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April 1, 2014 2

Anti-Immigrant Movement Pushes State Strategies In 2014

While the push for immi­gra­tion reform at the fed­eral level is cur­rently at a stand­still, the immi­gra­tion debate at the state and local level is in high gear. Con­tin­u­ing the trend of the past few years, law­mak­ers are intro­duc­ing large num­bers of pro-immigrant leg­is­la­tion in states around the country.dc-march-for-jobs-380

In response, the anti-immigrant move­ment is imple­ment­ing a multi-pronged strat­egy at the state and local level with sev­eral key goals in mind.  These include attempts to block leg­is­la­tion at the state level grant­ing in-state tuition to qual­i­fied stu­dents, as well as driver’s licenses and other pub­lic ben­e­fits to Deferred Action for Child­hood Arrivals (DACA) recip­i­ents. In June 2012, Pres­i­dent Obama issued the DACA exec­u­tive order, which allows some eli­gi­ble undoc­u­mented youth who were not born in the U.S. but who were brought to the coun­try at a young age to apply for tem­po­rary work autho­riza­tion, and calls for ICE agents to refrain from deport­ing them.

The anti-immigrant move­ment is also going beyond try­ing to pre­vent pro-immigrant leg­is­la­tion. Activists in the move­ment are attempt­ing to get restric­tive laws and poli­cies on the books such as greater voter reg­is­tra­tion restric­tions in the form of voter ID require­ments and English-only laws at the state and local level.

Please see “Anti-Immigrant Move­ment Imple­ments Nativist State Strate­gies in 2014” for more information.

 


El movimiento anti-inmigrante pro­mueve las estrate­gias estatales en 2014

Mien­tras que el impulso a la reforma migra­to­ria a nivel fed­eral está actual­mente fre­nado, el debate sobre la inmi­gración en el nivel local y estatal está en plena mar­cha. Con­tin­uando la ten­den­cia de los últi­mos años, los leg­is­ladores están intro­duciendo numerosas leyes en favor de los inmi­grantes en esta­dos de  todo el país.

En respuesta, el movimiento anti-inmigrante está imple­men­tando una estrate­gia mul­ti­facética a nivel estatal y local con var­ios obje­tivos en mente.  Estos incluyen inten­tos para blo­quear leyes a nivel estatal con­ce­di­endo tar­i­fas de matrícula estatal a estu­di­antes cal­i­fi­ca­dos, así como licen­cias de con­ducir y otros ben­efi­cios públi­cos a quienes cumplen los req­ui­si­tos del Deferred Action for Child­hood Arrivals (Aplaza­miento de Acciones con­tra Menores)(DACA). En junio de 2012, el Pres­i­dente Obama emi­tió la orden ejec­u­tiva DACA que per­mite a algunos jóvenes indoc­u­men­ta­dos que no nacieron en Esta­dos Unidos pero lle­garon al país a una edad tem­prana solic­i­tar per­miso de tra­bajo tem­po­ral  y pide a los agentes del ICE  que se absten­gan de deportarlos .

El movimiento anti-inmigrante tam­bién va más allá al tratar de evi­tar la leg­is­lación pro-inmigrantes. Los activis­tas del movimiento inten­tan imple­men­tar leyes y políti­cas restric­ti­vas tales como may­ores restric­ciones en la inscrip­ción de votantes en forma de req­ui­si­tos de iden­ti­fi­cación de votantes y leyes para que se util­ice úni­ca­mente el inglés a nivel local y estatal.

Para mayor infor­ma­ción, por favor con­sulte “Anti-Immigrant Move­ment Imple­ments Nativist State Strate­gies in 2014”.

 

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March 21, 2014 0

Anti-Immigrant Think Tank Appoints Bay Buchanan To Board

bay buchananThe Cen­ter for Immi­gra­tion Stud­ies (CIS), an anti-immigrant think tank founded by racist John Tan­ton, recently appointed Bay Buchanan, an anti-immigrant fig­ure with ties to extrem­ists, to its board of directors.

Buchanan is the pres­i­dent of The Amer­i­can Cause, a group founded by her brother, Pat Buchanan, a racist and anti-Semite. Though the orga­ni­za­tion is cur­rently dor­mant, it hosted a num­ber of anti-immigrant gath­er­ings in the past fea­tur­ing racist speakers.

For exam­ple, in Jan­u­ary 2009 the orga­ni­za­tion held an event when it released a report on the impact of can­di­dates’ views on immi­gra­tion dur­ing the 2008 elec­tion. Pan­elists included Bay Buchanan, Peter Brimelow, a white suprema­cist and founder of the racist anti-immigrant web­site VDARE, and Mar­cus Epstein, founder of the now-defunct far-right Robert Taft Club. The Taft Club often invited racist speak­ers to address its gath­er­ings, includ­ing white suprema­cist Jared Tay­lor, founder of The New Cen­tury Foun­da­tion, a self –styled think tank known pri­mar­ily for Amer­i­can Renais­sance , a white suprema­cist jour­nal and com­pan­ion website.

