american renaissance » ADL Blogs
Posts Tagged ‘american renaissance’
May 14, 2013 4

Richard Spencer: A Symbol Of The New White Supremacy

Richard Spencer, 35, is a sym­bol of a new gen­er­a­tion of intel­lec­tual white suprema­cists. Based in White­fish, Mon­tana, he runs a vari­ety of ven­tures that pro­mote racist ideology.richard-spencer

Spencer received media atten­tion this week after a reporter dis­cov­ered that Spencer pub­lished two arti­cles by Jason Rich­wine, co-author of the recent Her­itage Foun­da­tion report on alleged costs of immi­gra­tion report. Spencer pub­lished the pieces on on Alter­na­tive Right, a racist web­site he founded.

In addi­tion to Alter­na­tive Right (which he no longer edits but still writes for), Spencer runs the National Pol­icy Insti­tute (NPI), a white suprema­cist think tank; pub­lishes Radix, a jour­nal that pro­motes white cul­ture and iden­tity, and heads Wash­ing­ton Sum­mit Pub­lish­ers, a com­pany that sells books by lead­ing intel­lec­tual white suprema­cists such as Jared Tay­lor of Amer­i­can Renais­sance and the late Sam Francis. 

Through all of these ven­tures, Spencer has become a leader in white suprema­cist cir­cles that envi­sion a “new” right that will openly embrace “white racial con­scious­ness.” Although Spencer began his career The Amer­i­can Con­ser­v­a­tive, he has since rejected con­ser­vatism. He believes that con­ser­v­a­tives can’t or won’t rep­re­sent explic­itly white interests.

Spencer has been an influ­ence on a younger gen­er­a­tion of college-age racists. In 2010 and 2011, lead­ers of the now defunct racist stu­dent group, Youth for West­ern Civ­i­liza­tion, invited Spencer to speak at Van­der­bilt Uni­ver­sity in Ten­nessee and Prov­i­dence Col­lege in Rhode Island. In both speeches to stu­dents at the schools, Spencer attacked affir­ma­tive action.

In other instances, Spencer has rejected the idea of appeal­ing to main­stream audi­ences. In a 2011 inter­view on the web­site of Wer­mod and Wer­mod, a British-based pub­lish­ing com­pany that also sells white suprema­cist books, Spencer said, “Try­ing to ‘work within the sys­tem,’ or appeal to European-Americans using the lan­guage of FOX News and the GOP, is a bootless—not to men­tion a tasteless—strategy.”

Instead, at the April 2013 Amer­i­can Renais­sance con­fer­ence, Spencer called for the cre­ation of a “white ethno-state on the North Amer­i­can continent.”

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

February 21, 2013 3

Anti-Immigrant Umbrella Group U.S., Inc.’s New Website Reveals Organization’s Influence

The anti-immigrant umbrella orga­ni­za­tion, U.S., Inc., founded and run by racist John Tan­ton, the pri­mary archi­tect of the modern-day anti-immigrant move­ment, recently estab­lished a web­site for the first time in its 31-year his­tory. The web­site pro­vides fur­ther insight into how the orga­ni­za­tion works and the “projects” it runs.

In an in-depth inter­view about found­ing the anti-immigrant move­ment, Tan­ton dis­cussed why he cre­ated U.S., Inc.: Since I had been involved over the years in start­ing a num­ber of orga­ni­za­tions, each of them a sep­a­rate group which required sep­a­rate account­ing and sep­a­rate fil­ings with the IRS, I got the idea in about 1979 of set­ting up an umbrella foun­da­tion, out of which a num­ber of projects could be run.”

Many of these “projects” founded or nur­tured by Tan­ton devel­oped into some of the lead­ing anti-immigrant groups in the coun­try today, the most notable exam­ple being Num­ber­sUSA. NumbersUSA’s founder Roy Beck worked for Tan­ton for years as the Wash­ing­ton edi­tor of Tanton’s anti-immigrant jour­nal The Social Con­tract (TSC). Beck founded Num­ber­sUSA in 1996/1997 and the group remained under U.S. Inc.’s umbrella until 2002, when it broke off and became an inde­pen­dent organization.

Another “project” for­merly under the U.S., Inc. umbrella was U.S. Eng­lish, a group devoted to mak­ing Eng­lish the offi­cial lan­guage of the United States. Tan­ton resigned as chair­man from U.S. Eng­lish after a news­pa­per revealed a racially charged memo penned by Tan­ton ask­ing ques­tions like “will blacks be able to improve (or even main­tain) their posi­tion on the face of the Latin onslaught?” and “will Latin Amer­i­can migrants bring with them the tra­di­tion of the mor­dida (bribe)?”

