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July 18, 2016 3

The Washitaw Nation and Moorish Sovereign Citizens: What You Need to Know

GavinLongAfter author­i­ties iden­ti­fied Gavin Eugene Long as the man who shot and killed three police offi­cers from Baton Rouge and East Baton Rouge on July 17, uncon­firmed media reports claimed that Long (who also used the name Cosmo Sete­penra) had con­nec­tions with the anti-government extrem­ist sov­er­eign cit­i­zen movement.

Sov­er­eign cit­i­zens believe that a con­spir­acy sub­verted and replaced the orig­i­nal U.S. gov­ern­ment with an ille­git­i­mate “de facto” gov­ern­ment, but that peo­ple can take steps to divorce them­selves from the ille­git­i­mate gov­ern­ment, after which its laws, taxes, reg­u­la­tions and courts have no more author­ity over them.

These rumors were soon confirmed—though it is clear that Long’s beliefs also extend far beyond the sov­er­eign cit­i­zen move­ment into other areas as well—with the Kansas City Star unearthing sov­er­eign cit­i­zen doc­u­ments filed by Long that indi­cated an affil­i­a­tion with the “Washitaw Nation,” one of many con­cepts asso­ci­ated with the so-called “Moor­ish move­ment,” or “Moor­ish sov­er­eign move­ment,” an off­shoot of the sov­er­eign cit­i­zen move­ment that com­bines long­stand­ing sov­er­eign cit­i­zen beliefs and tac­tics with some newer, pri­mar­ily Afro­cen­tric notions.

Moor­ish sov­er­eign cit­i­zens emerged in the mid-1990s on the East Coast when some peo­ple began to merge sov­er­eign cit­i­zen ideas with some of the beliefs of the Moor­ish Sci­ence Tem­ple, a reli­gious sect dat­ing back to 1913.  As sov­er­eign cit­i­zen notions attracted more Moor­ish Sci­ence Tem­ple adher­ents, the Moor­ish sov­er­eign move­ment was born.  While still retain­ing most “tra­di­tional” sov­er­eign cit­i­zen pseudo-historical and pseudo-legal the­o­ries, Moor­ish sov­er­eigns added new ideas, includ­ing the notion that African-Americans had spe­cial rights because of a 1780s treaty with Morocco, as well as the belief that African-Americans were descended from African “Moors”—and often as well the belief that African-Americans were also a peo­ple indige­nous to the Americas.

WashitawNationBookThrough the late 1990s and early 2000s, the Moor­ish sov­er­eign cit­i­zen move­ment grew, gen­er­at­ing a large num­ber of groups and gurus to pro­mote Moor­ish sov­er­eign ideas, it also absorbed other black sov­er­eign groups that had begun inde­pen­dently.  The most impor­tant of these was the Washitaw Nation, which began in the mid-1990s in Louisiana, started by the “Empress” Ver­diacee “Tiara” Washitaw-Turner Gos­ton El-Bey, who claimed to head the Washitaw Empire.  Washitaw Nation adher­ents claimed to be descended from the ancient mound-builders of the Mississippi-Missouri Val­ley and to actu­ally own the Louisiana Purchase.

After the “Empress” retired, the orig­i­nal Washitaw group fell apart, replaced with a vari­ety of dif­fer­ent groups and indi­vid­u­als tak­ing up the “Washitaw Nation” man­tle.  So today there is not just one “Washitaw Nation,” but many, mak­ing it one of the most impor­tant wings of the Moor­ish sov­er­eign cit­i­zen movement.

Since 2009, the sov­er­eign cit­i­zen move­ment has expe­ri­enced a major resur­gence, includ­ing among African-Americans.  Both Moor­ish and non-Moorish sov­er­eign cit­i­zen ideas have spread rapidly within the African-American com­mu­nity, aided by social media web­sites such as YouTube and Face­book.   Moor­ish and non-Moorish sov­er­eign ideas alike have also spread in pris­ons and jails across the country.

