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June 11, 2015 1

Event Offers Chance to Win Pink Prison Underwear Signed by Joe Arpaio

Ore­go­ni­ans for Immi­gra­tion Reform (OFIR), the most active anti-immigrant group in the state, is adver­tis­ing a June 27 “Grass­roots Rally” in Salem, Ore­gon, that will fea­ture Arizona’s Sher­iff Joe Arpaio as the main speaker and a raf­fle that includes an auto­graphed pair of the infa­mous pink pris­oner under­wear that Arpaio forces inmates in his county to wear.

Sheriff Joe Arpaio

Sher­iff Joe Arpaio

The rally is report­edly being hosted by the Ore­gon Repub­li­can Party and will focus on immi­gra­tion reform and Sec­ond Amend­ment rights. The choice of Arpaio, who is known for his hard stance on immi­gra­tion, is indica­tive of the rally’s anti-immigration slant.

In May 2012, the Jus­tice Depart­ment brought a fed­eral law­suit against Arpaio, assert­ing that there was a “pat­tern of unlaw­ful dis­crim­i­na­tion” toward Lati­nos by law enforce­ment offi­cials in Mari­copa County. Accord­ing to the law­suit, Arpaio and his deputies car­ried out a cam­paign against Lati­nos, regard­less of their sta­tus or citizenship.

In a sep­a­rate case, a fed­eral judge ruled in May 2013 that the Mari­copa County Sheriff’s Office engaged in racial pro­fil­ing. That rul­ing stemmed from a 2007 class action suit by Latino dri­vers, who charged that were being unlaw­fully sin­gled out for traf­fic stops based on their ethnicity.

The judge in the case ordered Arpaio to undergo train­ing in racial pro­fil­ing so that his offi­cers would not sin­gle out Lati­nos dur­ing traf­fic and immi­gra­tion stops. The judge also barred Arpaio’s immi­gra­tion enforce­ment patrols. Arpaio has since allegedly vio­lated the court order regard­ing the patrols and is now fac­ing con­tempt charges.

Arpaio is also known for his pol­icy of requir­ing Mari­copa County inmates to wear pink under­wear. In 2012, a fed­eral appeals court in Ari­zona crit­i­cized this pol­icy, say­ing it seemed to be “pun­ish­ment with­out legal jus­ti­fi­ca­tion.” The court also said that it was fair to infer that the jail­ers’ choice of the color pink for the under­wear was a way to stig­ma­tize male pris­on­ers as fem­i­nine. In an effort to off­set the cost of the rally, a pair of “pink pris­oner under­wear,” auto­graphed by Arpaio will be auc­tioned off at the event.

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June 10, 2015 0

ADL Submits Testimony to House Committee on Homeland Security

The House Com­mit­tee on Home­land Secu­rity held a hear­ing on June 3, 2015, on the increas­ing efforts by extrem­ists, such as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), to use sophis­ti­cated social media and other Inter­net plat­forms to recruit mem­bers, share pro­pa­ganda and inspire attacks.Terrorism Gone Viral The Attack in Garland, Texas and Beyond

ADL, which tracks how ter­ror­ist groups exploit new tech­nol­ogy, works closely with the Inter­net indus­try and trains law enforce­ment around the coun­try, sub­mit­ted com­pre­hen­sive tes­ti­mony for the hear­ing record high­light­ing the exten­sive efforts of ter­ror­ists to har­ness new tech­nol­ogy for recruit­ment and radicalization.

The League’s state­ment included details on the unprece­dented num­ber of indi­vid­u­als liv­ing in the United States linked to plots, con­spir­a­cies, and other activ­ity on behalf of for­eign ter­ror­ist groups thus far in 2015.

The hear­ing, titled “Ter­ror­ism Gone Viral The Attack in Gar­land, Texas and Beyond,” focused on the attempted vio­lent attack at a Gar­land, Texas, com­mu­nity cen­ter last month. One of the appar­ent shoot­ers, Elton Simp­son, main­tained an active pres­ence on Twit­ter, with at least eight accounts that he used to net­work with ISIS sup­port­ers prior to the attack. Simp­son is believed to have inter­acted with Mohamed Abdul­lahi Has­san, a per­ma­nent U.S. res­i­dent that may have inspired as many as 11 peo­ple liv­ing in the U.S. to take action in the last two years.

