intro­duc­tion page to the Pro­to­cols on the SIS website

An Ara­bic copy of the noto­ri­ous anti-Semitic forgery The Pro­to­cols of the Learned Elders of Zion is avail­able on the Egypt­ian government’s State Infor­ma­tion Ser­vice (SIS) website.

The web­site is described as “Your gate­way to Egypt” and is affil­i­ated with the office of the Pres­i­dent. “Egypt State Infor­ma­tion Ser­vice is the nation’s ‎main infor­ma­tional, aware­ness and pub­lic rela­tions agency. The SIS web­site was launched in 2009 and on 6/9/2012 a decree was issued to trans­fer the affil­i­a­tion of (SIS) from the Min­istry of Infor­ma­tion to the Pres­i­dency of the Repub­lic,” a state­ment on the web­site reads in part.  It is unclear when this PDF copy of the Pro­to­cols was posted to the SIS website

The book is an Ara­bic trans­la­tion of the orig­i­nal Pro­to­cols by an Egypt­ian writer, Abbas el-Akkad. The book first appeared in the early 1960s and includes a warn­ing to the reader that the Jews will fight this book any­where it appears.

The web­site offers other pub­li­ca­tions and arti­cles on Egypt’s cul­ture, his­tory and pol­i­tics orga­nized by sec­tions. The Pro­to­cols, how­ever, is avail­able on the web­site with­out any clas­si­fi­ca­tion or edi­to­r­ial lan­guage and can be accessed via a direct link or through a tra­di­tional search engine.

While anti-Semitism themes are not new in Egypt or to its elected offi­cials, a gov­ern­ment web­site pro­vid­ing access to the Pro­to­cols is a trou­bling reminder of just how steeped these nar­ra­tives are in Egypt­ian society.

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April 9, 2014 0

Iran Weekly: Selected News & Developments

The fol­low­ing is a selec­tion of news reports and com­men­tary from Iran­ian media and main­stream pub­li­ca­tions on devel­op­ments per­tain­ing to Iran. This weekly update includes a sam­pling of pub­lished reports from Iran’s Farsi-language media* as well as rel­e­vant arti­cles from the inter­na­tional press.

Iran­ian Media

FM: Iran’s nego­ti­a­tions with Pow­ers not related to eco­nomic pressures

(Fars News Agency – April 9, 2014)

While address­ing expa­tri­ate Iran­ian researchers and uni­ver­sity pro­fes­sors in Vienna before the resump­tion of talks with the P5+1, Iran­ian For­eign Min­is­ter Moham­mad Javad Zarif said, “The Iran­ian nation has opted for nego­ti­a­tions based on its mod­er­ate spirit and its ten­dency for mod­er­a­tion and inter­ac­tions. He also added, “If any­one thinks that the Iran­ian nation has cho­sen nego­ti­a­tions due to the eco­nomic pres­sures, he/she is def­i­nitely wrong in his/her analysis.”

Iran’s over­hauled war­ship proves suc­cess­ful in joint drills with Oman

(Fars News Agency – April 9, 2014)

Fol­low­ing the com­ple­tion of joint naval drills with Oman on Mon­day, Deputy Com­man­der of the Navy for Oper­a­tions Rear Admi­ral Shahram Irani said, “[The] Shamshir missile-launcher war­ship is capa­ble of fir­ing dif­fer­ent mid-range and long-range surface-to-surface mis­siles, includ­ing Nour and Qader, or any other type of mis­sile after its recent overhaul.”

Com­man­der raps West for double-standards towards human rights issues

(Fars News Agency – April 9, 2014)ali-fadavi-irgc-iran

In response to last week’s Euro­pean Union res­o­lu­tion crit­i­ciz­ing Iran’s human rights vio­la­tions, Brigadier Gen­eral and Com­man­der of the IRGC Ali Fadavi said, “The ene­mies of the Islamic Rev­o­lu­tion con­sider jus­tice and Human Rights to be in their right places when they serve the inter­est of company-owners, dom­i­neer­ing power and inter­na­tional Zionism.”

Zarif ques­tions EP’s legit­i­macy to preach on human rights

(Tas­nim News Agency – April 6, 2014)

Fol­low­ing the Euro­pean Union’s res­o­lu­tion against Iran on human rights, For­eign Min­is­ter Moham­mad Javad Zarif responded with: “Given the polit­i­cal weight, laws and the recent his­tory in Europe…, it is obvi­ous that the Euro­pean Par­lia­ment lacks legit­i­macy and pop­u­lar­ity to preach to the oth­ers on observ­ing the human rights.”

Aya­tol­lah Ker­mani: The peo­ple of Iran will not per­mit the Euro­peans to estab­lish a new den of spies*

(Basij News Agency – April 4, 2014)

Aya­tol­lah Moham­mad Ali Mova­hedi Ker­mani, one of Tehran’s Fri­day prayer lead­ers, responded to the EU’s human rights res­o­lu­tion against Iran by telling the faith­ful that “The peo­ple of Iran will not allow the Euro­pean Union to open a new spy den in the country.”

IRGC Com­man­der: Iran to give ‘stun­ning’ response to ene­mies’ threats

(Fars News Agency – April 3, 2014)

Com­man­der of the IRGC’s elite Qods Force Qassem Suleimani boasted of Iran’s prowess over its ene­mies. “The ene­mies do not real­ize that the Iran­ian peo­ple are able to astound them. Rely­ing on its devoted nation, our coun­try will strongly con­front any threat posed by the ene­mies,” Suleimani said in South­ern Ker­man province.

