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August 18, 2015 3

Farrakhan Promotes Anti-Semitism & Violence In Lead Up To Oct. March

Nation of Islam (NOI) leader Louis Far­rakhan has invoked hate­ful anti-Semitic con­spir­acy the­o­ries and called for vio­lence against white peo­ple dur­ing his multi-city tour to pro­mote the Octo­ber 10 “Justice…Or Else!” Mil­lion Man March (MMM) in Wash­ing­ton, DC.farrakhan-justice-or-else-miami-2015

In his August 13 remarks at a church in Mil­wau­kee, Far­rakhan accused Jews of con­trol­ling the media, gov­ern­ment and econ­omy. Far­rakhan told the con­gre­ga­tion, “I’m talk­ing about the wicked ones in the Jew­ish com­mu­nity that run Amer­ica, run the gov­ern­ment, run the world, own the banks, own the means of com­mu­ni­ca­tion. They are my ene­mies! But as sure as I’m alive, my ene­mies will be made my foot­stool and so will yours.”

Far­rakhan also invoked the canard that Jews killed Jesus stat­ing, “Would the Jew had lis­tened to Jesus…but you rebelled against him and killed him.”

In his July 30 remarks in Miami, Far­rakhan asserted “A Jew is not a Jew by the cir­cum­ci­sion of the male organ but cir­cum­ci­sion of the heart.” Farrakhan’s Miami remarks also took a par­tic­u­larly mil­i­tant tone. He stated, “If the fed­eral gov­ern­ment will not inter­cede in our affairs, then we must rise up and kill those who kill us! Stalk them! And kill them! And let them feel the pain of death that we are feeling!”

Far­rakhan employed sim­i­lar rhetoric in Mil­wau­kee, say­ing that the media have mis­rep­re­sented him as vio­lent because “white peo­ple deserve to die, and they know, so they think it’s us com­ing to do it.” He con­tin­ued, “Allahu akbar! God is great! We have no weapon! We bother nobody! Then if you come to take our life, don’t’ be sur­prised if you lose your own!”

In an effort to build sup­port for the “Justice…Or Else!” MMM, Far­rakhan has spo­ken in Wash­ing­ton, Philadel­phia, New York, Miami, Atlanta, Chicago, St. Louis, Hous­ton, Los Ange­les, Mil­wau­kee, and Memphis.

Malik Zulu Shabazz, the racist and anti-Semitic for­mer leader of the New Black Pan­ther Party and cur­rent leader of Black Lawyers for Jus­tice, has also actively been pro­mot­ing the event for the NOI in var­i­ous parts of the country.

The NOI has also orga­nized other local events led by African-American reli­gious and com­mu­nity lead­ers. Some MMM events have fea­tured sup­port from national, state, and local elected offi­cials, celebri­ties, and others.

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August 12, 2015 0

From Charleston to Chattanooga: The Face of Terror in America

By Oren Segal and Mark Pit­cav­age
Direc­tors of the Anti-Defamation League’s Cen­ter on Extremism

Ter­ror­ism is some­times referred to as the “face­less enemy,” but it has hardly been face­less in the United States this sum­mer.  Too many peo­ple have emerged from the shad­ows to inflict death and suffering.

The parade of vio­lence has seemed unend­ing, from Elton Simp­son and Nadir Soofi, who attacked police offi­cers pro­vid­ing secu­rity for the so-called “Muham­mad Art Exhibit” in Texas in May, to John Houser, the Hitler-admiring man obsessed with the moral decay of Amer­ica who recently opened fire at a Louisiana movie the­ater show­ing the movie Train­wreck.

Of the var­i­ous killers and would-be killers this sum­mer, two stand out.  The first is Dylann Storm Roof, the white suprema­cist who allegedly con­fessed to the June mas­sacre at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Car­olina, that left nine African-Americans dead.dylann-storm-roof-gun-confederate-flag-600

The sec­ond is Muham­mad Youssef Abdu­lazeez, who in July engaged in a shoot­ing spree tar­get­ing a Chat­tanooga mil­i­tary recruit­ing cen­ter and a nearby naval reserve cen­ter.  Abdu­lazeez, who may have been inspired by rad­i­cal Mus­lim cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, killed five people—all mil­i­tary personnel—before being killed by police.