Most sov­er­eign cit­i­zens are still white, but in a num­ber of cities with large African-American pop­u­la­tions such as Chicago, Detroit, Philadel­phia and oth­ers, African-Americans now com­prise the major­ity of sov­er­eign cit­i­zens.  Moor­ish sov­er­eign cit­i­zens can today be found in any area with a sub­stan­tial African-American population.

Key Attrib­utes of the Moor­ish Sov­er­eign Cit­i­zen Movement

  • Moor­ish sov­er­eign cit­i­zens engage in the same crim­i­nal activ­i­ties as “tra­di­tional” sov­er­eign cit­i­zens do, includ­ing crimes of vio­lence (includ­ing against police); scams and frauds; and so-called “paper ter­ror­ism” tac­tics, which typ­i­cally involves the use of var­i­ous doc­u­ments and fil­ings to harass, intim­i­date and retal­i­ate against police offi­cers, pub­lic offi­cials, and others.
  • There is still much over­lap between the Moor­ish sov­er­eign cit­i­zen move­ment and the Moor­ish Sci­ence Tem­ple (one rea­son many Moor­ish sov­er­eigns add the words –El or –Bey to their names), but not all Moor­ish Sci­ence Tem­ple adher­ents are sov­er­eign cit­i­zens and some vocally oppose sov­er­eign beliefs.
  • There are also African-American sov­er­eign cit­i­zens who do not adopt specif­i­cally Moor­ish sov­er­eign beliefs but only “tra­di­tional” sov­er­eign cit­i­zen notions.
  • Many Moor­ish sov­er­eign cit­i­zens also pro­mote var­i­ous Afro­cen­tric “New Age” beliefs and concepts.
  • Though the Moor­ish sov­er­eign move­ment is pri­mar­ily African-American in com­po­si­tion, there are a few white peo­ple asso­ci­ated with Moor­ish groups.  More­over, Moor­ish sov­er­eign cit­i­zens are not nec­es­sar­ily black sep­a­ratists nor nec­es­sar­ily con­nected with other black extrem­ist groups (though there is a small amount of overlap).
  • Like tra­di­tional sov­er­eign cit­i­zens, Moor­ish sov­er­eign cit­i­zens are heav­ily reliant upon sov­er­eign “gurus,” who come up with and pro­mote the movement’s ideas and tac­tics.  Some promi­nent Moor­ish sov­er­eign gurus include Taj Tarik Bey; Abdul Ali Muham­mad Bey; Queen Val­lahra Renita EL Harre,Bey; Irv­ing “Hendo” Hen­der­son; and Washitaw Nation fig­ures Wendy Far­ica Washitaw and Fredrix “Joe” Wash­ing­ton (grand­daugh­ter and son of the “Empress” Ver­diacee), among oth­ers. Many Moor­ish sov­er­eign cit­i­zens may also fol­low “tra­di­tional” sov­er­eign gurus; of these, David-Wynn Miller seems to be rather influ­en­tial among some Moor­ish sovereigns.

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July 6, 2016 13

Extremists Make Plans For GOP Convention

Updated July 21, 2016

The GOP con­ven­tion in Cleve­land (July 18–21) is a key oppor­tu­nity for a range of extrem­ists and big­ots who seek pub­lic­ity to voice their sup­port or oppo­si­tion to Don­ald Trump – and their hatred for any­one who dis­agrees with them.

As the Anti-Defamation League has noted, the 2016 U.S. Pres­i­den­tial cam­paign – and one can­di­date in par­tic­u­lar – has elicited unprece­dented lev­els of engage­ment and enthu­si­asm among anti-government and white suprema­cist extrem­ist groups.

The Anti-Defamation League’s Cen­ter on Extrem­ism has been mon­i­tor­ing extrem­ists’ plans to attend the Repub­li­can con­ven­tion in Cleve­land and has shared this infor­ma­tion with fed­eral law enforce­ment agents man­ag­ing secu­rity for the event. We will share new infor­ma­tion with those agents as it becomes available.

