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July 24, 2015 3

Lafayette Shooting Suspect Fixated on Perceived Moral Decay

john-russell-hauser-louisiana-state-police

John Rus­sell Hauser (Louisiana State Police)

A pre­lim­i­nary exam­i­na­tion of the on-line writ­ings of John Rus­sell Houser, who killed him­self last night after a vicious shoot­ing spree at a movie the­ater in Lafayette, Louisiana, that left two dead and nine oth­ers injured, reveals a twisted, angry man upset at a per­ceived moral decay that he thought was destroy­ing the United States.

Houser, orig­i­nally from Geor­gia but who had lived in var­i­ous places across the South prior to the shoot­ing, spent much of his free time in recent years mak­ing short, angry posts to on-line dis­cus­sion forums and com­ment sec­tions on var­i­ous web­sites, often using the screen name “Rusty Houser.” In many of these posts, Houser dis­cussed his belief that the United States was “about to fall.”

His dis­con­tent with the United States led him to make extreme anti-American state­ments, such as describ­ing the United States as “the enemy of the world.” When, in the win­ter of 2015, some 200 cars piled up in a multi-vehicle snow­storm acci­dent, Houser claimed that “the lack of moral Amer­i­cans stand­ing for any­thing makes me wish it were 200 747’s.”

In another post­ing, he wrote that he was “with all those who hate the filth farm known as the U.S.” In 2014, Houser claimed that “all coun­tries that hate the U.S.” needed to unite.

As some of these state­ments indi­cate, Houser was obsessed with the notion of moral decay in the United States; this obses­sion fueled much of his anger.

Anti-black racism played an impor­tant role in Houser’s vision of decay and doom. He repeat­edly argued that blacks should be deported because they, as he said in one 2013 post­ing, “WILL NOT WORK and have NO FAMILY VALUES.” This was lan­guage Houser used again and again, some­times refer­ring to blacks explic­itly, at other times describ­ing them in other ways, such as “another race, not Latinos.”

In 2014, Houser claimed that “fail­ing to men­tion the role of Blacks in build­ing and main­tain­ing the alliance of evil that lit­er­ally grips the globe” would slow the re-taking of Amer­ica. “Else­where, this par­tic­u­lar role is the Jew. Here in the U.S., it is the Black.” In another 2014 post­ing, Houser elab­o­rated on the morality-hating peo­ple who allegedly con­trolled Amer­ica, an alliance con­sist­ing of 1) upper class whites; 2) Blacks; and 3) “mis­fits,” which Houser listed as “homos, trans­ves­tites, peo­ple who will not work, peo­ple with no cul­ture, etc.”

Other sources of decay for Houser included athe­ists, lib­er­als, and gays—in the lat­ter instance, Houser even sup­ported the rabidly homo­pho­bic West­boro Bap­tist Church.

In con­trast, Houser admired other eth­nic or reli­gious groups, such as Lati­nos or Mus­lims. This was because he viewed such groups as either hard work­ing or with strong moral val­ues, or both. “I will never under­stand,” he posted in 2013,” why the hard work­ing, morally supe­rior Lati­nos never bring up for dis­cus­sion the other race which is known to be com­pletely the oppo­site for the most part.”

Refer­ring to Mus­lim immi­grants, for exam­ple, he said, “those com­ing in are far more decent morally than the aver­age Amer­i­can.” Ira­ni­ans, he wrote in late 2013, were “far higher morally than this finan­cially fail­ing filth farm.”

Faced with this fan­tasy sce­nario of doom and decay, Hauser seemed to have hoped for a man on horse­back who would sweep away all the per­ceived moral filth—a Travis Bickle writ large. “The one bright spot,” he wrote on one forum in 2013, “is that all mat­ters in need of tidy­ing up will be dealt with in sum­mary fash­ion soon.”

One of his mod­els for such a leader was Adolf Hitler, whom he repeat­edly praised. In 2013, he wrote that “Hitler’s reac­tion to much would be invalu­able now, if 98% weren’t brain­washed in the U.S.” In early 2015, he claimed that Hitler “accom­plished far more” than any other lead­ers. Around the same time, he claimed that “decent peo­ple can retake the entire world, as Hitler proved.”

In a dif­fer­ent 2015 post­ing, Houser wrote that “Hitler is loved for the results of his prag­ma­tism” and that “the U.S. is no more than a finan­cially fail­ing filth farm. Soon the phrase ‘rul­ing with an iron hand’ will be palat­able anew.”

