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September 9, 2016

Who’s Who in White Lives Matter

WLM protest at NAACP office in Houston, Texas

WLM protest at NAACP office in Houston, Texas

In late August, around 20 so-called “White Lives Matter” (WLM) activists attracted national attention after staging an armed protest in front of the Houston, Texas, offices of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

A WLM spokesperson claimed that the extremists were there to protest against the purported failure of the NAACP to speak out against alleged “atrocities” committed by the Black Lives Matter movement.

When white supremacists toting assault rifles show up in front of NAACP offices, that’s news.  The incident understandably caused concern.  But what is White Lives Matter?  Is it a group?  A movement?  Just a slogan?

The best way to describe WLM might be as a network—a small network of hardcore white supremacists with connections to a variety of hate groups.  These extremists started organizing events and activities under the banner of “White Lives Matter,” regardless of what group or groups they actually belonged to.

The white supremacist movement in the United States has a history of this type of organizing; in 2012-2014, various white supremacists around the country engaged in similar activities as part of the so-called “South Africa Project” and related “White Genocide Project,” designed to raise awareness of purported (but actually fictional) “genocides” of whites in South Africa, the United States, and elsewhere.  WLM follows squarely in this tradition.

Most such campaigns fade away after a year or two, but because WLM is in effect an active white supremacist protest against Black Lives Matter, it theoretically has the potential to last as long as that movement does.  It is important to stress that the Black Lives Matter movement and the WLM network are in no way equivalent or comparable, either in size or the nature of their beliefs and goals.

White Lives Matter Activities

WLM fliers for distribution

WLM fliers for distribution

“White Lives Matter” began as a transparent white supremacist slogan designed to respond to the Black Lives Matter movement, a protest movement that emerged in late 2014.  No single person came up with the slogan; by early 2015, numerous white racists were already using “white lives matter” as an on-line rallying cry.

It did not take long before some white supremacists began to take the concept out into the physical world, with the distribution of WLM fliers in neighborhoods in Connecticut in April 2015.  Most WLM activities since then have taken place in Connecticut, Texas or California, with a few scattered incidents elsewhere.

White supremacist posting WLM handbill

White supremacist posting WLM handbill

WLM matters activities have typically taken the form of on-line promotion of white supremacy using the “White Lives Matter” slogan, organizing WLM protests and rallies, distributing WLM fliers, handbills or stickers, and releasing red balloons into the sky “for Caucasian victims.”  The latter takes place on a very small scale and is usually caught on video to use on the Internet.

White Lives Matter: The Cast of Characters

Dozens of white supremacists around the country have taken part in one or more WLM activities since 2015, but the network is not very large.

In fact, a small handful of individuals are responsible for conducting or organizing most of the on-line and real-world WLM activities.  The first to become active, in the spring of 2015, were Ken Zrallack from Connecticut and his friend, Travis Golie, who has recently lived in Texas and Georgia.

By late 2015, the Aryan Renaissance Society (ARS), a longstanding white supremacist group based primarily in Texas, had also begun promoting WLM—to the irritation of the others.  In October 2015, Golie groused about ARS, which he described as a “brand new self proclaimed group” and a “silly gang,” claiming they stole WLM materials and put their own logo on them.  The materials appear to have been transmitted through Rebecca Barnette.  Barnette herself is disliked by some other WLM activists.  California WLM activist Mellissa Dennis described Barnette in September 2016 as “a bottom feeder who wants attention.” A WLM facebook page apparently run by Zrallack claimed that Barnette “has absolutely nothing to do with what we are doing.”

