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April 25, 2016 1

White Supremacist Events Coincide With Hitler’s Birth Week

Mark­ing the anniver­sary week of Adolf Hitler’s April 20th birth­day, sev­eral neo-Nazi and Klan groups held col­lab­o­ra­tive events over the week­end of April 23. Four such events were held within approx­i­mately 150 miles of one another in north Alabama and cen­tral Georgia.  adl-blog

  • The United Klans of Amer­ica (UKA) hosted a pri­vate event in Alabama which included a cross burn­ing and sev­eral Klan wed­dings.  The event was open to all mem­bers of the Black and Sil­ver alliance which con­sists of the UKA, the Sadis­tic Souls (an Illinois-based fac­tion of the neo-Nazi Aryan Nations), James Logsdon’s small fac­tion of the Cre­ativ­ity Move­ment, and Mis­souri and Ten­nessee mem­bers of the Right-Wing Resis­tance (a neo-Nazi group that orig­i­nated in New Zealand.)
  • The neo-Nazi National Social­ist Move­ment (NSM) hosted a rally at the Law Enforce­ment Cen­ter in Rome, Geor­gia. Approx­i­mately 100 peo­ple from var­i­ous white suprema­cist groups attended the event, includ­ing the North Carolina-based Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan and the Texas Rebel Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.  Other atten­dees included Arthur Jones (a long-time Illi­nois neo-Nazis and Holo­caust denier), Ted Dunn (leader of the SS Action group), and Eric Mead­ows, who has been linked to the neo-Confederate League of the South. The hate­ful rhetoric of rally speak­ers, who inter­mit­tently shouted “white power” and “Sieg Heil,” was largely drowned out by counter pro­test­ers. Two counter pro­test­ers were arrested for dis­or­derly conduct.
  • Approx­i­mately two dozen peo­ple par­tic­i­pated in a white power event at Georgia’s Stone Moun­tain Park. The poorly attended event, orga­nized by white suprema­cist John Michael Estes and Klans­man Greg Cal­houn, was intended to protest leg­is­la­tion that would allow changes to exist­ing Con­fed­er­ate dis­plays and mon­u­ments, as well as a plan by the Stone Moun­tain Memo­r­ial Asso­ci­a­tion to install a mon­u­ment in Mar­tin Luther King’s honor.  The small group held con­fed­er­ate flags and a ban­ner that read “Diver­sity = White Geno­cide.” Sev­eral counter-protesters threw rocks and fire­works at police, and set a bar­ri­cade on fire. At least eight counter-protesters were adewayne-stewartrrested and charged with vio­lat­ing Georgia’s mask law, and one was arrested for allegedly throw­ing smoke bombs at police.
  • On the evening of April 23, ral­liers from both the Rome and Stone Moun­tain events attended a pri­vate after-party near Tem­ple, Geor­gia. The event included white power music and the burn­ing of both a cross and a swastika.

These col­lab­o­ra­tive events demon­strate the will­ing­ness of some Klan groups to prac­tice a Naz­i­fied ver­sion of Klan ide­ol­ogy and to form sym­bi­otic rela­tion­ships with neo-Nazi groups.  With both the neo-Nazi move­ment and Klan move­ment in decline joint events can help mask the small num­bers that indi­vid­ual white suprema­cist groups are able to generate.

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March 2, 2016 1

While Vying For Attention, Small California Klan Encounters Conflict

The Loyal White Knights (LWK) had every inten­tion of hold­ing a “White Lives Do Mat­ter” protest on Sat­ur­day, Feb­ru­ary 27, 2016, at Pear­son Park in Ana­heim, Cal­i­for­nia. But before the event could kick off, a bloody brawl erupted between Klan sup­port­ers and counter-protesters.

Klans­men, barely able to exit their cars, were sud­denly swarmed by counter-protesters who wres­tled Bill Hagan, the Cal­i­for­nia LWK’s Grand Dragon, to the ground. Other Klan mem­bers were sim­i­larly attacked, and as the chaos con­tin­ued, Klan mem­bers stabbed three counter-protesters, appar­ently with the tip of a flag pole, leav­ing one crit­i­cally wounded.

Six Klans­men were arrested, but they were released on Feb­ru­ary 29, after law enforce­ment deter­mined they were act­ing in self-defense. Seven anti-Klan-protesters were booked by the Ana­heim Police Depart­ment on charges of assault with a deadly weapon and for elder abuse (after stomp­ing on a senior Klan member).

(At any poten­tially inflam­ma­tory protest, sep­a­rat­ing the pro­test­ers from any counter-demonstrators is crit­i­cal – it pro­tects even the most hate­ful speech while ensur­ing the safety of every­one involved. This sep­a­ra­tion was clearly not achieved – or main­tained – in Anaheim).

Like other Klan groups around the coun­try, the Loyal White Knights say they rep­re­sent the increas­ingly “endan­gered” white pop­u­la­tion, which they claim makes up a mere 9 per­cent of the world’s pop­u­la­tion. In fact, Klan groups them­selves appear to be the only “endan­gered” entity: The ADL has iden­ti­fied about thirty active Klan groups in the United States, slightly down from the 2014 tally. Most Klan groups range in size from small to very small; chap­ters are often com­prised of a sin­gle local member.

As a feint against their dimin­ish­ing influ­ence, Klan groups con­tinue to use attention-getting stunts to attract pub­lic­ity.  For exam­ple, in 2015 the Inter­na­tional Key­stone Knights made head­lines for appeal­ing an “adopt a high­way” court rul­ing in Geor­gia while the Knights Party drew media atten­tion after spon­sor­ing a pro-white bill­board in Arkansas.

