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June 4, 2015 13

League of the South and Neo-Nazis Join Forces in Kentucky

Mem­bers of the neo-Confederate League of the South (LOS) joined together with neo-Nazis and other white suprema­cists on May 30 for a “Feds Out of Ken­tucky” rally in Alexan­dria, Ken­tucky, a few miles south­east of Cincinnati.

League of the South, Alexandria, KY

“Feds Out of Ken­tucky” rally in Alexan­dria, KY

The rally was orga­nized by Cole­man Lacy, a young mem­ber of the LOS from the local area who serves as the group’s “state chairman.”

In addi­tion, Geof­frey Rash, the Ken­tucky leader of the neo-Nazi National Social­ist Move­ment (NSM) and also a local res­i­dent, brought mem­bers to the event. After­wards, Rash stated that it was good for the LOS and the NSM to work together “to rid this coun­try, start­ing with our own states, of the Zion­ist Jewry that decays our peo­ple, our states and our nation.”

Though the LOS pro­moted the event, only about 14 peo­ple took part in the rally, wav­ing flags and anti-government signs.

How­ever, the sig­nif­i­cance of the event was not in its size.

Rather, the Alexan­dria rally marked the com­ple­tion of the LOS’s grad­ual trans­for­ma­tion from a neo-Confederate group that typ­i­cally denied hav­ing racist ties into an unabashed white suprema­cist group.

The LOS has had ties to other hate groups in the past but fre­quently denied such ties or dis­tanced itself from hate groups when ties were actu­ally pub­li­cized. In 2005, fol­low­ing the dev­as­ta­tion of Hur­ri­cane Kat­rina on the Gulf Coast, mem­bers of both the NSM and White Rev­o­lu­tion announced the LOS’s coop­er­a­tion in pro­vid­ing assis­tance to “white only” vic­tims of the hur­ri­cane. The LOS later said that it did not take part in or endorse such measures—though it did post “whites only” offers of assis­tance on its own website.

As recently as 2013, the LOS expelled a mem­ber, Matthew Heim­bach (also head of the Tra­di­tion­al­ist Youth Net­work, a small white suprema­cist group), for attend­ing a neo-Nazi event in Ken­tucky. How­ever, in another sign of the trans­for­ma­tion of the LOS into an explic­itly white suprema­cist group, Heim­bach was back inside the folds of the LOS within a year. Heim­bach attended the Alexan­dria rally.

Behind the grow­ing rad­i­cal­iza­tion of the LOS is none other than its founder and long­time leader, Michael Hill. Once a col­lege his­tory pro­fes­sor, by 2011, Hill was urg­ing his fol­low­ers to arm them­selves and “join the resis­tance.” The LOS began offer­ing mem­bers weapons train­ing around this time.

Protests by African-American com­mu­ni­ties in 2015 in the wake of highly-publicized police shoot­ings moved Hill even fur­ther into bla­tant white supremacy. In May 2015, Michael Hill declared his deter­mi­na­tion to par­tic­i­pate in a race war if “negroes,” egged on by the “largely Jewish-Progressive owned media,” engaged in “black rage.” Hill warned that “if negroes think a ‘race war’ in mod­ern Amer­ica would be to their advan­tage, they had bet­ter pre­pare them­selves for a very rude awak­en­ing.” On June 1, Hill openly declared that “our South­ern fore­bears” who opposed civil rights for African-Americans “were right.”

With a leader spout­ing tirades about race war and fol­low­ers openly cavort­ing with neo-Nazis and other white suprema­cists, there can be no fur­ther doubt that the League of the South, despite its past denials, is any­thing other than an explic­itly white suprema­cist organization.

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March 30, 2015 326

White Supremacists Protest Against Purported “White Genocide”

White suprema­cists in loca­tions across the United States recently took part in demon­stra­tions, leaflet­ings, and indi­vid­ual acts of protest to pro­mote an increas­ingly pop­u­lar con­cept within the white supremacy move­ment: the notion of “white genocide.”

Doggett at Starbucks

Doggett at Starbucks

The Anti-Defamation League tracked inci­dents in at least 11 states, includ­ing Alabama, Arkansas, Ari­zona, Cal­i­for­nia, Ken­tucky, New Jer­sey, North Car­olina, North Dakota, Ten­nessee, Texas, and Vir­ginia. Activ­i­ties also occurred in other coun­tries, includ­ing Aus­tralia, Canada, France, Great Britain, Hun­gary, and New Zealand.

All actions took place on March 21, 2015, a date white suprema­cists have for sev­eral years declared to be “White Pride World Wide Day.” Described as part of the “March against White Geno­cide,” the actions were orga­nized and pro­moted by Fight Wide Geno­cide, a self-described “col­lec­tive of…activism” led by white suprema­cist Laura Fitzger­ald, who is based in the Colum­bia, South Car­olina, area.