Key WLM activists include:

White supremacist Ken Zrallack

White supremacist Ken Zrallack

  • Ken Zrallack (aka Kevin Harris and other pseudonyms).  Zrallack, who more than any other person may lay claim to starting the WLM network, is a long-time hard-core white supremacist from Connecticut who in the early 2000s with his brother founded the Connecticut White Wolves, a racist skinhead group.  In the mid-2000s he was involved with another hate group, White Revolution; later, he helped form yet another white supremacist group known as Battalion 14. In 2010, Zrallack and two other men were arrested in an alleged conspiracy to sell grenades and guns to a police informant posing as a white supremacist.  While one of the trio was convicted, Zrallack and the other defendant were acquitted.
  • Travis Golie.  Golie, who has lived most recently in Texas and Georgia, is a key ally and partner to Zrallack in WLM.  Golie is the current head of the Nationalist Movement, a small but longstanding white supremacist group, which is probably one reason why some of the early WLM fliers sported the address of the Nationalist Movement website.  Golie served time in prison in Iowa for second degree robbery, which caused Ku Klux Klan members to protest at his prison in 2009 in support of him.  He was released from prison in 2012.
  • Rebecca Barnette.  Barnette, who has perhaps received more publicity than anyone else associated with WLM, has not necessarily played one of the most important roles.  Barnette has claimed that WLM was started by Zrallack and herself “and a few others.”  She was an early on-line promoter of WLM, but her one attempt at organizing a WLM rally, in Buffalo, New York, in July 2016, was an embarrassing failure, with only 1-3 people showing up—but not Barnette herself.  After this debacle, she lost standing with other WLM activists. Barnette is from Tennessee, where she has been very active with the neo-Nazi National Socialist Movement. She has also had ties of varying strengths to other white supremacist groups, such as the Aryan Renaissance Society.
  • Ken Reed.  Reed, a Texan (though he spent several years in Rhode Island as a mattress salesman), is probably the most active figure in the Texas contingent of WLM.  He is one of the leaders of the Aryan Renaissance Society (ARS), a longstanding white supremacist group that dates back to the 1990s, when it was a racist skinhead group known as Aryan Reich Skins. It has also used the names White Power Liberation Front and Aryan Liberation Front. Originally based in New Jersey, ARS’s center of activity later moved to Texas, where it became something of a prison clique.  More recently, it has given itself a neo-Nazi makeover.  What has remained constant throughout is its white supremacy.
  • Doug Chism  Chism is the leader or “president” of ARS,  of which he is a long time member, dating back to its Aryan Reich Skin days.  He spent much of his membership behind bars in Texas, serving time on various convictions until 2009.  He lives in the greater Houston, Texas, area. Chism, born in 1969, is one of the oldest of the WLM activists.
  • Horace Scott Lacy.  Lacy is another ARS member from the Houston area; like Chism, he is one of the oldest WLM activists, born in 1967. Before Lacy was involved with ARS, he was a member and “special assignments major” in the large and violent Texas-based white supremacist prison gang known as the Aryan Circle. He became an Aryan Circle member in the 1990s and was still a member as late as 2009. Lacy is a felon with an extensive criminal history dating back to 1985, including convictions for possession of a controlled substance, aggravated robbery, and multiple theft charges.  He was arrested in April 2016 on aggravated robbery charges.
  • Bill Hagan (aka William Quigg).  Hagan, who publicly goes by the pseudonym William Quigg, emerged as part of California’s white supremacist scene in 2015 as the “West Coast Grand Dragon” of the Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. In February 2016, Hagan and other white supremacists organized a “White Lives Do Matter” rally in Anaheim, California, an event that received considerable media attention after insufficient police crowd control allowed left-wing counterdemonstrators to attack the white supremacists, turning the event into a bloody brawl that resulted in numerous serious injuries and multiple arrests to and of people from both sides.  Hagan also got media attention for claiming to “endorse” Hillary Clinton for president, then later claiming that he had somehow raised $20,000 in donations for Clinton from members of his tiny group. Hagan also has close ties to the neo-Nazi National Socialist Movement and attends many of their events.
  • Melissa Dennis.  Dennis, another Californian living in Bakersfield, is a member of the Noble Breed Kindred, a small white supremacist group. Dennis has been one of the most active West Coast promoters of WLM, both on-line and in the physical world, where she has passed out fliers and released red balloons.  She also sells WLM t-shirts and other white supremacist paraphernalia. Like Zrallack, she has also promoted “Free Matt Hale” events.

