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August 5, 2015 0

New AQAP Video Calls for Attacks Against the U.S.

AQAP propaganda video calls for attacks against U.S.

AQAP pro­pa­ganda video calls for attacks against U.S.

Al Qaeda in the Ara­bian Penin­sula (AQAP) has released a new video prais­ing recent ter­ror attacks in West­ern coun­tries and call­ing for addi­tional attacks against the U.S. The video, which demon­strates Al Qaeda’s con­tin­ued com­mit­ment to attacks against the West, comes as pol­i­cy­mak­ers con­tinue to debate whether the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) or Al Qaeda serves as a greater threat to domes­tic security.

In the video, AQAP offi­cial Abu al-Miqdad al Kindi, who is the speaker through­out the video, calls for attacks against Amer­ica, stat­ing, “Oh Mujahideen (fight­ers) in every cor­ner of the world, I urge you on America…direct your spears towards them.” He also urges view­ers to read Inspire mag­a­zine, AQAP’s English-language pro­pa­ganda mag­a­zine, for instruc­tions, stating:

“And to the war­riors of Lone Jihad, may Allah bless and guide your efforts….Set your goals with pre­ci­sion and focus your strikes on the enemy’s joints. And after seek­ing help from Allah, seek guid­ance and instruc­tion from Inspire Mag­a­zine. For indeed it presents prac­ti­cal and effi­cient guid­ance. It places impor­tant direc­tions in assur­ing the suc­cess of lone Jihad in achiev­ing planned goals.”

In the video, Al-Kindi specif­i­cally praises attacks in response to draw­ings depict­ing Muham­mad, includ­ing the attack against the Char­lie Hebdo mag­a­zine in Paris (whose per­pe­tra­tors had allegedly trained with AQAP) and the attack against a Gar­land, TX ‘Draw Moham­mad con­test,’ (whose per­pe­tra­tors had allegedly been inspired by ISIS).

He also describes the recent shoot­ing at mil­i­tary insti­tu­tions in Chat­tanooga, Ten­nessee, as “a blessed jihadi oper­a­tion,” which he says demon­strates that, “lone jihad has proven to be and will always prove to be a strate­gic weapon suc­cess­fully hit­ting and pen­e­trat­ing the enemy’s fort.”

Al-Kindi also argues that leg­is­la­tion aimed at pre­vent­ing Holo­caust denial and anti-Semitism in Euro­pean coun­tries legit­i­mates vio­lent attacks against West­ern tar­gets per­ceived as defam­ing Islam and Muham­mad; in so doing, it also appears to val­i­date Holo­caust revisionism:

Amer­ica, France, and other Kufr nations are the ones who assist and make leg­is­la­tions (sic) to pro­tect those who abuse Islam and the Prophets, the same nations which leg­is­late and pun­ish whomever ques­tions the Holo­caust but rather any­one who ques­tions the authen­tic­ity of the sta­tis­tics. It does not mat­ter if the crit­i­cism came from a researcher or a his­to­rian. These are the same nations led by Amer­ica, imple­ment­ing laws that will empower them to place the world under watch in order to iden­tify who is ‘anti-Semitic’ (anti-Semitism laws) which are not bounded by their free­dom of expres­sion. And as you put lim­its to free­dom of expres­sion and pun­ish whomever goes against them, it is upon us to pun­ish who­ever trans­gresses our bound­aries and sanctities.”

The video was released this morn­ing on the Twit­ter feed asso­ci­ated with Al Male­hem Media, the media wing of AQAP. The Twit­ter account has been active since April and has over 6,000 followers.

Only three of the 58 U.S. res­i­dents linked to ter­ror­ism in 2015 appear to have been inspired to act by or on behalf of Al Qaeda; the remain­ing 55 allegedly acted in sup­port of ISIS, although a num­ber of them had allegedly read or watched both Al Qaeda and ISIS propaganda.

This video was released less than a week after a let­ter attrib­uted to AQAP bomb-maker Ibrahim Has­san al-Asiri that also called for attacks on the U.S. was posted to Twitter.

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July 23, 2015 5

Help Take ISIS Videos Off WordPress

Ansar Khilafah promotes terrorist propaganda on WordPress

Screen­shot from the site

The Anti-Defamation League con­tacted Word­Press about a web­site it hosts that fea­tures hun­dreds of Islamic State in Syria and Iraq (ISIS) pro­pa­ganda videos, state­ments and publications.

This par­tic­u­lar web­site includes pro­pa­ganda released by ISIS and other ter­ror groups in Eng­lish, French, Turk­ish, Dutch, Ara­bic and other lan­guages. Among the hun­dreds of items on the site are behead­ing and exe­cu­tion videos, as well as videos and arti­cles encour­ag­ing West­ern­ers to travel to join ISIS or to com­mit attacks on its behalf in their home countries.