The term “white geno­cide” is a rel­a­tively recent phrase coined by white suprema­cists to describe one of their long-held con­vic­tions: that the white race is “dying” due to non-white immi­gra­tion and “forced assim­i­la­tion.” White suprema­cists com­monly claim that Jews are behind this “geno­ci­dal” action.

Fitzger­ald, the cam­paign orga­nizer, is a dis­ci­ple of Robert Whitaker, an elderly guru in the white suprema­cist move­ment. His fol­low­ers have coined what they term the “Stop White Geno­cide Mantra.” Fitzger­ald encour­aged white suprema­cists to par­tic­i­pate through demon­stra­tions, post­ing “#WhiteGeno­cide” stick­ers in pub­lic loca­tions, hold­ing up ban­ners at high-traffic loca­tions, or hand­ing out literature.

A few white suprema­cists even tried to exploit Star­bucks’ recent “Race Together” diver­sity cam­paign. Ron Doggett, a long­time white suprema­cist based in Rich­mond, Vir­ginia, and sev­eral oth­ers demon­strated out­side a local Star­bucks, hold­ing up a “Diver­sity = White Geno­cide” ban­ner and other white suprema­cist signs and plac­ards. Doggett is a for­mer sup­porter of David Duke, as well as Fra­zier Glenn Miller, the sus­pect in the 2014 fatal shoot­ings of three peo­ple at Jew­ish insti­tu­tions in Over­land Park, Kansas.

Another white suprema­cist posted on-line a photo of a cup of Star­bucks cof­fee with “‘Race Together’ is a code word for WHITE GENOCIDE” writ­ten on the sleeve.

Most demon­stra­tions and actions were small in scope. The largest occurred in Flo­rence, Ken­tucky, where 10–15 white suprema­cists led by neo-Nazi Robert Rans­dell car­ried a “‘Diver­sity’ = White Geno­cide” ban­ner and waved white suprema­cist flags and placards.

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February 13, 2014 1

Two Groups Attempt to Resurrect Neo-Nazi National Alliance

KevinStrom white shirt

Kevin Strom

For­mer mem­bers of the National Alliance (NA) are try­ing to res­ur­rect the orga­ni­za­tion by claim­ing they are its right­ful heirs.  The demise of the NA, once the largest neo-Nazi group in the U.S., has spurred two dif­fer­ent fac­tions to revive the mem­ory and “brand” of Alliance founder William Pierce.  Both groups hope they can con­vince other white suprema­cists to join them in form­ing a revamped ver­sion of the NA.

One-time NA mem­ber Jim Ring emerged as the leader of one fac­tion, the National Alliance Reform & Restora­tion Group (NARRG), which he founded in Feb­ru­ary 2014.  Ring left the NA in Octo­ber 2012, after run­ning its Sacra­mento, Cal­i­for­nia unit for 22 years. He announced this month that NARRG is pur­su­ing a civil law­suit against NA board mem­bers and Erich Gliebe, who has headed the NA since Pierce’s death.  A state­ment on the NARRG web­site claims that the group is suing Gliebe and the oth­ers for finan­cial dam­age done to the orga­ni­za­tion as well as “a myr­iad of instances of malfea­sance, mis­fea­sance, ille­gal­i­ties and irreg­u­lar­i­ties.”  Ring wants the NARRG to focus on cre­at­ing Pierce’s vision of a “white liv­ing space,” an area in the U.S that would be purged of all nonwhites.

Also try­ing to revive the NA is Kevin Strom, a for­mer leader of the group. Gliebe kicked Strom out of the NA in 2005.  Strom then formed the National Van­guard, which lasted until author­i­ties con­victed him on child pornog­ra­phy charges in 2007. Strom and Will Williams, who once headed the NA’s North Car­olina unit, claim to be build­ing a new NA head­quar­ters in the Appalachian Moun­tains. Strom has also re-launched Amer­i­can Dis­si­dent Voices (ADV), a short­wave radio show he and Pierce used to broad­cast under the aus­pices of the NA, start­ing in the early 1990s. Strom’s most recent Inter­net radio ADV broad­cast on Feb­ru­ary 8 was largely an updated ren­di­tion of Pierce’s anti-Semitic work, “Who Rules Amer­ica?” which alleges that Jews con­trol the media, gov­ern­ment and finan­cial indus­try in the U.S.

Both NARRG and Strom seem to be hop­ing for a nos­tal­gic revival of an orga­ni­za­tion they belonged to in its prime. These groups no doubt would like to erase the last decade that led to the NA’s down­fall. Since the death of Pierce in 2002, the orga­nized neo-Nazi move­ment in the United States has been on the decline and shows no signs of rejuvenation.

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