After Mar­cus Epstein was arrested and pleaded guilty to sim­ple assault for attack­ing an African Amer­i­can woman in Wash­ing­ton, D.C., Buchanan defended him in a col­umn pub­lished by VDARE titled “The Inter­net Lynch­ing of Mar­cus Epstein.” Buchanan also con­tributed an arti­cle to The Social Con­tract (TSC) an anti-immigrant jour­nal edited by white suprema­cist Wayne Lut­ton. At the 2011 Con­ser­v­a­tive Polit­i­cal Action Con­fer­ence (CPAC), Buchanan spoke on a panel spon­sored by the now-defunct racist stu­dent group Youth for West­ern Civ­i­liza­tion (YWC) titled “Will Immi­gra­tion Kill the GOP?”  Kevin DeAnna, the founder of YWC, was also on the panel. In 2005, Buchanan was a guest on the racist radio pro­gram The Polit­i­cal Cesspool, hosted by white suprema­cist James Edwards.

Buchanan also served as chair for her brother’s three pres­i­den­tial cam­paigns and in 2008, was a senior advi­sor to for­mer Col­orado con­gress­man Tom Tan­credo, who is known for his anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim rhetoric.  Buchanan also ran the now-defunct Team Amer­ica Polit­i­cal Action Com­mit­tee (PAC) founded by Tancredo.

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March 7, 2014 5

Anti-Immigrant Movement Dealt Three Major Blows In One Day

Ear­lier this week, two U.S. Supreme Court orders and a set­tle­ment agree­ment out of South Car­olina dealt major blows to the anti-immigrant movement’s agenda.supreme-court-east-facade

On March 3, the Supreme Court declined to hear appeals by the cities of Hazle­ton, Penn­syl­va­nia, and Farm­ers Branch, Texas, let­ting stand lower court rul­ings that had struck down both cities’ anti-immigrant ordi­nances.  Hazle­ton and Farm­ers Branch gained national noto­ri­ety when they passed ordi­nances bar­ring undoc­u­mented immi­grants from rent­ing prop­erty in the towns. 

In both cases, lower courts struck down the ordi­nances as uncon­sti­tu­tional and pre­empted by fed­eral law.  The Supreme Court’s orders deny­ing the appeals requests end the legal bat­tles, which have been ongo­ing since 2006, and secure a per­ma­nent vic­tory for immi­gra­tion and civil rights groups. 

On the same day as the Supreme Court’s orders, South Car­olina offi­cials set­tled a law­suit with immi­grant and civil rights groups over the state’s anti-immigrant laws.  In 2011 South Car­olina passed a law sim­i­lar to Arizona’s SB 1070 that, among other things, required local law enforce­ment to inves­ti­gate people’s immi­gra­tion sta­tus if they had rea­son to believe the per­son was undocumented. 

The pro­vi­sion, com­monly known as “papers please,” effec­tively required local law enforce­ment offi­cers to func­tion as immi­gra­tion enforcers.  In a let­ter sub­mit­ted to the court signed jointly by the Attor­ney Gen­eral and the Solic­i­tor Gen­eral, ear­lier this week South Car­olina agreed that local law enforce­ment would not hold peo­ple purely to deter­mine immi­gra­tion sta­tus.  The let­ter fur­ther con­ceded that the law does not per­mit state and local offi­cials to arrest or hold any­one believed to be undoc­u­mented “for any pur­pose, even to trans­fer the indi­vid­ual to fed­eral custody.”

The Supreme Court orders and South Car­olina set­tle­ment are major defeats for the anti-immigrant move­ment and its “attri­tion through enforce­ment” agenda. In the early to mid-2000s, the move­ment crafted this agenda, also known as “self-deportation.”

The goal was to make life so dif­fi­cult for immi­grants that they would “self-deport” from the city or state and move to another, or ulti­mately back to their coun­try of ori­gin.  Kris Kobach, the Kansas sec­re­tary of state and a lawyer with the Immi­gra­tion Reform Law Insti­tute (IRLI), the legal arm of the extreme anti-immigrant orga­ni­za­tion Fed­er­a­tion for Amer­i­can Immi­gra­tion Reform (FAIR), is the mas­ter­mind behind attri­tion through enforce­ment and one of the lead­ers pro­mot­ing the agenda today. Kobach helped to draft and defend the ordi­nances in Farm­ers Branch, Hazel­ton, and many other cities as well as Arizona’s SB 1070 law.

The Supreme Court orders and South Car­olina set­tle­ment are part of a wider trend of defeat for the anti-immigrant move­ment.   Since the begin­ning of 2013 there has been a major decline in anti-immigrant leg­is­la­tion intro­duced at the state level nation­wide. Pro-immigrant leg­is­la­tion is on the rise and the anti-immigrant move­ment is on the defense, attempt­ing to stop this influx of leg­is­la­tion instead of con­tin­u­ing to draft “attri­tion through enforce­ment” bills. These lat­est devel­op­ments send a clear mes­sage to the anti-immigrant move­ment and state and local leg­is­la­tors that anti-immigrant leg­is­la­tion not only divides com­mu­ni­ties but it does not hold up in court.

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