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January 3, 2014 3

Hezbollah Posts New Games Aimed At Youth

In a con­tin­u­a­tion of its effort to pro­mote its hate­ful mes­sages to chil­dren and cul­ti­vate the next gen­er­a­tion of ter­ror­ists, Hezbol­lah has updated the video game web­site it orig­i­nally cre­ated a month ago to include newer, more cartoon-like games geared toward even younger audiences.hezbollah-kids-games

The orig­i­nal games, released last month and still avail­able on the site, enabled play­ers to sim­u­late Hezbol­lah oper­a­tives as they reen­act var­i­ous bat­tles against Israeli forces. Since then, five games have been added:

  • Invaders Grave­yard, fea­tur­ing South Park-like car­toon fig­ures, pro­vides Angry Birds-style tar­get prac­tice against car­toons of Israeli sol­diers attempt­ing to enter Lebanon.
  • In the Heart of the Enemy has play­ers aim missile-shaped darts at a Jewish-star shaped dart board.
  • House of Spi­der, described on the web­site as teach­ing that, “The Zion­ist enemy is weaker than the house of the spi­der,” involves aim­ing a soc­cer ball with a Jew­ish star on it at a spi­der web and at var­i­ous prizes on the web.

The other two games, Lib­er­a­tion of Pris­on­ers and Destroy­ing the Enemy, were posted but not oper­a­tional as of this writing.

This new set of games may not be the last. The front page of Hezbollah’s games’ web­site encour­ages user inter­ac­tion, ask­ing play­ers to “join us” by email­ing “if you have an idea for a game.”

Hezbol­lah has cre­ated a num­ber of games geared at chil­dren through­out its his­tory. In 2003, it began sell­ing a game called “Spe­cial Force,” which was fol­lowed in 2007 by “Spe­cial Force 2.”  The cur­rent web­site is the first to fea­ture games for free online, and is specif­i­cally geared to “strengthen the cul­ture of resis­tance” among chil­dren “ages 11 and above.”

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December 5, 2013 0

Hezbollah Video Games Targeting Youth Promote War Against Israel

Hezbol­lah has launched a web­site for chil­dren “ages 11 and above” fea­tur­ing games that sim­u­late Hezbol­lah mis­sions against Israel from the ter­ror­ist orga­ni­za­tions per­spec­tive dat­ing back to 1982.hezbollah-video-game-adl

Play­ers can take part in sim­u­lated mis­sions from 1982, 1986, 1996, 1999 and 2000. The web­site says that “The games…are not ran­dom. Their goals are to strengthen the cul­ture of resistance.”

Each game is made up of three lev­els requir­ing play­ers to shoot with period-appropriate weapons rang­ing from machine guns to Katyusha rock­ets to tanks. Play­ers also under­take other actions such as fig­ur­ing out codes to dis­able radar and advanc­ing on tar­gets in the face of oppos­ing fire.

The web­site, launched in Novem­ber, also fea­tures videos pro­duced by Hezbollah’s satel­lite tele­vi­sion sta­tion Al Manar. The videos pro­vide play­ers with Hezbollah’s nar­ra­tives on the conflicts.

  • In the 1986 game, play­ers advance on a for­ti­fied hill to an Israeli out­post using a vari­ety of weapons until they are able to kill all the Israeli sol­diers, take con­trol of the out­post and seize ammu­ni­tion and equipment.
  • In the 1999 game, play­ers must first dis­able mon­i­tor­ing equip­ment before they can explode a road­side bomb to destroy a con­voy trans­port­ing Israeli Gen­eral Erez Gerstein.
  • The 2000 game involves fir­ing rock­ets into Israeli ter­ri­tory to kill Israeli sol­diers on patrol.

Hezbol­lah has pre­vi­ously pro­duced video games; in 2003, it began sell­ing a game called “Spe­cial Force,” which was fol­lowed in 2007 by “Spe­cial Force 2.” Both depicted attacks against Israelis. Hezbol­lah claimed that the orig­i­nal Spe­cial Force sold over 10,000 copies inter­na­tion­ally, in loca­tions rang­ing frospecial-force-hezbollahm Lebanon and Syria to Canada, Ger­many and Australia.