Led by Com­mit­tee Chair­man Michael McCaul (R-TX), Mem­bers heard from three sub­ject mat­ter experts: John Mul­li­gan, Deputy Direc­tor of the National Coun­tert­er­ror­ism Cen­ter, Fran­cis X. Tay­lor, Under Sec­re­tary in the DHS Office of Intel­li­gence and Analy­sis and Michael B. Stein­bach,  Assis­tant Direc­tor of the FBI, on these issues.

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June 4, 2015 13

League of the South and Neo-Nazis Join Forces in Kentucky

Mem­bers of the neo-Confederate League of the South (LOS) joined together with neo-Nazis and other white suprema­cists on May 30 for a “Feds Out of Ken­tucky” rally in Alexan­dria, Ken­tucky, a few miles south­east of Cincinnati.

League of the South, Alexandria, KY

“Feds Out of Ken­tucky” rally in Alexan­dria, KY

The rally was orga­nized by Cole­man Lacy, a young mem­ber of the LOS from the local area who serves as the group’s “state chairman.”

In addi­tion, Geof­frey Rash, the Ken­tucky leader of the neo-Nazi National Social­ist Move­ment (NSM) and also a local res­i­dent, brought mem­bers to the event. After­wards, Rash stated that it was good for the LOS and the NSM to work together “to rid this coun­try, start­ing with our own states, of the Zion­ist Jewry that decays our peo­ple, our states and our nation.”

Though the LOS pro­moted the event, only about 14 peo­ple took part in the rally, wav­ing flags and anti-government signs.

How­ever, the sig­nif­i­cance of the event was not in its size.

Rather, the Alexan­dria rally marked the com­ple­tion of the LOS’s grad­ual trans­for­ma­tion from a neo-Confederate group that typ­i­cally denied hav­ing racist ties into an unabashed white suprema­cist group.

The LOS has had ties to other hate groups in the past but fre­quently denied such ties or dis­tanced itself from hate groups when ties were actu­ally pub­li­cized. In 2005, fol­low­ing the dev­as­ta­tion of Hur­ri­cane Kat­rina on the Gulf Coast, mem­bers of both the NSM and White Rev­o­lu­tion announced the LOS’s coop­er­a­tion in pro­vid­ing assis­tance to “white only” vic­tims of the hur­ri­cane. The LOS later said that it did not take part in or endorse such measures—though it did post “whites only” offers of assis­tance on its own website.

As recently as 2013, the LOS expelled a mem­ber, Matthew Heim­bach (also head of the Tra­di­tion­al­ist Youth Net­work, a small white suprema­cist group), for attend­ing a neo-Nazi event in Ken­tucky. How­ever, in another sign of the trans­for­ma­tion of the LOS into an explic­itly white suprema­cist group, Heim­bach was back inside the folds of the LOS within a year. Heim­bach attended the Alexan­dria rally.

Behind the grow­ing rad­i­cal­iza­tion of the LOS is none other than its founder and long­time leader, Michael Hill. Once a col­lege his­tory pro­fes­sor, by 2011, Hill was urg­ing his fol­low­ers to arm them­selves and “join the resis­tance.” The LOS began offer­ing mem­bers weapons train­ing around this time.

Protests by African-American com­mu­ni­ties in 2015 in the wake of highly-publicized police shoot­ings moved Hill even fur­ther into bla­tant white supremacy. In May 2015, Michael Hill declared his deter­mi­na­tion to par­tic­i­pate in a race war if “negroes,” egged on by the “largely Jewish-Progressive owned media,” engaged in “black rage.” Hill warned that “if negroes think a ‘race war’ in mod­ern Amer­ica would be to their advan­tage, they had bet­ter pre­pare them­selves for a very rude awak­en­ing.” On June 1, Hill openly declared that “our South­ern fore­bears” who opposed civil rights for African-Americans “were right.”

With a leader spout­ing tirades about race war and fol­low­ers openly cavort­ing with neo-Nazis and other white suprema­cists, there can be no fur­ther doubt that the League of the South, despite its past denials, is any­thing other than an explic­itly white suprema­cist organization.

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