internet » ADL Blogs
Posts Tagged ‘internet’
March 31, 2015 1

Rival Hackers Overcome Differences For Anti-Israel Cyber Campaign

Update — 4/2/15: For more infor­ma­tion on OpIs­rael, please see Hack­ers Directly Threaten Indi­vid­ual Israeli Cit­i­zens.

What has become an annual cyber cam­paign against Israel, “OpIs­rael” – which coin­cided with Holo­caust Remem­brance Day in pre­vi­ous years – is once again tak­ing place this year; this time, by a broader coali­tion of hack­ers than ever before.AnonGhost OpIsrael 2015

In light of the uptick in attacks against Jew­ish insti­tu­tional web­sites in the U.S. by inter­na­tional hack­ing groups over the past few years, both Israeli and Jew­ish web­sites world­wide are expected to be tar­gets of the cyber campaign.

In 2014, “OpIs­rael” was pri­mar­ily led by an Arab sub-division of Anony­mous, which called for a cyber-attack against Israel on Holo­caust Remem­brance Day, threat­ening to launch “elec­tronic attacks against as many Israeli web­sites as pos­si­ble.” The group also threat­ened Israeli cit­i­zens: “Your credit cards, your bank accounts, your servers … are ALL in a dan­ger!” In 2013, the group called for a sim­i­lar cam­paign timed with Holo­caust Remem­brance Day to “wipe Israel off the Inter­net.”

This year, the Arab sub-division of Anony­mous, in one of the videos it posted on YouTube, described “OpIs­rael,” as an “Elec­tronic Holocaust.”

There are strong indi­ca­tions, how­ever, that AnonG­host, a promi­nent hacker group known for tar­get­ing Jew­ish and Amer­i­can web­sites, is seek­ing to replace Anony­mous in spear­head­ing “OpIsrael.”

For exam­ple, ear­lier this month, AnonG­host launched and pro­moted soft­ware enabling users to con­duct cyber-attacks against Israeli (and other) tar­gets. The soft­ware appears to enable users to ini­ti­ate denial of ser­vice (DOS) attacks. AnonG­host has already claimed respon­si­bil­ity for the hack­ing of sev­eral Israeli web­sites in the past week in the lead up to “OpIsrael.”

On March 31, AnonG­host mem­bers claimed that they started mes­sag­ing Israeli cit­i­zens with warn­ings about OpIs­rael. The threat­en­ing mes­sages included an image of an ISIS fighter with the cap­tion, “We are com­ing O Jews to kill you.” Under the image, AnonG­host mem­bers intro­duce them­selves and ask the recip­i­ents to deliver the warn­ing to the Israeli government.

An image of the threatening message sent to Israeli citizens featuring an ISIS fighter

An image of the threat­en­ing mes­sage sent to Israeli cit­i­zens fea­tur­ing an ISIS fighter

By inject­ing itself into “OpIs­rael,” AnonG­host may take the cam­paign into a more extreme direc­tion. For exam­ple, AnonG­host has been unam­bigu­ous about sup­port­ing ISIS and has car­ried out hacks on its behalf. This activ­ity dif­fers from the Anony­mous col­lec­tive, which has launched cyber-campaigns to counter ISIS’ online pres­ence. In Jan­u­ary 2015, for exam­ple, they­launched a cam­paign against Jihadist web­sites titled OpChar­lieHebdo in response to ter­ror­ist attacks in France.

There are indi­ca­tions that AnonG­host and the broader Anony­mous col­lec­tive have even engaged in a cyber-conflict against each other; Mau­ri­ta­nia Attacker, the osten­si­ble leader of AnonG­host, claims to have hacked a group of Anony­mous mem­bers known as “Anony­mous Squad No.035,” the Ser­bian sub-division of Anonymous.Anonymous OpIsrael 2015

The appar­ent con­flict between AnonG­host and the Anony­mous col­lec­tive, how­ever, does not seem to have pre­vented them both from par­tic­i­pat­ing in this year’s “OpIs­rael.” Oppo­si­tion to Israel seems to be a com­mon cause.

It is impor­tant to note that ADL is cur­rently unaware of any spe­cific cyber threat to the Amer­i­can Jew­ish com­mu­nity. Nev­er­the­less, we are urg­ing Jew­ish com­mu­ni­ties to revisit and reassess their cyber-security plans, mea­sures, and procedures.