In 2013, Houser had sim­i­lar views on Amer­i­can white suprema­cist fig­ure David Duke, writ­ing that “at one time [Duke] appeared exactly what the U.S. needed.”

Houser also admired the Golden Dawn, a Greek neo-Nazi polit­i­cal party, describ­ing them in 2014 as “com­posed of moral peo­ple.” Else­where, he described their ideas as “a legit­i­mate effort to solve prob­lems” and their lead­ers as “intel­li­gent, well spo­ken, and exer­cis­ing good faith.”

Houser had sim­i­larly admir­ing views of a vari­ety of other extrem­ist groups and move­ments, includ­ing rad­i­cal Islamists. “Yes, I am salut­ing the fun­da­men­tal­ist Mus­lims,” he said in Jan­u­ary 2015, “They have stood against evil.” He added, in a follow-up post, “They have my com­plete Chris­t­ian respect.”

These atti­tudes and opin­ions, which reveal them­selves so strik­ingly in Houser’s writ­ings, raise the unset­tling but real pos­si­bil­ity that he delib­er­ately chose a show­ing of the movie Train­wreck at which to launch a Taxi Dri­ver–like spree of vio­lence. The writer and star of the movie, tal­ented young come­dian Amy Schumer, has received con­sid­er­able media atten­tion thanks to the movie and her pop­u­lar tele­vi­sion show, and, given her cho­sen comedic per­sona of a sex­u­ally free-wheeling woman, as well as her lib­eral opin­ions, one could imag­ine how a dis­turbed mind like Houser’s could come to focus on the movie as a sym­bol for all of his dark fan­tasies about moral decay in America.

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July 23, 2015 3

Help Take ISIS Videos Off WordPress

Ansar Khilafah promotes terrorist propaganda on WordPress

Screen­shot from the site

The Anti-Defamation League con­tacted Word­Press about a web­site it hosts that fea­tures hun­dreds of Islamic State in Syria and Iraq (ISIS) pro­pa­ganda videos, state­ments and publications.

This par­tic­u­lar web­site includes pro­pa­ganda released by ISIS and other ter­ror groups in Eng­lish, French, Turk­ish, Dutch, Ara­bic and other lan­guages. Among the hun­dreds of items on the site are behead­ing and exe­cu­tion videos, as well as videos and arti­cles encour­ag­ing West­ern­ers to travel to join ISIS or to com­mit attacks on its behalf in their home countries.

Help us urge Word­Press to remove this web­site from its plat­form. Copy this URL https://ansarkhilafah.wordpress.com and paste it into the Word­Press com­plaint form. Mark it as “abu­sive” and tell Word­Press that it’s NOT OK to sup­port ter­ror­ist content.

The pro­pa­ganda made avail­able by this web­site comes from var­i­ous ISIS media out­lets, includ­ing Al Hayat Media, Al Furqan Media, Al-I’tisam Media and Ajnad Media. The site also has a sec­tion for ISIS’ English-language mag­a­zine Dabiq.

Ansar Khilafah blog on WordPress features ISIS propaganda

Screen­shot from the site

Online repos­i­to­ries of ter­ror­ist pro­pa­ganda are not new. In Feb­ru­ary 2015, an ISIS sup­porter cre­ated a web­site called IS-Tube. Sim­i­lar to the Word­Press site, IS-Tube pro­vided access to an archive of search­able ISIS pro­pa­ganda videos. IS-Tube was hosted on a Google-owned IP bloc, and Google quickly removed the site after ADL noti­fied the com­pany of its pres­ence. Both IS-Tube and the Word­Press site appear to have orig­i­nated in the Netherlands.

In July 2014, ISIS attempted to move its online pres­ence away from Twit­ter – where its accounts were reg­u­larly shut down – to alter­nate social media plat­forms Frien­dica and Quit­ter. ADL pub­li­cized the move and Frien­dica and Quit­ter quickly removed all ISIS pres­ence from their platforms.

If you come across such con­tent on other plat­forms, the ADL’s Cyber-Safety Action Guide pro­vides resources on flag­ging con­tent directly with host companies.

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July 17, 2015 0

Military Sites And Personnel: A Common Target for Islamic Extremists

The Chattanooga recruiting center attacked by Abdulazeez on July 16, 2015

The recruit­ing cen­ter attacked by Abdu­lazeez on July 16, 2015

The motive behind Moham­mad Yousef Abdulazeez’s attack on two mil­i­tary sites in Chat­tanooga, Ten­nessee, that killed four Marines yes­ter­day remains unclear. His actions, how­ever, are con­sis­tent with other domes­tic attacks and plots car­ried out by U.S. res­i­dents moti­vated by Islamic extrem­ist ideologies.