Inter­na­tional Media

 

Iran’s supreme leader: Nuclear talks should con­tinue, but with­out concessions

(Ynet – April 9, 2014)

Supreme Leader Aya­tol­lah Khamenei con­firmed that nego­ti­a­tions will con­tinue; how­ever, he empha­sized that “all should know that nego­ti­a­tions will not stop or slow down any of Iran’s activ­i­ties in nuclear research and development.”

Spain arrests four accused of attempt­ing to export equip­ment to Iran

(CNN – April 8, 2014)

One Iran­ian and three Spaniards were arrested by Span­ish author­i­ties for secretly try­ing to export indus­trial equip­ment to Iran that could be used to make mis­sile parts or enrich uranium.

Iran’s choice for U.N. post denied entry into the U.S.

(The New York Times – April 7, 2014)

The U.S. Sen­ate voted against issu­ing a visa to Iran’s new ambas­sador to the United Nations due to charges that he was involved in the 1979 United States Embassy hostage-taking cri­sis in Tehran.

Chi­nese man, Iran firms charged in nuclear export case

(Bloomberg – April 4, 2014)

A Chi­nese national and two Iran­ian firms were charged with con­spir­ing to export devises that can be used to enrich uranium.

Iran must see ram­i­fi­ca­tions if nuclear talks fail, for­mer advi­sors say

(The Wall Street Jour­nal – April 4, 2014)

Two for­mer advis­ers to the Obama Admin­is­tra­tion call for the White House and Con­gress to increase the threat of using mil­i­tary force against Iran if talks fail.

Boe­ing, GE say get U.S. license to sell spare parts to Iran

(Reuters – April 4, 2014)

Boe­ing and Gen­eral Elec­tric Co. announced that they had received licenses from the U.S. Trea­sury Depart­ment to export some spare parts for Iran’s aging com­mer­cial aircrafts.

Ira­ni­ans avoid bad luck with out­door festival

(The Sun Her­ald – April 2, 2014)

A report on the Iran­ian fes­ti­val of “Sizdeh Bedar,” the last day of the long Per­sian New Year celebration.

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April 9, 2014 1

Congress Must Follow President Obama’s Lead to Close The Wage Gap

equal-pay-day-signingUpdate — April 9, 2014: The Pay­check Fair­ness Act died again in the Sen­ate.  The Sen­ate voted 53–44 to end debate and bring the bill to the floor for a vote, falling short of the 60 votes needed to over­come a filibuster.

April 8 is Equal Pay Day, mark­ing the num­ber of days the aver­age woman has to work into the new year to earn what a man in an equiv­a­lent job earned in the last cal­en­dar year alone. Nor­mally it’s not a day to cel­e­brate. Instead, it serves as a stark reminder that women in the United States still earn only 77 cents for every dol­lar a man receives.

That fact is morally and socially unac­cept­able.  But it is also eco­nom­i­cally fool­ish: the World Eco­nomic Forum has said that if women’s pay equaled men’s, the U.S. GDP would grow by nine percent.

Yes­ter­day Pres­i­dent Obama signed two direc­tives aimed at clos­ing the wage gap. First, an Exec­u­tive Order pro­hibits fed­eral con­trac­tors from retal­i­at­ing against employ­ees for shar­ing their salary infor­ma­tion with one another, mak­ing it eas­ier for women to dis­cover and address pay­check inequity. And the Pres­i­dent also instructed the Depart­ment of Labor to cre­ate new reg­u­la­tions requir­ing fed­eral con­trac­tors to report salary infor­ma­tion to the gov­ern­ment, expos­ing salary inequities and thereby encour­ag­ing con­trac­tors to close the wage gap voluntarily.

Both pres­i­den­tial actions mir­ror pro­vi­sions of the Pay­check Fair­ness Act, a bill now pend­ing before the Sen­ate which Con­gress has twice con­sid­ered and twice failed to pass. The mea­sure would amend the Equal Pay Act of 1963, which made it unlaw­ful for busi­nesses to pay men and women dif­fer­ent salaries for per­form­ing sub­stan­tially the same work. The Act would give teeth to the ban, mak­ing it ille­gal for com­pa­nies to retal­i­ate against employ­ees for dis­cussing salary dif­fer­ences and open­ing busi­nesses up to civil lia­bil­ity for salary inequity.

The Pay­check Fair­ness Act pro­vides essen­tial enhance­ments to the Lilly Led­bet­ter Fair Pay Act of 2009.  That Act resets the statute of lim­i­ta­tions for fil­ing an equal-pay law­suit every time a female employee receives a pay­check with a dis­crim­i­na­tory wage.  The law was a nar­row response to a dev­as­tat­ing Supreme Court rul­ing, Led­bet­ter v. Good Year Tire & Rub­ber Co., which held that women could only sue within 180 days of receiv­ing the first dis­crim­i­na­tory pay­check.  The Court found, incred­i­bly, that Ms. Led­bet­ter, the plain­tiff in the case, was enti­tled to no relief because she filed a law­suit in 1998 after dis­cov­er­ing the com­pany had been pay­ing her sig­nif­i­cantly less than her male coun­ter­parts since 1979.

Con­gress should fol­low Pres­i­dent Obama’s lead in clos­ing the wage gap and pay­ing women fair and equal salaries.  Hope­fully we will soon think of Equal Pay Day as a relic of the past, and will no longer have to mark a day on the cal­en­dar that demon­strates the fif­teen months it takes the aver­age woman to earn what the aver­age man earns in twelve.

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