Palestine » ADL Blogs
Posts Tagged ‘Palestine’
October 28, 2014 3

Al Qaeda’s New English Magazine Harnesses Anti-Semitism

On Octo­ber 19, Al Qaeda Cen­tral (AQC) released its much vaunted English-language mag­a­zine, Resur­gence, which har­nesses anti-Semitic and anti-Israel sen­ti­ment to urge harm against the U.S. and the West.Al Qaeda Resurgence Magazine

Using for­mats sim­i­lar to those of Al Qaeda in the Ara­bian Penin­sula (AQAP)’s Inspire mag­a­zine, Resur­gence also advo­cates for Al Qaeda as the orga­ni­za­tion faces com­pe­ti­tion from the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS).

The magazine’s cover story, “Besiege Them: Prac­ti­cal Steps Towards the Lib­er­a­tion of Pales­tine” draws upon the anti-Semitic canard that Jews con­trol inter­na­tional finance. The arti­cle argues that the best means to defeat Israel is to divest from “inter­na­tional trade and finance” and revert to the barter sys­tem. The arti­cle uses the same strat­egy found in AQAP’s most recent English-language pub­li­ca­tion, Pales­tine: Betrayal of the Guilty Con­science, draw­ing read­ers’ atten­tion by claim­ing to be about Israel, but then argu­ing that the best way to defeat Israel is to hurt the U.S. and the West (in this case eco­nom­i­cally), fur­ther­ing Al Qaeda’s pri­mary goals.The use of anti-Semitic themes is com­mon in Al Qaeda and AQAP pub­li­ca­tions and messaging.

Unlike AQAP’s Eng­lish lan­guage mag­a­zines, Resur­gence does not pro­vide sug­ges­tions for indi­vid­ual attacks in west­ern coun­tries. It does, how­ever, pro­vide a map of U.S. naval and air force bases in the Mid­dle East and sug­gest attacks against them and against West­ern ships trav­el­ing through strate­gi­cally vul­ner­a­ble water channels.

This attack sug­ges­tion appears to sup­port a larger goal of the mag­a­zine: Defend­ing Al Qaeda and its ide­ol­ogy in the face of increas­ing oppo­si­tion from ISIS.  This is evi­dent through­out the mag­a­zine; even the intro­duc­tion states, “Resur­gence is a hum­ble effort to pro­mote a cor­rect under­stand­ing of Jihad and explain its rel­e­vance to con­tem­po­rary issues fac­ing Mus­lims” (empha­sis added).

Resur­gence’s goal of defend­ing AQC is also clear in its pro­fil­ing of Al Qaeda affil­i­ates through­out the world. In one arti­cle on Syria, the mag­a­zine calls on Mus­lims to “par­tic­i­pate in the jihad phys­i­cally” or sup­port it finan­cially and only ref­er­enc­ing ISIS in a call to stop infight­ing between groups.

A fea­tured quote by high-ranking Al Qaeda mem­ber Abu Dujana al Pasha states, “We call for a Caliphate based on jus­tice, mutual con­sul­ta­tion, har­mony and unity; not a ‘Caliphate’ based on oppres­sion, excom­mu­ni­ca­tion of Mus­lims, killing the uphold­ers of Tauheed (monothe­ism), and sow­ing dis­cord in the ranks of the Mujahideen.”

Resur­gence mag­a­zine was released the same day that Tahrek e-Taliban Pak­istan (TTP, or the Pak­istani Tal­iban) released its own English-language mag­a­zine. Titled Reviv­ing the Caliphate, the mag­a­zine high­lights fault­lines between pro and anti-ISIS fac­tions of the TTP. Inter­est­ingly, it incor­po­rates images taken directly from ISIS pro­pa­ganda pub­li­ca­tions and calls for revival of a Caliphate, but does not cite ISIS by name. Reviv­ing the Caliphate also attempts to appeal to West­ern audi­ences by high­light­ing for­eign fight­ers involved in the TTP.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

October 23, 2014 0

Tufts University Hosting National Students For Justice In Palestine Conference

Stu­dents for Jus­tice in Pales­tine (SJP), the nation’s largest pro-Palestinian stu­dent orga­ni­za­tion with more than 80 active chap­ters on col­lege and uni­ver­sity cam­puses, will hold its 4th National Stu­dents for Jus­tice in Pales­tine Con­fer­ence at Tufts Uni­ver­sity. The con­fer­ence, which runs from Octo­ber 24–26, is titled “Beyond Sol­i­dar­ity: Resist­ing Racism and Colo­nial­ism from the U.S. to Pales­tine,” a ref­er­ence to SJP activists’ efforts to con­nect vary­ing strug­gles and move­ments to the Pales­tin­ian cause.sjp-national-conference-tufts-university

As with pre­vi­ous SJP national con­fer­ences this year’s con­fer­ence is only open to stu­dents who are active with a cam­pus group. The con­fer­ence is set to fea­ture a wide array of anti-Israel activists, includ­ing uni­ver­sity pro­fes­sors, stu­dents, clergy mem­bers, and mem­bers of the global Boy­cott, Divest­ment and Sanc­tions (BDS) movement.