Help us urge Word­Press to remove this web­site from its plat­form. Copy this URL https://ansarkhilafah.wordpress.com and paste it into the Word­Press com­plaint form. Mark it as “abu­sive” and tell Word­Press that it’s NOT OK to sup­port ter­ror­ist content.

The pro­pa­ganda made avail­able by this web­site comes from var­i­ous ISIS media out­lets, includ­ing Al Hayat Media, Al Furqan Media, Al-I’tisam Media and Ajnad Media. The site also has a sec­tion for ISIS’ English-language mag­a­zine Dabiq.

Ansar Khilafah blog on WordPress features ISIS propaganda

Screen­shot from the site

Online repos­i­to­ries of ter­ror­ist pro­pa­ganda are not new. In Feb­ru­ary 2015, an ISIS sup­porter cre­ated a web­site called IS-Tube. Sim­i­lar to the Word­Press site, IS-Tube pro­vided access to an archive of search­able ISIS pro­pa­ganda videos. IS-Tube was hosted on a Google-owned IP bloc, and Google quickly removed the site after ADL noti­fied the com­pany of its pres­ence. Both IS-Tube and the Word­Press site appear to have orig­i­nated in the Netherlands.

In July 2014, ISIS attempted to move its online pres­ence away from Twit­ter – where its accounts were reg­u­larly shut down – to alter­nate social media plat­forms Frien­dica and Quit­ter. ADL pub­li­cized the move and Frien­dica and Quit­ter quickly removed all ISIS pres­ence from their platforms.

If you come across such con­tent on other plat­forms, the ADL’s Cyber-Safety Action Guide pro­vides resources on flag­ging con­tent directly with host companies.

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July 17, 2015 0

Military Sites And Personnel: A Common Target for Islamic Extremists

The Chattanooga recruiting center attacked by Abdulazeez on July 16, 2015

The recruit­ing cen­ter attacked by Abdu­lazeez on July 16, 2015

The motive behind Moham­mad Yousef Abdulazeez’s attack on two mil­i­tary sites in Chat­tanooga, Ten­nessee, that killed four Marines yes­ter­day remains unclear. His actions, how­ever, are con­sis­tent with other domes­tic attacks and plots car­ried out by U.S. res­i­dents moti­vated by Islamic extrem­ist ideologies.

Mil­i­tary sites and per­son­nel are a com­mon tar­get for Islamic extrem­ists in the U.S. and ter­ror­ist pro­pa­ganda has encour­aged vio­lence against mil­i­tary tar­gets. An Islamic State of Iraq and Syria(ISIS) pro­pa­ganda video released April 14, 2015, for exam­ple, fea­tured images of dead and wounded sol­diers with the cap­tions, “muti­lated sol­diers are com­ing back to your home­land close to des­per­a­tion. Eyes are being lost, bod­ies with­out legs, we want your blood….”

Two of the three deadly Islamic extrem­ist attacks in the U.S. since 2009, (the Ft. Hood shoot­ing and the shoot­ing at the Lit­tle Rock, Arkansas army recruit­ing cen­ter) were specif­i­cally directed at mil­i­tary targets.

  • Abdul­hakim Mujahid Muham­mad was 23 years old when he killed one sol­dier and injured another dur­ing a drive by shoot­ing at a mil­i­tary recruit­ing office in Lit­tle Rock, Arkansas. Muham­mad, a con­vert to Islam, admit­ted shoot­ing the uni­formed sol­diers “because of what they had done to Mus­lims in the past” and said that he “would have killed more sol­diers had they been in the park­ing lot.” He also report­edly admit­ted that he was angry about the killing of Mus­lims in Iraq and Afghanistan. Prior to the Lit­tle Rock shoot­ing, he had thrown a fire­bomb at a rabbi’s house  in Nashville, Ten­nessee, and fired shots at a rabbi’s home in Lit­tle Rock. Loca­tions and indi­vid­u­als that are, or are per­ceived as, Jew­ish or related to Israel are also reg­u­lar tar­gets for Islamic extrem­ist plots. Moham­mad had also attempted to carry out an addi­tional attack on a mil­i­tary recruit­ing cen­ter in Kentucky.
  • Nidal Malik Has­san, was 39 years old when he killed 13 peo­ple at the Fort Hood Army Base in Texas, where he had been work­ing as an army psy­chi­a­trist. Prior to the attack, Has­san had been in con­tact with Anwar Al-Awlaki, the U.S. born English-language pro­pa­gan­dist for Al Qaeda in the Ara­bian Penin­sula (AQAP), who was killed in a drone strike in 2011. In an inter­view with a Yemeni jour­nal­ist, al-Awlaki claimed that Hasan viewed him as a con­fi­dant and he said that he “blessed the act because it was against a mil­i­tary tar­get. And the sol­diers who were killed were not nor­mal sol­diers, but those who were trained and pre­pared to go to Afghanistan and Iraq.”