Mil­i­tary sites and per­son­nel are a com­mon tar­get for Islamic extrem­ists in the U.S. and ter­ror­ist pro­pa­ganda has encour­aged vio­lence against mil­i­tary tar­gets. An Islamic State of Iraq and Syria(ISIS) pro­pa­ganda video released April 14, 2015, for exam­ple, fea­tured images of dead and wounded sol­diers with the cap­tions, “muti­lated sol­diers are com­ing back to your home­land close to des­per­a­tion. Eyes are being lost, bod­ies with­out legs, we want your blood….”

Two of the three deadly Islamic extrem­ist attacks in the U.S. since 2009, (the Ft. Hood shoot­ing and the shoot­ing at the Lit­tle Rock, Arkansas army recruit­ing cen­ter) were specif­i­cally directed at mil­i­tary targets.

  • Abdul­hakim Mujahid Muham­mad was 23 years old when he killed one sol­dier and injured another dur­ing a drive by shoot­ing at a mil­i­tary recruit­ing office in Lit­tle Rock, Arkansas. Muham­mad, a con­vert to Islam, admit­ted shoot­ing the uni­formed sol­diers “because of what they had done to Mus­lims in the past” and said that he “would have killed more sol­diers had they been in the park­ing lot.” He also report­edly admit­ted that he was angry about the killing of Mus­lims in Iraq and Afghanistan. Prior to the Lit­tle Rock shoot­ing, he had thrown a fire­bomb at a rabbi’s house  in Nashville, Ten­nessee, and fired shots at a rabbi’s home in Lit­tle Rock. Loca­tions and indi­vid­u­als that are, or are per­ceived as, Jew­ish or related to Israel are also reg­u­lar tar­gets for Islamic extrem­ist plots. Moham­mad had also attempted to carry out an addi­tional attack on a mil­i­tary recruit­ing cen­ter in Kentucky.
  • Nidal Malik Has­san, was 39 years old when he killed 13 peo­ple at the Fort Hood Army Base in Texas, where he had been work­ing as an army psy­chi­a­trist. Prior to the attack, Has­san had been in con­tact with Anwar Al-Awlaki, the U.S. born English-language pro­pa­gan­dist for Al Qaeda in the Ara­bian Penin­sula (AQAP), who was killed in a drone strike in 2011. In an inter­view with a Yemeni jour­nal­ist, al-Awlaki claimed that Hasan viewed him as a con­fi­dant and he said that he “blessed the act because it was against a mil­i­tary tar­get. And the sol­diers who were killed were not nor­mal sol­diers, but those who were trained and pre­pared to go to Afghanistan and Iraq.”

There have been numer­ous other plots against mil­i­tary insti­tu­tions and per­son­nel in the years since the Fort Hood and Lit­tle Rock attacks in 2009. The fol­low­ing is a sam­pling of those plots that tar­geted spe­cific mil­i­tary facil­i­ties in the U.S. since 2009:

  • April 10, 2015: John T. Booker, Jr., a 20-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen from Kansas was arrested and charged with attempt­ing to under­take a sui­cide attack at Ft. Riley mil­i­tary base.
  • March 26, 2015: Hasan Edmonds, a 22-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen from Illi­nois and Jonas Edmonds, a 29-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen from Illi­nois, were arrested and charged with attempt­ing to join ISIS. Court doc­u­ments indi­cate the two were also for­mu­lat­ing a plot against the National Guard armory in Juliet where Hasan, a mem­ber of the National Guard, had trained, using Hasan’s uni­form and his knowl­edge of the site.
  • Feb­ru­ary 2015: An Unnamed 16-year-old minor from South Car­olina was arrested for a plot to under­take a shoot­ing at a North Car­olina mil­i­tary insti­tu­tion and then travel to join ISIS. He was charged as a minor in pos­ses­sion of a pis­tol and sen­tenced in March 2015 to five years in juve­nile deten­tion, fol­lowed by counseling.
  • Feb­ru­ary 2, 2015: Abdi­rah­man Sheikh Mohamud, a 23-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen from Ohio, was arrested and charged with join­ing Jab­hat al Nusra. Court doc­u­ments indi­cate that Muhamud returned to the U.S. with the inten­tion of com­mit­ting an attack against a Texas mil­i­tary base.
  • Feb­ru­ary 7, 2014: Erwin Anto­nio Rios, a 19-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen, was arrested in 2013 and charged with pos­ses­sion of a stolen firearm. He is believed to have been plan­ning to mur­der U.S. mil­i­tary per­son­nel at Ft. Bragg.
  • Sep­tem­ber 29, 2011: Rezwan Matin Fer­daus, a 26-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen, was arrested for plan­ning to fly explosives-packed model air­planes into the Pen­ta­gon in order to “dis­able their (the Amer­i­can) mil­i­tary center.”
  • July 27, 2011:Naser Jason Abdo, a 21-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen, was charged in July 2011 with plan­ning to bomb a restau­rant fre­quented by Ft. Hood per­son­nel and then to tar­get the sur­vivors with firearms. Abdo yelled “Nidal Hasan Fort Hood 2009″ while leav­ing his first court appearance.
  • June 23, 2011: Yonathan Melaku, a 23-year-old nat­u­ral­ized U.S. cit­i­zen orig­i­nally from Ethiopia, was arrested after he fired shots at the National Museum of the Marine Corps, the Iwo Jima memo­r­ial and the Pentagon.
  • June 23, 2011: Abu Khalid Abdul-Latif, a 33-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen and Walli Majahidh, a 32-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen were arrested for a plot to attack a Mil­i­tary Entrance Pro­cess­ing Site in Seat­tle, Washington.
  • Decem­ber 8, 2010: Anto­nio Mar­tinez, a 21-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen and a recent con­vert to Islam, was charged with attempt­ing to det­o­nate what he believed was a car bomb at an army recruit­ing cen­ter in Catonsville, Maryland.
  • Novem­ber 5, 2009: As described above, Nidal Malik Hasan, a 39-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen and army psy­chi­a­trist, killed 12 sol­diers and one civil­ian in a shoot­ing at the Fort Hood army base.
  • July 27, 2009: Daniel Patrick Boyd, a 39-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen and con­vert to Islam, was arrested together with his sons, Dylan Boyd (22) and Zakariya Boyd (20), and four other North Car­olina res­i­dents — Ziyad Yaghi (21), Moham­mad Omar Aly Has­san (22), Anes Sub­a­sic (33), Hysen Sher­ifi (24) and Jude Kenan Muham­mad (20) — with con­spir­ing to mur­der U.S. mil­i­tary per­son­nel in con­nec­tion with Boyd’s alleged sur­veil­lance of a Marine Corps base in Quan­tico, Vir­ginia. Boyd had obtained maps of the mil­i­tary base to plan the attack and pos­sessed armor pierc­ing ammu­ni­tion to “attack the Amer­i­cans,” accord­ing to the Depart­ment of Justice.
  • June 1, 2009: As described above, Abdul­hakim Mujahid Muham­mad, a 23-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen and a con­vert to Islam, was arrested fol­low­ing his attack at the Lit­tle Rock, Arkansas mil­i­tary recruit­ing cen­ter that killed one soldier.
  • May 20, 2009: U.S. cit­i­zens James Cromi­tie (44), David Williams (28) and Onta Williams (32) and Hait­ian native Laguerre Payen (23) were arrested for a plot that involved plant­ing what they believed were bombs in cars out­side of the Riverdale Tem­ple and the nearby Riverdale Jew­ish Cen­ter. They also plot­ted to destroy mil­i­tary air­craft at the New York Air National Guard Base located at Stew­art Air­port in New­burgh, New York.

There have also been instances of indi­vid­u­als who dis­cussed attack­ing the mil­i­tary or mil­i­tary per­son­nel more broadly, but did not have spe­cific tar­gets. They include Asia Sid­diqui and Noelle Velentzas, who were arrested in 2015 and allegedly dis­cussed bomb­ing a mil­i­tary or gov­ern­ment tar­get;  Mufid Elfgeeh, who was arrested in 2014 and allegedly intended to shoot mil­i­tary per­son­nel; and Jose Pimentel, who was arrested in 2011 and plot­ted to attack mil­i­tary per­son­nel and other targets.

Oth­ers report­edly con­sid­ered attack­ing mil­i­tary insti­tu­tions but then chose other tar­gets instead. For exam­ple, Alexan­der Cic­colo was arrested in 2015 and allegedly dis­cussed tar­get­ing the mil­i­tary before decid­ing to attack a uni­ver­sity, and Amine El Khal­ifi, who was arrested in 2012 and allegedly dis­cussed tar­get­ing the mil­i­tary before decid­ing to attack the Cap­i­tal building.

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