The fol­low­ing list of expected atten­dees is var­ied, rang­ing from indi­vid­u­als to orga­nized groups. This reflects the sup­port (and some­times oppo­si­tion) Don­ald Trump receives from a wide range of extrem­ists. It should be noted, there is no indi­ca­tion that Trump  sup­ports these groups.

  • Richard Spencer, who heads the National Pol­icy, a small white suprema­cist think tank, trav­eled to Cleve­land to pro­mote his racist views. Spencer held up a sign say­ing “Wanna Talk to a ‘Racist’? and report­edly said he “wanted to demys­tify white sep­a­ratism” for the peo­ple he encoun­tered in the pub­lic square near the con­ven­tion. Spencer also report­edly attended the “Wake Up!” party hosted by con­ser­v­a­tive activists, which included con­tro­ver­sial speak­ers such as Milos Yiannopou­los and anti-Muslim activists Pamela Geller and Geert Wilders, a Dutch politician.
  • Mem­bers of the anti-refugee vig­i­lante group Sol­diers of Odin USA, spot­ted out­side the con­ven­tion hall in Cleve­land, told a reporter they were there as a “com­mu­nity watch” orga­ni­za­tion and had no plans to con­front any­one unless they sensed “immi­nent dan­ger.” While they claim not to be racist, the Sol­diers of Odin USA are in fact vir­u­lently anti-Muslim and anti-immigrant. The group orig­i­nated in Fin­land, but has attracted thou­sands of mem­bers and admir­ers here in the United States, many of whom are either white suprema­cists or anti-government extremists.
  • Anti-government con­spir­acy the­o­rist Alex Jones spoke at a rally for Trump near the con­ven­tion hall host­ing the RNC, where he accused “glob­al­ists” of try­ing to imple­ment a “world gov­ern­ment.” Jones runs the Infowars web­site where he pro­motes  con­spir­acy the­o­ries such as the idea that the gov­ern­ment is behind the 9/11 ter­ror­ist attacks and  is try­ing to strip Amer­i­cans of their rights, espe­cially their rights to free speech and to own firearms.

  • The Tra­di­tion­al­ist Worker Party is an anti-Semitic, white suprema­cist group run by Matthew Heim­bach and Matt Par­rott.  They report­edly filed per­mits to march in Cleve­land but later announced alter­na­tive plans. Heim­bach showed up out­side the con­ven­tion any­way, voic­ing his dis­ap­proval for Trump, whose poli­cies “don’t go far enough” in advanc­ing white nation­al­ism, and urg­ing fol­low­ers to write in George Lin­coln Rock­well, founder of the Amer­i­can Nazi Party.

  • West­boro Bap­tist Church: Five mem­bers of the ven­omously anti-gayand anti-Semitic Kansas church plan to be in Cleve­land to protest the Repub­li­can Party and to warn atten­dees of the “immi­nent judgment”
    Westboro Baptist Church members at a protest

    West­boro Bap­tist Church mem­bers at a protest

    fac­ing the United States. WBC mem­bers are best known for pick­et­ing the funer­als of fallen U.S. sol­diers, car­ry­ing signs cel­e­brat­ing their deaths (because God hates America’s evil ways). Mem­bers of the church are equal oppor­tu­nity big­ots: They also plan to protest at the Demo­c­ra­tic National Con­ven­tion in Philadel­phia. Expect to see them car­ry­ing their usual signs – express­ing their bound­less, unmoored hatred for every­thing from gay rights to Israel.

  • Blood and Hon­our USA: This racist skin­head group is the Amer­i­can chap­ter of a loose inter­na­tional con­fed­er­a­tion of hard­core racist skin­heads.  Some mem­bers of Blood and Hon­our USA have in the past com­mit­ted vio­lent acts.  One of the group’s lead­ers announced on social media that he and a num­ber of other mem­bers would be in Cleve­land sup­port­ing Trump and wear­ing t-shirts bear­ing the Totenkopf (death’s head) – a sym­bol used by the SS in World War II.