In many ways, Roof and Abdu­lazeez per­son­ify America’s ter­ror­ist threat; they are the faces of the “face­less enemy.”  Most obvi­ously, each rep­re­sents a major source of ter­ror­ism.  Roof was a white suprema­cist who allegedly hoped to start a “race war” in which whites would pre­vail.  White suprema­cists have for decades been the most pro­lific source of domes­tic extremist-related lethal vio­lence.  Along with the other main seg­ment of the extreme right, anti-government mili­tia groups and sov­er­eign cit­i­zens, they are respon­si­ble for the great major­ity of extremist-related deaths in the U.S.

Abdu­lazeez, on whom there is less infor­ma­tion regard­ing moti­va­tion, may well have latched onto the ideas of al-Awlaki—including his encour­age­ment of attacks on mil­i­tary targets—as a way to atone for some of his per­sonal demons, includ­ing drugs and alco­hol.  Domes­tic Islamic extrem­ists have in recent years attempted or con­ducted a large num­ber of ter­ror­ist plots, con­spir­a­cies and acts, despite being fewer in num­ber than right-wing extremists.

Both men also chose tar­gets typ­i­cal of their move­ments.  For Abdu­lazeez, it was the mil­i­tary; here he fol­lowed in the foot­steps of Abdul­hakim Mujahid Muham­mad, who killed a sol­dier at a recruit­ing cen­ter in Lit­tle Rock, Arkansas, in 2009, and Nidal Malik Has­san, who killed 13 peo­ple at Fort Hood, Texas, that same year.  Other Islamic extrem­ists have also recently plot­ted attacks against mil­i­tary tar­gets in the U.S., though with­out success.mohammad-youssef-abdulazeez

Roof went on a shoot­ing ram­page against African-Americans.  Sprees of vio­lence against racial, eth­nic, or reli­gious minori­ties are a com­mon type of white suprema­cist ter­ror­ism.  In recent years, there have been a num­ber of such episodes, includ­ing Fra­zier Glenn Miller’s attacks on Jew­ish insti­tu­tions in Over­land Park, Kansas, in 2014; Wade Michael Page’s ram­page at a Sikh tem­ple in Oak Creek, Wis­con­sin, in 2012, and Keith Luke’s attacks on African immi­grants in Brock­ton, Mass­a­chu­setts, in 2009.

Both Roof and Abdu­lazeez used firearms for their attacks, which is also typ­i­cal of Amer­i­can ter­ror­ism.  Although the pub­lic usu­ally thinks of ter­ror­ism in terms of bombs, ter­ror­ists like Ted Kaczyn­ski and the Boston Marathon bombers are rare in Amer­ica.  The vast major­ity of extremist-related mur­ders involve guns—easy to acquire, sim­ple to use, and deadly.  This is why Charleston and Chat­tanooga num­ber among the 10 dead­liest extremist-related attacks of the past 50 years.  Indeed, with the excep­tion of the Okla­homa City bomb­ing, the “top 10” attacks all involved firearms.

Abdu­lazeez and Roof were both young men, dis­af­fected, fac­ing per­sonal stresses of dif­fer­ent kinds (Abdu­lazeez also suf­fered from men­tal ill­ness).  Although ter­ror­ism knows no age limits—Nidal Hasan was 39 at the time of his Fort Hood ram­page, while white suprema­cist James Von Brunn, who attacked the U.S. Holo­caust Memo­r­ial Museum in 2009, was in his late 80s—many of the attacks and plots in recent years by both Islamic and right-wing extrem­ists have been com­mit­ted by men in their mid-20s or younger.

Like Abdu­lazeez and Roof, a num­ber of these extrem­ists com­mit­ted their attacks as lone wolves, unat­tached to any par­tic­u­lar group.  Over­all, the num­ber of lethal lone wolf attacks in the past two decades has been fairly low, num­ber­ing only a few dozen, but in recent years, lone wolves seem to have been emerg­ing at a faster rate.  One rea­son may be the increas­ing role played by the Inter­net in facil­i­tat­ing self-radicalization.  It was through the Inter­net that Roof edu­cated him­self in white supremacy; it was via the Inter­net that Abdu­lazeez down­loaded record­ings of al-Awlaki.