Related Infor­ma­tion:

ADL Alerts U.S. Syn­a­gogues to Pro­tect Against Online Hackers

ISIS Estab­lishes A Cyber-Alliance With Anti-Israel Hackers

Hack­ers Post Anti-Semitism On U.S. Uni­ver­si­ties’ Websites

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

March 18, 2015 2

NJ Man Arrested For Trying to Join ISIS Espoused Anti-Semitism Online

Tairod Pugh

Tairod Pugh

A New Jer­sey man, indicted yes­ter­day for attempt­ing to join the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), marks the 12th U.S. res­i­dent charged with sup­port­ing or join­ing Islamic extrem­ism this year and demon­strates the pres­ence of anti-Semitism and role of online pro­pa­ganda in the rad­i­cal­iza­tion process.

Tairod Nathan Web­ster Pugh is a U.S. cit­i­zen and for­mer air force mechanic from Nep­tune, NJ. He allegedly attempted to travel to join ISIS in Jan­u­ary but was detained and sent back to the U.S. by Egypt­ian offi­cials. Pugh was arrested on Jan­u­ary 16, 2015, upon his return to the U.S., but the charges were made pub­lic fol­low­ing yesterday’s indictment.

Pugh’s Face­book pro­file included mul­ti­ple anti-Semitic and anti-Israel posts as well as posts sup­port­ing Hamas.

In July 2014, Pugh wrote a post that stated, in part, “All the evil done by the Jews came from within them­selves. On the day of Judg­ment full respon­si­bil­ity of the starv­ing, tor­ture, jail­ing and killing of inno­cent Mus­lims will rest upon there (sic) shoul­ders. Allah must really hate them to give the rope to hang them­selves,” and posted an image with text stat­ing, “Most Jews do not like to admit it, but our G-d is Lucifer.” In August 2014, he shared an image that ref­er­enced blood libel accu­sa­tions, depict­ing Israeli Prime Min­is­ter Ben­jamin Netanyahu slit­ting the throats of sleep­ing children.

Pugh also posted sev­eral car­toons equat­ing Jews, Israel or Zion­ists to Nazis, as well as mul­ti­ple images claim­ing to depict Israeli war crimes.

An anti-Semitic post on Tairod Pugh's Facebook page.

An anti-Semitic post on Tairod Pugh’s Face­book page.

Although Pugh did not pub­licly post his sup­port for ISIS, he did share a quote by ter­ror pro­pa­gan­dist Anwar al-Awlaki in August 2014. Awlaki is fre­quently cited as an inspi­ra­tion for extrem­ism by Amer­i­cans who have been linked to terrorism.

Pugh allegedly also used his com­puter to research join­ing ISIS and watch ISIS pro­pa­ganda videos. An inves­ti­ga­tion report­edly found that he had used the inter­net to search for the terms, “bor­ders con­trolled by Islamic state,” “who con­trols kobani (a city that has been con­tested by ISIS),” “kobani bor­der cross­ing,” and “jarablus bor­der cross­ing,” and the feature-film length ter­ror pro­pa­ganda video “Flames of War,” which depicts and apoc­a­lyp­tic strug­gle between ISIS and the West. He had also allegedly viewed a chart of cross­ing points between Turkey and Syria and had down­loaded at least one ISIS exe­cu­tion video, along with other ISIS videos.

Addi­tional Face­book posts by Pugh demon­strated anti-U.S. sen­ti­ment. One post from August 2014, taken from Iran­ian con­trolled media out­let Press TV, depicted pro­test­ers burn­ing an effigy of Pres­i­dent Barack Obama. A post ear­lier that month included an arti­cle that Pugh wrote describ­ing “the rape of a Mus­lim woman by the Amer­i­can forces.” Accord­ing to media reports, some Face­book posts not pub­licly avail­able also expressed Pugh’s desire to never return to the U.S.