    William Johnson of American Freedom Party

    William John­son of Amer­i­can Free­dom Party

  • Amer­i­can Free­dom Party: This white suprema­cist group is headed by attor­ney William John­son. John­son made head­lines in the spring of 2016 with his “robo­calls” to vot­ers in cru­cial pri­mary states, entreat­ing peo­ple to “defend the white race” by vot­ing for Trump, and again in May when it was revealed that he was on the list of Trump del­e­gates for Cal­i­for­nia. Blam­ing a “data­base error,” the Trump cam­paign removed John­son from its list, but AFP responded with this glee­ful Face­book mes­sage:  “…here’s what they don’t know: we have more delegates!”
  • David Riden (Trump del­e­gate from Ten­nessee): Mem­ber of the anti-government Patriot Move­ment. Riden has said he believes mem­bers of the cur­rent U.S. gov­ern­ment deserve to be killed for “abus­ing the Constitution.”
  • Jim Sta­chowiak:  Mem­ber of the anti-government Patriot Move­ment. This right-wing, rabidly anti-Muslim extrem­ist from Geor­gia will be in Cleve­land to sup­port Don­ald Trump, and has called upon “all mil­i­tary vet­er­ans, law enforce­ment vet­er­ans, fol­lowed by three-percenters, patri­ots,” to “come law­fully armed with lethal and non-lethal weaponry,” has advo­cated for Mecca to be bombed, and has made not par­tic­u­larly veiled threats against Black Lives Mat­ter activists, whom he refers to as “ter­ror­ists.”  Sta­chowiak, a for­mer uni­ver­sity pub­lic safety offi­cer turned mili­tia fan boy and online radio host, has been arrested sev­eral times.

    malik-zulu-shabazz-hashim-nzinga-charleston-south-carolina-june-2015-350x234

    The New Black Pan­ther Party at a protest in Charleston, South Carolina

  • The New Black Pan­ther Party: The NBPP will be in Cleve­land to protest against Don­ald Trump. In the days lead­ing up to the con­ven­tion, the pro­foundly anti-Semitic, black supremacy group will hold a series of protests and work­shops in part­ner­ship with Black Lawyers for Jus­tice, which is headed by for­mer NBPP leader (and cur­rent “spir­i­tual advi­sor”) Malik Zulu Shabazz. The NBPP, which is known for its calls for vio­lence against law enforce­ment, has announced plans to carry guns dur­ing its protests in Cleve­land. The New Black Pan­ther Party is not affil­i­ated with the orig­i­nal Black Pan­ther Party, whose mem­bers have harshly crit­i­cized the NBPP for “hijack­ing” the orig­i­nal group’s message.
  • Anti-Muslim activsts: Pro-LGBT con­ser­v­a­tive activists are host­ing a party called “Wake Up“ at the Repub­li­can Con­ven­tion in Cleve­land on July 19. The event will fea­ture anti-Muslim extrem­ist Pamela Geller and Milo Yiannopou­los, a con­tro­ver­sial fig­ure who report­edly made anti-Semitic com­ments in the past about Jew­ish con­trol of banks and the media. Other fea­tured speak­ers include Geert Wilders, a well-known anti-Muslim Dutch politi­cian, and Ann Coul­ter, a polit­i­cal com­men­ta­tor known for her extreme anti-immigrant posi­tion. Accord­ing to a post on the per­sonal blog of Pamela Geller, “The party is the out­come of dis­cus­sions among a group of gay Repub­li­cans fol­low­ing the tragic mas­sacre at a gay night­club in Orlando in June.” This appears to be an attempt to pro­mote an anti-Muslim agenda among this group of pro-LGBT conservatives.
  • The Oath Keep­ers will be on the ground in Cleve­land, osten­si­bly to “help” patrol the area, as they did with long guns dur­ing the protests in Fer­gu­son, Mis­souri, fol­low­ing the shoot­ing death of Michael Brown. The anti-government extrem­ist group’s web­site has denounced “rad­i­cals’” plans to protest at the con­ven­tion, and calls for vol­un­teers to par­tic­i­pate in “Oper­a­tion North Coast,” an “intel­li­gence gath­er­ing” effort. This hyper-militarized lan­guage is typ­i­cal of the Oath Keep­ers, who recruit from the mil­i­tary and law enforce­ment in their efforts to build a force capa­ble of resist­ing “gov­ern­ment overreach.”