Among the invited speak­ers are J. Kēhaulani Kauanui, an Asso­ciate Pro­fes­sor of Amer­i­can Stud­ies & Anthro­pol­ogy at Wes­leyan Uni­ver­sity and an advi­sor to the U.S. Cam­paign for the Aca­d­e­mic and Cul­tural Boy­cott of Israel (USACBI); Muham­mad Desai, the coor­di­na­tor of BDS South Africa who was seen singing the words “shoot the Jew” at a 2013 anti-Israel protest; Sara Ker­sh­ner, a co-founder of the Inter­na­tional Jew­ish Anti-Zionist Net­work; and sev­eral stu­dent activists from var­i­ous SJP chapters.

The con­fer­ence pan­els, accord­ing to the SJP con­fer­ence web­site, will con­sist of dis­cus­sions that con­flate social jus­tice with the Israeli-Palestinian con­flict. Panel titles include: “From Fer­gu­son to Pales­tine: Resist­ing State Vio­lence and Racism,” and “Migrant Jus­tice and the Undoc­u­mented Pales­tin­ian Expe­ri­ence in the U.S.” SJP chap­ters often try to link domes­tic issues and events, such as the Fer­gu­son, Mis­souri shoot­ing and its after­math to the con­flict in Gaza, couch­ing hos­til­ity toward Israel in social jus­tice terms to appeal to a broader audi­ence. In addi­tion, there will also be a ses­sion on “Islamic Move­ments of Pales­tine,” that will exam­ine “how Islam informed resis­tance move­ments and what dif­fer­ent ways Islamic move­ments oper­ated in Palestine.”

In pre­vi­ous years SJP held its national con­fer­ence at Colum­bia Uni­ver­sity in 2011, the Uni­ver­sity of Michi­gan in 2012, and at Stan­ford Uni­ver­sity in 2013. The con­fer­ences typ­i­cally include inflam­ma­tory lan­guage and rhetoric to describe Israel, and, at times, speak­ers have glo­ri­fied the use of vio­lence by Pales­tin­ian groups.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

October 8, 2014 0

Sweden’s Recognition of ‘Palestine’ Premature and Ill-Advised

   By Abra­ham H. Fox­man
   National Direc­tor of the Anti-Defamation League

   This arti­cle orig­i­nally appeared in The Huff­in­g­ton Post

Many observers were sur­prised by the sud­den announce­ment by the newly elected prime min­is­ter of Swe­den that his coun­try would become the first in the Euro­pean Union to for­mally rec­og­nize the “State of Palestine.”

The announce­ment by Prime Min­is­ter Ste­fan Lofven, which stip­u­lated that his new gov­ern­ment would even­tu­ally rec­og­nize a Pales­tin­ian state within the 1967 bor­ders, was inap­pro­pri­ate on a num­ber of lev­els. First, it is con­trary to long­stand­ing E.U. for­eign pol­icy. Sec­ond, it appears to reward the intran­si­gence of Pales­tin­ian Pres­i­dent Mah­moud Abbas, which was on full dis­play in his recent speech at the United Nations. Mr. Abbas’ over­heated rhetoric only con­tributes to dis­cour­ag­ing the pos­si­bil­ity of resum­ing nego­ti­a­tions between Israel and the Palestinians.

But Sweden’s deci­sion was much less sur­pris­ing if one con­sid­ers the state of dete­ri­o­rat­ing rela­tions between Swe­den and Israel, which in recent years have trig­gered tremors along a grow­ing fault line in Swedish soci­ety between more mod­er­ate forces and the rad­i­cal left.

It should be said upfront here that the bilat­eral rela­tion­ship between Israel and Swe­den remains vitally impor­tant, and that even with this poten­tial change in pol­icy there are still oppor­tu­ni­ties to move for­ward diplomatically.

Com­pli­cated fac­tors are at play in Swedish pol­i­tics and soci­ety, and these are clearly influ­enc­ing its for­eign pol­icy. Zvi Mazel, who served as Israeli ambas­sador to Stock­holm between 2002 and 2004, out­lined some of those fac­tors in recent inter­views in the Israeli press.

Lofven, he noted, only won the elec­tion with 43 per­cent of the vote, and needs to form a minor­ity gov­ern­ment that has the sup­port of the for­merly com­mu­nist left-wing party, which has stri­dent anti-Israel pro­cliv­i­ties and whose sup­port­ers are pri­mar­ily Arab and Mus­lim Swedish cit­i­zens. Mus­lims now com­prise about 8 per­cent of Sweden’s pop­u­la­tion after the coun­try absorbed more than 80,000 immi­grants from Syria and Iraq this year alone.

As a result, says Mazel, Lofven is seek­ing sup­port and pub­lic sym­pa­thy by play­ing “the Israel card.”

Two of Lofven’s cab­i­net appoint­ments are trou­bling as well. They are indi­vid­u­als well known for their enthu­si­as­tic sup­port for the Pales­tin­ian cause and who were deported from Israel because of their activities.