Pugh also shared images prais­ing the ter­ror group Hamas. In August 2014, he shared an appar­ent image of Hamas mil­i­tants “returned safely after 21 days of siege.” In July 2014, he shared a photo of Hamas mil­i­tants with the cap­tion, “Thank you! You make us proud …”

The 12 U.S. res­i­dents charged with Islamic extrem­ism related ter­ror offenses this year have been arrested in 7 dif­fer­ent states includ­ing New Jer­sey, New York, Illi­nois, Ohio, Vir­ginia, Indi­ana and Mis­souri. Pugh is also the 31st Amer­i­can res­i­dent pub­licly linked to ISIS since 2014.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

February 27, 2015 2

ISIS Propaganda Videos Showcased on IS-Tube

IS-Tube

IS-Tube

Update — 3/3/15: ADL con­tacted Twit­ter about the asso­ci­ated han­dle. It has since been removed. 

Update — 2/27/15: ADL con­tacted Google about the web­site this morn­ing. It has since been removed. 

A web­site call­ing itself IS-Tube, pro­vid­ing access to an archive of Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) pro­pa­ganda videos, is the lat­est exam­ple of ISIS’ sophis­ti­cated social media com­mu­ni­ca­tion and recruit­ment strate­gies, which have influ­enced a diverse group of peo­ple from around the world, includ­ing from the United States, through­out 2014.

The web­site fea­tures a large col­lec­tion of pro­pa­ganda videos cre­ated by offi­cial ISIS media out­lets, includ­ing ISIS’s feature-length film Flames of War, which presents an apoc­a­lyp­tic strug­gle between the ter­ror­ist group and the West, and the recent video show­ing the mur­der of Jor­dan­ian pilot Moaz al-Kasasbeh, who was cap­tured by ISIS and burned to death.

Vis­i­tors to the site can search for the videos they want to find via a search bar, or via drop-down menus that cat­e­go­rize videos by nar­ra­tor - for exam­ple, ISIS leader Abu Bakr al Bagh­dadi or spokesman Abu Muhamed al Adnani – or by media group, includ­ing ISIS’s Al Hayat, Al Iti­sam, Furqan Media and Ajnad Media. Videos can also be searched by coun­try of origin.

The coun­try of ori­gin search includes Syria, Iraq, Libya, Yemen, Alge­ria, the Afghanistan region, Saudi Ara­bia and the Sinai, demon­strat­ing ISIS’s expan­sive claims of influ­ence through­out the region.

IS-Tube, hosted on a Google-owned IP block and reg­is­tered to what appears to an address in Ams­ter­dam, is asso­ci­ated with a spe­cific Twit­ter han­dle,  which directed users to the web­page as part of a new hash­tag cam­paign launched on Feb­ru­ary 26. The cam­paign encour­ages sup­port­ers to send tweets with the hash­tag #Islam­ic­State­Me­dia or a cor­re­spond­ing Ara­bic hashtag.

A tweet advocating attacks in conjunction with the #IslamicStateMedia hashtag campaign

A tweet advo­cat­ing attacks in con­junc­tion with the #Islam­ic­State­Me­dia hash­tag campaign

Calls for attacks against West­ern coun­tries and for Mus­lims abroad to travel to join ISIS in the region have been promi­nent among the mes­sages being tweeted by ISIS sup­port­ers using #Islam­ic­State­Me­dia, as have tweets of ISIS mag­a­zines, videos and other pro­pa­ganda con­tent in addi­tion to IS-Tube. One ISIS sup­porter, for exam­ple, tweeted an image of Hyper Cacher, the kosher gro­cery store attacked in Paris in Jan­u­ary, with the words, “Jihad is the path for Par­adise. O’ lone wolf, another attack like Paris attack #IslamicStateMedia.”

ISIS has con­ducted sim­i­lar hash­tag cam­paigns in the past, which it uses both to mobi­lize sup­port­ers and to adver­tise spe­cific mes­sages. Fol­low­ing the attacks on the Char­lie Hebdo offices and a kosher super­mar­ket in France in Jan­u­ary, ISIS sup­port­ers used the hash­tag  #Fight­ForHim to cap­i­tal­ize on the press sur­round­ing the attacks and call for addi­tional vio­lence. In June and August 2014, ISIS ini­ti­ated hash­tag cam­paigns using the phrases #Calami­ty­Will­Be­fal­lUS and #AMes­sage­FromI­SIS­toUS that threat­ened the U.S. and its citizens.

The ADL’s Cyber-Safety Action Guide enables the com­mu­nity to reg­is­ter con­cerns with Inter­net ser­vice providers when they encounter ter­ror­ist con­tent online.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,