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June 22, 2016 24

Arrested Homeland Security Analyst Had History of Anti-Government Opinions

JonathanWienkeAn ana­lyst with the Depart­ment of Home­land Security’s Office of Intel­li­gence and Analy­sis was arrested after a June 9 inci­dent at DHS head­quar­ters in Wash­ing­ton, D.C., when secu­rity per­son­nel per­form­ing ran­dom secu­rity checks allegedly dis­cov­ered that Jonathan Wienke was car­ry­ing a con­cealed hand­gun, as well as a knife, pep­per spray, hand­cuffs, and other items. Wienke was charged with car­ry­ing a pis­tol with­out a license.

How­ever, accord­ing to news reports, sub­se­quently filed court doc­u­ments indi­cate that inves­ti­ga­tors believe that Wienke may have been “con­spir­ing with another to com­mit work­place vio­lence, and more par­tic­u­larly may have been con­spir­ing or plan­ning to com­mit vio­lence against senior DHS offi­cials in the build­ing.” Wienke’s res­i­dence has been searched and an inves­ti­ga­tion is ongoing.

Wienke has worked as a “man­age­ment & pro­gram ana­lyst” for DHS since 2010; prior to that, he served in the U.S. Army as well as the U.S. Air Force, and worked as a pro­gram­mer and net­work admin­is­tra­tor. His hob­bies and inter­ests have included pho­tog­ra­phy, radios, elec­tron­ics, cryp­tog­ra­phy and, per­haps more than any­thing else, firearms.

A self-described “gun nut,” Wienke not only col­lected and shot firearms, but built, cus­tomized and re-built guns as well, offer­ing advice on the sub­ject on the many gun-related Inter­net dis­cus­sion forums he belonged to. In Feb­ru­ary 2016, Wienke claimed to have built “a double-digit num­ber of AR-15s” from parts.

Wienke’s attach­ment to firearms over the past 20+ years seems to have led him at times to some fairly hos­tile atti­tudes towards the fed­eral government—ironic, con­sid­er­ing his his­tory of employ­ment. In the 1990s, Wienke was a pro­lific poster to the Cypher­punks mail­ing list, which con­tained a num­ber of anti-government extrem­ists (many of them so-called “crypto-anarchists,” angry at 1990s-era gov­ern­ment restric­tions on cryp­tog­ra­phy), includ­ing James Bell, the sov­er­eign cit­i­zen and tax-protester author of the infa­mous essay “Assas­si­na­tion Pol­i­tics,” about killing gov­ern­ment employees.

On the Cypher­punks mail­ing list, Wienke fre­quently equated gun con­trol mea­sures with tyranny and total­i­tar­i­an­ism and seemed to sym­pa­thize with at least some anti-government con­spir­acy the­o­ries. In 1996, he repeated a fab­ri­cated quo­ta­tion pur­port­edly from Hitler about “full gun reg­is­tra­tion” being achieved in Nazi Ger­many in 1935 and asked “1935 Ger­many = 1996 U.S.?” In 1997, Wienke ref­er­enced Shirley Allen, an elderly woman from Illi­nois who became a cause célèbre for the mili­tia move­ment in the 1990s for her stand­off with local law enforce­ment who came to escort her to a court-ordered men­tal eval­u­a­tion. Wienke claimed that peo­ple who opposed the gov­ern­ment could be sub­jected to what he called “psy­chi­atric imbal­ance alle­ga­tion” attacks. In Jan­u­ary 2000, Wienke urged oth­ers to watch the movie “Waco: Rules of Engage­ment,” a con­spir­a­to­r­ial doc­u­men­tary about the 1993 Branch David­ian stand­off that puts forth the the­ory that the fed­eral gov­ern­ment delib­er­ately mas­sa­cred the Davidians.