Here one can see a sig­nif­i­cant dif­fer­ence between right-wing extrem­ists and domes­tic Islamic rad­i­cals.  While they can both eas­ily immerse them­selves in a sea of on-line pro­pa­ganda designed to instill and rein­force extreme views, right-wing extrem­ist Inter­net sources are pri­mar­ily based in the United States and, there­fore, must watch what they say.  White suprema­cists who openly use the Inter­net to encour­age vio­lence and ter­ror­ism open them­selves up to crim­i­nal inves­ti­ga­tion and, if vio­lence occurs, pos­si­ble civil lia­bil­ity; as a result, their encour­age­ment of vio­lence is often more implicit than explicit.

Domes­tic Islamic extrem­ists, in con­trast, receive most of their rad­i­cal­iz­ing mes­sages from abroad, from ter­ror­ist groups and like-minded sup­port­ers who are freer to use the Inter­net to call for vio­lence and ter­ror­ism within the U.S.  Pro­pa­ganda from Al Qaeda in the Ara­bian Penin­sula, for exam­ple, was an inspi­ra­tion for the Boston Marathon bomb­ing.  In the past two years, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has taken such tac­tics to a new level alto­gether, employ­ing a vir­tual army of on-line recruiters who use social media plat­forms to reach and rad­i­cal­ize sus­cep­ti­ble indi­vid­u­als across the globe.  Seek­ing to instill a deep sense of com­mu­nity and pur­pose, ISIS sup­port­ers encour­age Amer­i­cans to come to the Mid­dle East to help it fight its wars—many of the 80+ U.S. res­i­dents linked to Islamic extrem­ist activ­ity since 2014 have made such attempts. But ISIS also urges peo­ple to launch attacks in the U.S.

Roof and Abdu­lazeez were both cold-blooded killers.  Their attacks deeply affected the cit­i­zens of Charleston and Chat­tanooga and, indeed, the whole coun­try, though not always in the same ways.  In par­tic­u­lar, the Chat­tanooga shoot­ings, like some sim­i­lar attacks before them, stirred anti-Muslim sen­ti­ments directed at America’s entire Mus­lim com­mu­nity, a dis­turb­ing phe­nom­e­non for which there is no par­al­lel with regard to white suprema­cist attacks.

But their attacks were sim­i­lar in that they were both essen­tially futile, able to achieve lit­tle but death and mis­ery.  Indeed, the reac­tions to the attacks illus­trate just how inef­fec­tive they actu­ally were.  The Chat­tanooga attack, for exam­ple, inspired an out­pour­ing of sup­port for the U.S. mil­i­tary. The Charleston response was even more pow­er­ful.  Far from start­ing a “race war,” Roof’s slaugh­ter not only brought Charlesto­ni­ans of all races together but also resulted in a bipar­ti­san effort to remove the Con­fed­er­ate flag from the South Car­olina capitol.

Amer­i­can extrem­ists, of what­ever stripe, can hurt and even kill, but the one thing they can’t do is win.

Mr. Segal is an author­ity on Islamic extrem­ism and ter­ror­ism in the United States; Dr. Pit­cav­age is an expert on right-wing extrem­ism and ter­ror­ism in the United States.

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August 11, 2015 6

White Supremacists Relish “Cuckservative” Controversy

The polit­i­cal pun­ditry over the use of the con­tro­ver­sial term “cuck­ser­v­a­tive” may have died down this week but the white suprema­cists who orig­i­nally pop­u­lar­ized the word’s use are still quite pleased about get­ting credit for bring­ing the term into main­stream consciousness.

cuckservative immigration

Andrew Anglin, the white suprema­cist who runs the pop­u­lar neo-Nazi web­site Daily Stormer, claimed recently that “We have been given a gift with the res­onat­ing #cuck­ser­v­a­tive meme, and we must make cer­tain to milk it for all it’s worth.”

The neol­o­gism “cuck­ser­v­a­tive,” a com­bi­na­tion of “con­ser­v­a­tive” and “cuck­old,” is used by white suprema­cists to describe a white Chris­t­ian con­ser­v­a­tive who pro­motes the inter­ests of Jews and non-whites over those of whites.

For white suprema­cists, the term is explic­itly about race and iden­tity and essen­tially describes what other white suprema­cists might term “race trai­tors.”   Who first coined the term is not clear, but what is clear is that white suprema­cists became its first early adopters.

Many white suprema­cists using the term “cuck­ser­v­a­tive” are from the “alter­na­tive right” a term used by white suprema­cists to refer to rene­gade con­ser­v­a­tives who have adopted white suprema­cist view­points and have essen­tially removed them­selves from main­stream conservatism.