The new games, which are avail­able for free through Hezbollah’s main web­site, had attracted nearly 350 “likes” on an asso­ci­ated Face­book page, pri­mar­ily from Lebanese young adults aged 18–34, with many oth­ers likely play­ing directly on the web­site. The Face­book page was appar­ently removed on Decem­ber 3 or 4 but has since been recreated.

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December 3, 2013 0

Afghani Azan Magazine Picks Up Where Inspire Left Off

Azan Mag­a­zine, pro­duced by the pro-Taliban Abtalul Media Group since March 2013, mir­rors the tone and con­tent of other English-language pro­pa­ganda that has influ­enced many domes­tic ter­ror­ists over the past few years. azan-magazine-afghanistan-inspire-terrorism-adl

Azan is not only mod­eled after Inspire Mag­a­zine, Al Qaeda in the Ara­bian Peninsula’s English-language mag­a­zine, but may be attempt­ing to fill the gap left by Inspire, which has not pub­lished an issue since June.

The Fourth issue of Azan Mag­a­zine, 72-pages long and titled “To the Jihadis in the West,” was released this month. Like Inspire, this issue encour­ages vio­lence in the West, hatred of the United States and is filled with con­tent glo­ri­fy­ing a mil­i­tant Islamist ideology.

And like Inspire, Azan mag­a­zine also makes use of col­or­ful, infor­mal pages and arti­cles with dif­fer­ent approaches to encour­ag­ing extrem­ism, includ­ing quotes from reli­gious fig­ures and threats of pun­ish­ment to those who do not espouse rad­i­cal Islamist beliefs.

It includes “adver­tise­ments,” such as “A come-to-jihad ad” that depicts ter­ror­ists in front of a fiery back­drop with a quote from the Quran, and an image of the World Trade Cen­ter on 9/11 with an image of and quote by Osama bin Laden with text that reads: “A ‘9–11 We Remem­ber’ Ad.”

The mag­a­zine also has a sec­tion address­ing spe­cific con­cerns that might oth­er­wise stop would-be extrem­ists from com­mit­ting ter­ror­ist actions, sim­i­lar to Inspire’s question-and-answer sec­tions address­ing con­cerns about ter­ror­ism. It sim­i­larly includes an “Around the World” page about ter­ror­ism and anti-Western activ­ity world­wide, and pages ridi­cul­ing pres­i­dent Obama and crit­i­ciz­ing Amer­i­can policies.

Con­spic­u­ously absent is a sec­tion mir­ror­ing Inspire’s infa­mous “Open Source Jihad” with sug­gested attack meth­ods and weapons instruc­tions. Instead, Azan fea­tures a dia­gram of an extrem­ist on a motor­cy­cle, not­ing dif­fer­ent items that may be help­ful to him, includ­ing an Mp3 player “to lis­ten to the Qur’an” and “Rockets/Ammo” that can be “fit into the woolen blan­ket” that he sits on to pro­vide comfort.

This issue of Azan mag­a­zine closes with a solic­i­ta­tion for reader con­tri­bu­tions – again, fol­low­ing a trend of encour­ag­ing inter­ac­tion and par­tic­i­pa­tion through a vari­ety of medi­ums. “If you would like to con­tribute to the mag­a­zine or to the global Jihad against the crusader-zionist alliance – or if you would like to carry out Jihad on your home ter­ri­tory, con­tact us,” it says, fur­ther advis­ing read­ers to look back to their copies of Inspire for instruc­tions on send­ing encrypted emails.azan-ad-come-to-jihad

Also like Inspire, the pri­mary focus of Azan Mag­a­zine is domes­tic extrem­ism and attacks on West­ern soil. Such encour­age­ment has been down­played in recent months by for­eign ter­ror­ist orga­ni­za­tions such as Jab­hat al-Nusra and al-Shabaab, which have been encour­ag­ing Amer­i­cans and other West­ern­ers to join them abroad. But Azan makes very clear that domes­tic plots should be pri­or­i­tized over join­ing ter­ror groups abroad.

Abtalul Islam like­wise released its first English-subtitled video last month urg­ing West­ern­ers to con­tribute to its cause through a vari­ety of means, includ­ing through writ­ing, com­puter use and actual fighting.

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