When one Cypher­punk list sub­scriber asked in 1998 why so many peo­ple on the list focused on guns, Wienke replied in terms of using vio­lence against the government:

InfoWar has always been a crit­i­cal com­po­nent of Meat­War. Know­ing who your enemy is and where he is at makes it much eas­ier to do some­thing about him. Intel­li­gence (in the mil­i­tary sense) and the tools to deny it to your enemy (strong crypto) are of equal impor­tance to weapons. If you know that a homi­ci­dal Postal Ser­vice employee is stand­ing out­side your front door and is prepar­ing to blast it off its hinges and then kill you, this intel­li­gence will do noth­ing but raise your blood pres­sure if you have no weapons with which to deal with the sit­u­a­tion. (Call­ing 911 isn’t going to help you much.) If you own sev­eral “assault weapons”, but are asleep in the liv­ing room when the door comes crash­ing down, the lack of intel will greatly reduce the effec­tive­ness of said weapons.

I have an equa­tion for this: Effec­tive­ness = Intel­li­gence * Force * Will. I define force as the the­o­ret­i­cal abil­ity to inflict dam­age on an oppo­nent, whether via bad PR, pro­pa­ganda, lethal or non­lethal weapons, or any other means. Force has 2 com­po­nents: Materiel and Skill. Thus, Force = Materiel * Skill. (Exam­ple: If I own a riot shot­gun and appro­pri­ate ammu­ni­tion, and have taken it to the range and famil­iar­ized myself with its use, I have the the­o­ret­i­cal abil­ity to shoot the afore­men­tioned Homi­ci­dal Postal Employee, but mere own­er­ship of the weapon and skill in its use does not guar­an­tee that out­come.) Will is sim­ply the will to fight if nec­es­sary.

Although gov­ern­ment will always have a higher Force fac­tor than an indi­vid­ual or “the cypher­punks” or a mili­tia, it can be pos­si­ble to achieve a higher Effec­tive­ness score via higher Intel­li­gence and/or Will fac­tors. This is how we lost the war in Viet­nam. We had a much higher Force level than the VC, com­pa­ra­ble Intel­li­gence lev­els, but a much lower Will ratio (at least at the upper decision-making lev­els). Because of this, our Force assets were bound under all sorts of bizarre restric­tions which ham­pered their use­ful­ness, and we ulti­mately left in defeat.

In 1997, Wienke coun­seled another Cypher­punk against pro­vok­ing a con­fronta­tion with the “JBT’s” (“Jack Booted Thugs,” a ref­er­ence to law enforce­ment), because the gov­ern­ment could use such inci­dents against activists. On the other hand, Wienke wrote, if one has never threat­ened any­one before “and sev­eral armed indi­vid­u­als kick in your door and you shoot them, you can look much more right­eous in the media than if you are con­stantly call­ing for the deaths of thou­sands.” But if the sit­u­a­tion were not avoid­able, Wienke added, “then ‘Give me lib­erty or give me death!’ (In either case, pass the ammo.)”

In a sim­i­lar post, Wienke noted that “the peo­ple can still pro­tect them­selves from jack-booted thugs if they are suf­fi­ciently well-armed. This means own­ing assault weapons. Get them while you can, they’re going fast…and LOTS of ammunition.”

Some of Wienke’s posts to the Cypher­punks list also spoke about using vio­lence against “gang mem­bers” and “wel­fare leeches,” phrases that may have been racist euphemisms about non-whites. Many years later, in 2013, Wienke made a post to Face­book defend­ing George Zim­mer­man for killing Trayvon Mar­tin and claim­ing that the “real tragedy” was a “rush to judg­ment” by the media “and the pro­fes­sional insti­ga­tors of racial dis­cord,” by which Wienke meant peo­ple such as Jesse Jack­son and Al Sharp­ton, refer­ring to them as “racial hate­mon­gers” who stoked some­thing “just as ugly and vile as any cross burned in a front yard.”

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