U.S., Inc.’s web­site high­lights its cur­rent “projects,” includ­ing Tanton’s pub­lish­ing house, the Social Con­tract Press, which pub­lishes racist books, such as Jean Raspail’s Camp of the Saints, and sells books by racists such as Sam Fran­cis, Wayne Lut­ton and Peter Brimelow.  Another U.S., Inc. project is the anti-immigrant group Pro­Eng­lish. Bob Van­der­voort, ProEnglish’s exec­u­tive direc­tor, is report­edly the for­mer head of the white suprema­cist group Chicagoland Friends of Amer­i­can Renais­sance, a local chap­ter of the white suprema­cist orga­ni­za­tion Amer­i­can Renais­sance.

In addi­tion, U.S., Inc.’s web­site reveals the organization’s finan­cial doc­u­ments. Each year, it grants funds to anti-immigrant orga­ni­za­tions around the coun­try. Accord­ing to its finan­cial state­ments, U.S., Inc. pro­vided fund­ing for Florid­i­ans for Immi­gra­tion Enforce­ment, Cal­i­for­ni­ans for Pop­u­la­tion Sta­bi­liza­tion and 9/11 Fam­i­lies for a Secure Amer­ica in 2011.

U.S. Inc.’s new site pro­vides fur­ther evi­dence of its impor­tance to the anti-immigrant move­ment. In the past, the umbrella orga­ni­za­tion devel­oped bour­geon­ing anti-immigrant groups and helped them get on their feet; today it con­tin­ues to fund and sup­port well-established anti-immigrant groups around the country.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

October 17, 2012 12

White Supremacist Jared Taylor’s Speech at Texas A&M Is Sponsored by Neo-Nazi

Pre­ston Wiginton

Pre­ston Wig­in­ton, a 48-year-old neo-Nazi and for­mer racist skin­head, is spon­sor­ing a speech by white suprema­cist Jared Tay­lor at Texas A&M Uni­ver­sity on Octo­ber 23, 2012.  In an announce­ment about the speech, Tay­lor claims that there are “ongo­ing efforts to dis­place white Tex­ans at the uni­ver­sity” and refers read­ers to a Texas A&M report that dis­cusses racial diversity.

This will be the sec­ond time this month that Tay­lor has been invited to speak at a col­lege cam­pus. In early Octo­ber, he spoke at Tow­son Uni­ver­sity in Mary­land about the “legit­i­macy of white racial con­scious­ness” at the behest of the White Stu­dent Union.

Wig­in­ton is a famil­iar fig­ure at Texas A&M, where he is a for­mer stu­dent. In Jan­u­ary 2012, he held a demon­stra­tion at the cam­pus against Mar­tin Luther King, Jr. and the civil rights movement.

In the past, Wig­in­ton has brought other con­tro­ver­sial fig­ures to the cam­pus. In fall 2007, he spon­sored an appear­ance at Texas A&M by Nick Grif­fin, who was then the head of the ultra-right British National Party (BNP), a party that attracted many neo-Nazis.  Grif­fin spoke on the spread of Islam in Europe in a speech titled, “Islam, Ter­ror and West­ern Civilization.”

Ear­lier that year, Wig­in­ton also had the idea to bring Tay­lor to cam­pus to speak about diver­sity issues at the school. Wig­in­ton claimed he had attended a diver­sity sym­po­sium set up to address racial ten­sion at Texas A&M and he then chal­lenged the Asso­ciate Provost of Diver­sity at Texas A&M to debate Tay­lor. The cam­pus paper The Bat­tal­ion reported that Wig­in­ton held a 2-by-4 foot sign to pro­mote the debate, which did not take place.

Wig­in­ton is also vir­u­lently anti-immigrant. In Novem­ber 2005, he orga­nized and funded a lec­ture tour for anti-immigration activist Frosty Wooldridge. The tour cov­ered five Texas uni­ver­si­ties, includ­ing Texas A&M. The pur­pose of Wooldridge’s tour was to gather sig­na­tures on a peti­tion against Texas House Bill 1403, which gave chil­dren of undoc­u­mented immi­grants in-state col­lege tuition rates if they had grad­u­ated from a Texas high school and lived in the state for three years.

In addi­tion to liv­ing in Texas, Wig­in­ton has spent a lot of time in Rus­sia. In 2007, he addressed thou­sands of Russ­ian nation­al­ists at the Russ­ian March, which pro­moted Russ­ian nation­al­ism and attacked non-white immi­gra­tion. The par­tic­i­pants gave Nazi salutes at the march and shouted, “White power.”  Shortly after this event Wig­in­ton forged ties with Alexan­der Belov, an anti-Semitic, anti-immigrant nation­al­ist in Rus­sia.  In addi­tion, that year Wig­in­ton spoke at an annual memo­r­ial rally in Swe­den in honor of a 17-year-old neo-Nazi who was killed by non-Swedes in 2000.

Wig­in­ton was also active in racist skin­head cir­cles. In 2005, he attended a racist skin­head Ham­mer­fest in Drake­town, Geor­gia, and won the “World’s Strongest Skin­head Competition.”

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,