whitelives-matter-4-from-vk

Selected White Lives Matters Incidents/Events

  • September 2016: WLM flier drops by Zrallack in Connecticut. WLM members in Texas claimed to have “hand delivered food aid to Whites effected [sic] by the flooding in Baton Rouge, LA.”
  • August 2016: WLM flier drops by Zrallack in Connecticut. WLM protest in front of NAACP office in Houston, Texas.
  • July 2016: WLM flier drops by Zrallack in Connecticut. Small WLM protest in Dallas, Texas, in front of Bank of America Tower.  Failed WLM protest in Buffalo, New York.
  • June 2016: WLM flier drops by Zrallack in Connecticut. WLM flier drops in East Greenwich, Rhode Island, apparently by Ken Reed.
  • May 2016: WLM flier drops by Zrallack in Connecticut.
  • March 2016: WLM /“Free Matt Hale” flier drops by Zrallack in Connecticut. Matt Hale is a white supremacist serving a 40-year federal prison sentence for soliciting the murder of a federal judge. Many WLM activists also are vocal Matt Hale supporters.
  • February 2016: WLM/“Free Matt Hale” flier drops by Zrallack in Connecticut. Small WLM protest in Anaheim, California.
  • January 2016: WLM supporters put up handbills, apparently in Bakersville, California.
  • December 2015: WLM flier drops in various locations.
  • October 2015: WLM red balloon releases (“for Caucasian victims”) in different locations.
  • September 2015: WLM red balloon releases in different locations, plus distribution of fliers and stickers in California and Connecticut.
  • August 2015: WLM red balloon releases in different locations. Flier drops in Connecticut.
  • May 2015: Flier drop in Westport, Connecticut.
  • April 2015: Flier drop in Milford, Connecticut.

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April 26, 2016

White Supremacists Feud Over the Racist Gender Gap

There is fighting and acrimony between supporters of the two most visible websites in the white supremacist movement—Stormfront and The Daily Stormer—over the role of white women. Andrew Anglin, the neo-Nazi who runs The Daily Stormer, has infuriated many white supremacist women by posting articles on his site that attack white women. When a fan of Anglin’s recently asked on Stormfront why that website seemed to be deleting posts referencing Daily Stormer articles, his question elicited a flood of responses and highlighted the love/hate relationship that some male white supremacists have with their female counterparts.Anglin column on feminsim and third worldization

While most of the women who post on Stormfront advocate for traditional roles for women, which is the dominant white supremacist position, they are nevertheless angry that Anglin actively attacks and belittles white women—whereas many other male white supremacists put white women on a pedestal as future saviors of the white race.

Anglin angers such women because he  not only attacks what he sees as “deviant” white women, but also posts articles depicting them in provocative sexual poses and having relations with non-white men.  In an April 2015 article, Anglin posted a video that showed white women on spring break making out with non-white men and wrote that the video proved “that your worst enemy is not Jews, White Man, but your own females.”  He added that women “should be thankful they don’t literally get locked in cages.” In addition, Anglin often refers to women as bitches and sluts and blames them for a variety of issues affecting white society.  From his many posts on the subject, it is clear that Anglin is every bit as misogynistic as he is racist and anti-Semitic, expressing a deep contempt for women, even the movement’s precious white women, at every turn.

The response to Anglin from women on Stormfront has been very vocal. In one thread, a woman using the screen name “Mirror Eyes” wrote that “all those anti-women types are the same. They share the white nationalist views in the fact that they claim to be traditionalists (yet have nothing but derogatory things to say about females…).” Stormfronter “Pinkysmom” added, “If people want to post Anglin’s emotional/butthurt/impotent rage against white women, fine. But I will continue to post my views of his posts and I will make SF policy visible to all who care to read it.” In fact, Stormfront has rules that bar people from posting derogatory comments about women.

Some male Stormfront members have come out in support of Anglin’s misogyny, even wholeheartedly praising him.  Male Stormfronter “Piltene” wrote, “I love Andrew Anglin. His opinions are pretty much right on the women… Feminism is a a cancer on the White race.”