The term “cuck­ser­v­a­tive” likely got its start on social media. In June, some­one began using the Twit­ter han­dle “The Cuck­ser­v­a­tive” and post­ing racist and big­oted tweets but the term may have been in use ear­lier. On July 15, a blog­ger named Alfred W. Clark wrote about the term “#cuck­ser­v­a­tive” in a blog called Occam’s Razor and com­mented that it was spread­ing through­out the alter­na­tive right.

Richard Spencer, who founded the white suprema­cist jour­nal Radix and runs the National Pol­icy Insti­tute, a white suprema­cist “think tank,” re-posted the arti­cle in Radix on July 16. One week later, con­ser­v­a­tive Red State blog­ger Erick Erick­son tweeted that the term was “a slur against Chris­t­ian vot­ers coined by white supremacists.”

From there, polit­i­cal com­men­ta­tors from both the left and right began writ­ing about the term cuck­ser­v­a­tive and argu­ing that it had made its way into main­stream con­ser­vatism when it appears that few peo­ple other than white suprema­cists were using the term. Some com­men­ta­tors made ref­er­ence to Rush Lim­baugh using it on his talk show radio pro­gram on July 22 but Lim­baugh actu­ally did not men­tion the word cuck­ser­v­a­tive but used sim­i­lar lan­guage say­ing that Don­ald Trump was dif­fer­ent from “your aver­age, ordi­nary, cuck­olded Republican.” cuckservative MLK

White suprema­cists rou­tinely seek to insert their slogans—and ideas—into the main­stream, try­ing to find a wider audi­ence for their views. From their so-called “14 words” slo­gan (“We must secure the exis­tence of our peo­ple and a future for white chil­dren”) to white suprema­cist Bob Whitaker’s numer­ous racist pro­pa­ganda mantras (e.g., “Anti-racist is a code word for anti-white”), white suprema­cists have tried many times—generally with­out success—to have their ideas become part of the pub­lic con­ver­sa­tion. For them, accep­tance of cuck­ser­v­a­tive into main­stream dis­course seems a rare “victory.”

White suprema­cists hope that the pub­lic­ity sur­round­ing cuck­ser­v­a­tive may attract dis­af­fected whites, angry at or dis­sat­is­fied with pop­u­lar main­stream con­ser­v­a­tives, to their own rad­i­cally racist move­ment instead.

In recent weeks, a range of white suprema­cists have writ­ten about the impor­tance of the cuck­ser­v­a­tive meme to the racist right. Kevin Mac­Don­ald, a retired anti-Semitic pro­fes­sor and a leader in the white suprema­cist Amer­i­can Free­dom Party, wrote in his online jour­nal Occi­den­tal Observer that the cuck­ser­v­a­tive meme is “brash, witty” and “a new art form.” He added that the meme is “a great exam­ple of the new intel­lec­tual and moral con­fi­dence among white advo­cates,” and that its pop­u­lar­ity shows that “internet-savvy and socially adept Whites” are attracted to the white suprema­cist cause.

Greg John­son, who founded the white suprema­cist online jour­nal Counter-Currents, said in a recent arti­cle on that site that the “cuck­ser­v­a­tive con­tro­versy is an impor­tant oppor­tu­nity for White Nation­al­ists.” He adds that it was an oppor­tu­nity for white Amer­i­cans to real­ize that “whites are being demo­graph­i­cally dis­placed because of polit­i­cal policies.”

In an arti­cle in the white suprema­cist jour­nal Radix, Gre­gory Hood, a writer for a num­ber of white suprema­cist online pub­li­ca­tions, asserted that the cuck­ser­v­a­tive meme shows that the “alt.Right is ironic, sub­ver­sive and cyn­i­cal. It’s about turn­ing the tac­tics of the Left back on itself, decon­struct­ing the tropes and nar­ra­tives forced upon us.”

Spencer claimed that “#Cuck­ser­v­a­tive is, put sim­ply, impor­tant: it has got­ten under the skin of our ene­mies and has become a har­bin­ger for some­thing beyond con­ser­vatism. Thus, it is impor­tant that we get it right—and not allow the meme to be turned into just another syn­onym for ‘liberal.’”

The term “cuck­ser­v­a­tive” like most neol­o­gisms, prob­a­bly will have a lim­ited shelf-life, but white suprema­cists hope its usage will con­tinue far into the future.

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