Accord­ing to a report in the Israeli daily Ma’ariv, the new city plan­ning and envi­ron­ment min­is­ter, Mehmet Kaplan, a native of Turkey and a for­mer spokesman for the Mus­lim Coun­cil of Swe­den, was involved in the Mavi Mar­mara inci­dent in which pas­sen­gers on the Gaza-bound ship vio­lently attacked Israeli naval per­son­nel in 2010. And the new edu­ca­tion min­is­ter, Gus­tav Fridolin, was arrested and deported from Israel in 2003 for encour­ag­ing demon­stra­tions against the secu­rity fence between the West Bank and Israel.

More­over, highly pub­li­cized spats between Israel and Swe­den in recent years have widened the rift between these two coun­tries that oth­er­wise share many of the same demo­c­ra­tic val­ues and a strong bilat­eral relationship.

Most mem­o­rably, in August 2009 the Swedish news­pa­per Afton­bladet pub­lished a false and mali­cious report that Israeli sol­diers were har­vest­ing organs from Pales­tini­ans. The report mush­roomed into a full-blown global con­spir­acy the­ory and led to a diplo­matic row when Swe­den rejected Israel’s request to con­demn the false report, cit­ing “press freedom.”

Ear­lier that year a mob descended on a sta­dium where an Israeli team was play­ing against Swe­den, with pro­tes­tors car­ry­ing signs con­demn­ing Israel and threat­en­ing to attack Israeli athletes.

There have also been trou­bling anti-Semitic attacks reported in the coun­try this year, tak­ing place before and after Israel’s oper­a­tion in Gaza. In March, a high school in Stock­holm which holds classes for Jew­ish stu­dents was spray painted with anti-Semitic graf­fiti, includ­ing a swastika, the phrases “Jew­ish swine” and dis­gust­ing Jews.” In July, the city of Malmo’s main syn­a­gogue was attacked when van­dals hurled bot­tles at the build­ing, break­ing three win­dows. And in August, a rabbi in Malmo was attacked by a group of men who threw a glass bot­tle at his car while shout­ing anti-Semitic epithets.

At the same time, the coun­try has high lev­els of edu­ca­tion and a very low accep­tance for tra­di­tional anti-Semitic beliefs.

The recent ADL Global 100 Sur­vey found that only 4 per­cent of the adult pop­u­la­tion in Swe­den is infected with anti-Semitic atti­tudes, the low­est find­ing for Europe. This amounts to just 300,000 peo­ple out of a total pop­u­la­tion of 7.4 mil­lion peo­ple. Com­pared with other coun­tries in Europe (France was 37 per­cent, Nor­way and Fin­land, 15 per­cent) this was a remark­ably low score.

And here is where the issues of Israeli poli­cies and the anti-Jewish rhetoric and vio­lence in Swe­den can get enmeshed. Politi­cians and jour­nal­ists who espouse vir­u­lently anti-Israel mes­sages, con­tribute to an atmos­phere which pro­vides a patina of accept­abil­ity and cover for anti-Jewish hate to emerge. While 96 per­cent of Swedish adults do not har­bor strong anti-Semitic atti­tudes, the small per­cent­age who do are likely among the ones act­ing on those beliefs and doing it under the guise of express­ing oppo­si­tion to Israel’s poli­cies toward the Palestinians.

It is up to Sweden’s polit­i­cal, reli­gious and civic lead­ers to make clear to the peo­ple of Swe­den that anti-Semitic rhetoric and vio­lence against the Jew­ish pop­u­la­tion are never accept­able expres­sions of crit­i­cism of Israel’s poli­cies. Prime Min­is­ter Lovfen should be the one to set an exam­ple in this regard, not allow­ing pol­i­tics to trump the government’s respon­si­bil­ity to ensure the well-being and secu­rity of Sweden’s small but vibrant Jew­ish community.

Sweden’s pre­ma­ture recog­ni­tion of the State of Pales­tine will have reper­cus­sions far beyond Scan­di­navia. Swe­den is con­sid­ered a flag-bearer of human rights, and many coun­tries across Europe respond to its cues. The risk is that other coun­tries in the E.U. may soon want to fol­low suit.

The U.S., the inter­na­tional com­mu­nity, and the global Jew­ish com­mu­nity need to con­vince Swe­den that this is the wrong posi­tion at the wrong time.

If Swe­den is truly con­cerned about improv­ing the sit­u­a­tion for the Pales­tin­ian peo­ple, they should be work­ing hard to sup­port inter­na­tional efforts to pre­vent Hamas from replen­ish­ing its sup­ply of mis­siles and rock­ets and to pro­mote the restora­tion of hous­ing and infra­struc­ture for the peo­ple of Gaza.

The time for rec­og­niz­ing a Pales­tin­ian state will come when the Pales­tin­ian lead­er­ship shows it is fully com­mit­ted to liv­ing in peace and secu­rity in a state side by side with Israel and the par­ties reach an agree­ment through direct bilat­eral nego­ti­a­tions resolv­ing all the issues between them.

Tags: , , , , , ,