Others, such as “Laidbackguy,” expressed support of women. He commented, “I don’t judge a person on gender. You are either pro white or anti- white to me.” Another male Stormfronter, “TSFH14,” wrote that “as long as [Anglin] continues to write venomous attacks against our sisters, he is my enemy.” Many people were also furious that Anglin himself has self-admittedly had sex with non-white women in the past and accused him of being a traitor and a hypocrite.

Anglin has gone beyond merely speaking out against women.  Saying that the purpose of The Daily Stormer is to educate men about the white nationalist movement, Anglin has actually banned women from producing content for his site. He also posted a manifesto of sorts presenting his views about limiting women’s involvement and input into the movement. According to Anglin, his reason for doing so is that women are naturally amoral and emotional and are incapable of feeling empathy because they can switch it on and off, depending on their needs. Anglin argues that women should not be allowed to vote and should be barred from male occupations and that women’s role should only be to support men. He also alleges that allowing equality between the sexes leads to the feminization of men.

It is apparent that Anglin’s views are influenced by the “manopshere,” a loose association of misogynistic men’s rights groups that rail against women and feminism. Not surprisingly, Anglin adds an anti-Semitic twist, blaming Jews for promoting feminism, declaring that it is “a mechanism of Judaism.”

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April 25, 2016

White Supremacist Events Coincide With Hitler’s Birth Week

Marking the anniversary week of Adolf Hitler’s April 20th birthday, several neo-Nazi and Klan groups held collaborative events over the weekend of April 23. Four such events were held within approximately 150 miles of one another in north Alabama and central Georgia.  adl-blog

  • The United Klans of America (UKA) hosted a private event in Alabama which included a cross burning and several Klan weddings.  The event was open to all members of the Black and Silver alliance which consists of the UKA, the Sadistic Souls (an Illinois-based faction of the neo-Nazi Aryan Nations), James Logsdon’s small faction of the Creativity Movement, and Missouri and Tennessee members of the Right-Wing Resistance (a neo-Nazi group that originated in New Zealand.)
  • The neo-Nazi National Socialist Movement (NSM) hosted a rally at the Law Enforcement Center in Rome, Georgia. Approximately 100 people from various white supremacist groups attended the event, including the North Carolina-based Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan and the Texas Rebel Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.  Other attendees included Arthur Jones (a long-time Illinois neo-Nazis and Holocaust denier), Ted Dunn (leader of the SS Action group), and Eric Meadows, who has been linked to the neo-Confederate League of the South. The hateful rhetoric of rally speakers, who intermittently shouted “white power” and “Sieg Heil,” was largely drowned out by counter protesters. Two counter protesters were arrested for disorderly conduct.
  • Approximately two dozen people participated in a white power event at Georgia’s Stone Mountain Park. The poorly attended event, organized by white supremacist John Michael Estes and Klansman Greg Calhoun, was intended to protest leg­is­la­tion that would allow changes to exist­ing Con­fed­er­ate dis­plays and mon­u­ments, as well as a plan by the Stone Moun­tain Memo­r­ial Asso­ci­a­tion to install a mon­u­ment in Martin Luther King’s honor.  The small group held confederate flags and a banner that read “Diversity = White Genocide.” Several counter-protesters threw rocks and fireworks at police, and set a barricade on fire. At least eight counter-protesters were adewayne-stewartrrested and charged with violating Georgia’s mask law, and one was arrested for allegedly throwing smoke bombs at police.
  • On the evening of April 23, ralliers from both the Rome and Stone Mountain events attended a private after-party near Temple, Georgia. The event included white power music and the burning of both a cross and a swastika.

These collaborative events demonstrate the willingness of some Klan groups to practice a Nazified version of Klan ideology and to form symbiotic relationships with neo-Nazi groups.  With both the neo-Nazi movement and Klan movement in decline joint events can help mask the small numbers that individual white supremacist groups are able to generate.

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