The most com­mon Klan tac­tic, how­ever, con­tin­ues to be the use of fliers to broad­cast their racist, anti-Semitic, homo­pho­bic, and increas­ingly Islam­o­pho­bic mes­sage. In 2015, the ADL counted 85 Klan flier­ing inci­dents, an increase from 73 inci­dents in 2014.  In the last six months, the very small Cal­i­for­nia Loyal White Knights group has caused an out­sized stir in a num­ber of Cal­i­for­nia cities, includ­ing Whit­tier, Santa Ana and Ana­heim, as neigh­bors dis­cov­ered candy and rock-filled bags with pro-Klan mes­sages on their front lawns. As the Anti-Defamation League has pre­vi­ously noted, this leaflet­ing activ­ity is actu­ally a des­per­ate pub­lic­ity tac­tic, and reflects Klan groups’ declin­ing stature and membership.

Today’s Klan groups tend to be irres­olute, short-lived and in a con­stant state of flux.More than half of the cur­rently active Klans were formed just in the last five years. While a few long­stand­ing Klans, still exist, they are mere shad­ows of their for­mer selves. In fact, two promi­nent Klans dis­banded in Late 2015: Mor­ris Gulett’s Louisiana-based Aryan Nations Knights and Ron Edward’s Kentucky-based Impe­r­ial Klans of America.

As befits the groups’ shrink­ing ranks, pub­lic Klan events are increas­ingly rare. There were only two pub­lic Klan events of con­se­quence in 2015.  In July, mem­bers of the Loyal White Knights and the Trin­ity White Knights joined mem­bers of the neo-Nazi Nation­al­ist Social­ist Move­ment in protest­ing the removal of the Con­fed­er­ate flag from the South Car­olina State House.  In March, approx­i­mately 20 Klans­men ral­lied in Mont­gomery, Alabama, at an event hon­or­ing Mar­tin Luther King, Jr.

In the 1920s, accord­ing to some his­tor­i­cal accounts, Anaheim’s Pear­son Park was the site of events that attracted upwards of 20,000 Klan sup­port­ers. This past weekend’s protests and vio­lence involved six Klan sup­port­ers — and while that cer­tainly epit­o­mizes the state of today’s Klan, the group’s his­tor­i­cal bag­gage and unde­ni­able noto­ri­ety means that even one Klan mem­ber has the poten­tial to spark con­sid­er­able pain and upset.

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June 20, 2013 0

FBI Arrest Two In Bizarre Alleged Radiation Plot

FBI agents arrested two upstate New York men on June 18, charg­ing them with con­spir­ing to pro­vide mate­r­ial sup­port to ter­ror­ists for an alleged plot to build a “mobile, remotely oper­ated, radiation-emitting device” to kill peo­ple at a dis­tance with X-ray radi­a­tion.  Arrested were Glen­don Scott Craw­ford, 49, from Prov­i­dence, and Eric Feight, 54, from Stockport.

crawford-criminal-complaint

Selec­tion from crim­i­nal complaint

Accord­ing to the crim­i­nal com­plaint filed by the FBI in court, Craw­ford, with help from Feight, spent more than a year attempt­ing to obtain the com­po­nents for con­struct­ing such a radi­a­tion device, which they allegedly hoped to sell. To obtain money for financ­ing the con­struc­tion, Craw­ford allegedly approached both Jew­ish insti­tu­tions in New York (they quickly con­tacted the author­i­ties) as well as the Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan in North Carolina.

The crim­i­nal com­plaint alleges that Craw­ford him­self var­i­ously claimed to be or to have been a mem­ber of the United North­ern and South­ern Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, a Midwest-based Klan group that does not have an orga­nized pres­ence in New York, though it may have iso­lated mem­bers in the region. In recent years, Klan activ­ity in New York has been min­i­mal at best. Pub­licly, Craw­ford tended to align him­self not with white suprema­cist groups but with con­ser­v­a­tive and Tea Party causes and groups.

It is very unusual that a pur­ported Klan mem­ber would approach Jew­ish orga­ni­za­tions for help (espe­cially with regard to ille­gal activ­ity), but Crawford’s ire seems to have been directed pri­mar­ily at Mus­lims. The crim­i­nal com­plaint pro­vides a num­ber of alleged instances of anti-Muslim sen­ti­ments on the part of Craw­ford, as well as sug­ges­tions that Mus­lims (includ­ing a “Mus­lim orga­ni­za­tion”) were one of the intended targets. 

Other tar­gets allegedly dis­cussed included a “polit­i­cal party” and “a polit­i­cal fig­ure.”  The lat­ter two seem to have been the Demo­c­ra­tic Party and Barack Obama. Accord­ing to the crim­i­nal com­plaint, both Feight and Craw­ford inde­pen­dently made state­ments express­ing their unhap­pi­ness with the 2012 elec­tions. In April 2013, Craw­ford allegedly sent a text mes­sage to some­one in which he claimed that Obama (“your trea­so­nous bed­wet­ting mag­got in chief”) has been bring­ing Mus­lims (“muzzies”) into the United States with­out back­ground checks.  “This admin­is­tra­tion has done more to enable a gov­ern­ment spon­sored inva­sion than the press can cover up,” Craw­ford allegedly sent.

FBI agents were aware of Crawford’s alleged activ­i­ties from an early stage and brought in numer­ous under­cover agents and con­fi­den­tial informants—including allegedly a mem­ber of the Loyal White Knights—to act as pur­ported back­ers of Crawford’s plans.  At no point does it seem that Craw­ford and Feight had the means with which to con­struct a radi­a­tion weapon or use it.

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