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March 28, 2014 0

Hezbollah Is Still Trying To Broadcast Messages To Your Handheld

Hezbollah’s media arm Al Manar launched free mobile appliAl Manar Appcations on iTunes and Google Play this month, the satel­lite station’s sec­ond attempt to spread their hate mes­sages to iPhone and Android users.

In July 2012, ADL exposed the first app launched by Hezbol­lah, which was also avail­able on Apple and Google Play, and the app was sub­se­quently removed. ADL swiftly noti­fied Apple and Google about the new apps this time as well. The iTunes ver­sion has already been removed but the appli­ca­tion is still avail­able on Google Play.

The iTunes app, called LCG, is a less advanced app than its pre­de­ces­sor but still had the abil­ity to pro­vide live stream­ing to Al Manar’s tele­vi­sion sta­tion. Al Manar broad­casts Hezbollah’s mes­sages of hate and vio­lence, dis­sem­i­nates anti-Semitic and anti-American pro­pa­ganda, and glo­ri­fies sui­cide bomb­ings to its view­ers. The new app also pro­vided access to fea­tured videos of senior offi­cials of both Iran and Hezbollah.

Hezbol­lah is a U.S. des­ig­nated For­eign Ter­ror­ist Orga­ni­za­tion, and Al Manar was listed as a “Spe­cially Des­ig­nated Global Ter­ror­ist” by the Depart­ment of the Trea­sury in 2006.

The repeated attempts by Hezbol­lah to estab­lish a pres­ence and pro­vide access to its con­tent via users’ cell­phones under­scores the high pre­mium the ter­ror­ist group gives to mod­ern tech­nol­ogy. In Jan­u­ary 2014, Al Manar launched a What­sApp pro­file pre­sum­ably in an effort to pro­vide a faster and more direct way of com­mu­ni­cat­ing with its users.

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January 3, 2014 0

WhatsApp Hezbollah?

Hezbollah’s media arm, Al Manar TV, which is listed as a “Spe­cially Des­ig­nated Global Ter­ror­ist Entity” is exploit­ing yet another Amer­i­can tech­nol­ogy com­pany to reach and inter­act with audi­ences around the world.whatsapp-hezbollah

Al Manar is using the ser­vices of a California-based instant mes­sag­ing ser­vice called What­sApp to deliver “break­ing news” via text and to allow its sup­port­ers to inter­act with the station.

Al-Manar broad­casts Hezbollah’s mes­sages of hate and vio­lence, dis­sem­i­nates anti-Semitic and anti-American pro­pa­ganda and glo­ri­fies sui­cide bomb­ings to mil­lions of view­ers in the Arab world, Europe and South East Asia for 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The Al Manar web­site has already pub­lished selected mes­sages sub­mit­ted by users of What­sApp from around the world; some of the mes­sages include state­ments express­ing loy­alty and alle­giance to Hezbol­lah Chief, Has­san Nas­ral­lah.Hezbol­lah, a U.S. des­ig­nated For­eign Ter­ror­ist Orga­ni­za­tion, has increased its pres­ence on var­i­ous inter­net plat­forms includ­ing social media net­works such as Twit­ter, Face­book and YouTube, in recent years. This exploita­tion of mod­ern tech­nol­ogy has enabled Hezbol­lah to dis­sem­i­nate its mes­sages more broadly and quickly than ever before.

In July of 2012, ADL exposed Al Manar’s efforts to cre­ate free appli­ca­tions for smart­phones avail­able through iTunes and other online stores. The appli­ca­tion was removed from the iTunes store and Hezbol­lah issued a state­ment blam­ing ADL for the removal of its applications.

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December 5, 2013 0

Hezbollah Video Games Targeting Youth Promote War Against Israel

Hezbol­lah has launched a web­site for chil­dren “ages 11 and above” fea­tur­ing games that sim­u­late Hezbol­lah mis­sions against Israel from the ter­ror­ist orga­ni­za­tions per­spec­tive dat­ing back to 1982.hezbollah-video-game-adl

Play­ers can take part in sim­u­lated mis­sions from 1982, 1986, 1996, 1999 and 2000. The web­site says that “The games…are not ran­dom. Their goals are to strengthen the cul­ture of resistance.”

Each game is made up of three lev­els requir­ing play­ers to shoot with period-appropriate weapons rang­ing from machine guns to Katyusha rock­ets to tanks. Play­ers also under­take other actions such as fig­ur­ing out codes to dis­able radar and advanc­ing on tar­gets in the face of oppos­ing fire.

The web­site, launched in Novem­ber, also fea­tures videos pro­duced by Hezbollah’s satel­lite tele­vi­sion sta­tion Al Manar. The videos pro­vide play­ers with Hezbollah’s nar­ra­tives on the conflicts.

  • In the 1986 game, play­ers advance on a for­ti­fied hill to an Israeli out­post using a vari­ety of weapons until they are able to kill all the Israeli sol­diers, take con­trol of the out­post and seize ammu­ni­tion and equipment.
  • In the 1999 game, play­ers must first dis­able mon­i­tor­ing equip­ment before they can explode a road­side bomb to destroy a con­voy trans­port­ing Israeli Gen­eral Erez Gerstein.
  • The 2000 game involves fir­ing rock­ets into Israeli ter­ri­tory to kill Israeli sol­diers on patrol.

Hezbol­lah has pre­vi­ously pro­duced video games; in 2003, it began sell­ing a game called “Spe­cial Force,” which was fol­lowed in 2007 by “Spe­cial Force 2.” Both depicted attacks against Israelis. Hezbol­lah claimed that the orig­i­nal Spe­cial Force sold over 10,000 copies inter­na­tion­ally, in loca­tions rang­ing frospecial-force-hezbollahm Lebanon and Syria to Canada, Ger­many and Australia.

The new games, which are avail­able for free through Hezbollah’s main web­site, had attracted nearly 350 “likes” on an asso­ci­ated Face­book page, pri­mar­ily from Lebanese young adults aged 18–34, with many oth­ers likely play­ing directly on the web­site. The Face­book page was appar­ently removed on Decem­ber 3 or 4 but has since been recreated.

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