There have been numer­ous other plots against mil­i­tary insti­tu­tions and per­son­nel in the years since the Fort Hood and Lit­tle Rock attacks in 2009. The fol­low­ing is a sam­pling of those plots that tar­geted spe­cific mil­i­tary facil­i­ties in the U.S. since 2009:

  • April 10, 2015: John T. Booker, Jr., a 20-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen from Kansas was arrested and charged with attempt­ing to under­take a sui­cide attack at Ft. Riley mil­i­tary base.
  • March 26, 2015: Hasan Edmonds, a 22-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen from Illi­nois and Jonas Edmonds, a 29-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen from Illi­nois, were arrested and charged with attempt­ing to join ISIS. Court doc­u­ments indi­cate the two were also for­mu­lat­ing a plot against the National Guard armory in Juliet where Hasan, a mem­ber of the National Guard, had trained, using Hasan’s uni­form and his knowl­edge of the site.
  • Feb­ru­ary 2015: An Unnamed 16-year-old minor from South Car­olina was arrested for a plot to under­take a shoot­ing at a North Car­olina mil­i­tary insti­tu­tion and then travel to join ISIS. He was charged as a minor in pos­ses­sion of a pis­tol and sen­tenced in March 2015 to five years in juve­nile deten­tion, fol­lowed by counseling.
  • Feb­ru­ary 2, 2015: Abdi­rah­man Sheikh Mohamud, a 23-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen from Ohio, was arrested and charged with join­ing Jab­hat al Nusra. Court doc­u­ments indi­cate that Muhamud returned to the U.S. with the inten­tion of com­mit­ting an attack against a Texas mil­i­tary base.
  • Feb­ru­ary 7, 2014: Erwin Anto­nio Rios, a 19-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen, was arrested in 2013 and charged with pos­ses­sion of a stolen firearm. He is believed to have been plan­ning to mur­der U.S. mil­i­tary per­son­nel at Ft. Bragg.
  • Sep­tem­ber 29, 2011: Rezwan Matin Fer­daus, a 26-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen, was arrested for plan­ning to fly explosives-packed model air­planes into the Pen­ta­gon in order to “dis­able their (the Amer­i­can) mil­i­tary center.”
  • July 27, 2011:Naser Jason Abdo, a 21-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen, was charged in July 2011 with plan­ning to bomb a restau­rant fre­quented by Ft. Hood per­son­nel and then to tar­get the sur­vivors with firearms. Abdo yelled “Nidal Hasan Fort Hood 2009″ while leav­ing his first court appearance.
  • June 23, 2011: Yonathan Melaku, a 23-year-old nat­u­ral­ized U.S. cit­i­zen orig­i­nally from Ethiopia, was arrested after he fired shots at the National Museum of the Marine Corps, the Iwo Jima memo­r­ial and the Pentagon.
  • June 23, 2011: Abu Khalid Abdul-Latif, a 33-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen and Walli Majahidh, a 32-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen were arrested for a plot to attack a Mil­i­tary Entrance Pro­cess­ing Site in Seat­tle, Washington.
  • Decem­ber 8, 2010: Anto­nio Mar­tinez, a 21-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen and a recent con­vert to Islam, was charged with attempt­ing to det­o­nate what he believed was a car bomb at an army recruit­ing cen­ter in Catonsville, Maryland.
  • Novem­ber 5, 2009: As described above, Nidal Malik Hasan, a 39-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen and army psy­chi­a­trist, killed 12 sol­diers and one civil­ian in a shoot­ing at the Fort Hood army base.
  • July 27, 2009: Daniel Patrick Boyd, a 39-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen and con­vert to Islam, was arrested together with his sons, Dylan Boyd (22) and Zakariya Boyd (20), and four other North Car­olina res­i­dents — Ziyad Yaghi (21), Moham­mad Omar Aly Has­san (22), Anes Sub­a­sic (33), Hysen Sher­ifi (24) and Jude Kenan Muham­mad (20) — with con­spir­ing to mur­der U.S. mil­i­tary per­son­nel in con­nec­tion with Boyd’s alleged sur­veil­lance of a Marine Corps base in Quan­tico, Vir­ginia. Boyd had obtained maps of the mil­i­tary base to plan the attack and pos­sessed armor pierc­ing ammu­ni­tion to “attack the Amer­i­cans,” accord­ing to the Depart­ment of Justice.
  • June 1, 2009: As described above, Abdul­hakim Mujahid Muham­mad, a 23-year-old U.S. cit­i­zen and a con­vert to Islam, was arrested fol­low­ing his attack at the Lit­tle Rock, Arkansas mil­i­tary recruit­ing cen­ter that killed one soldier.
  • May 20, 2009: U.S. cit­i­zens James Cromi­tie (44), David Williams (28) and Onta Williams (32) and Hait­ian native Laguerre Payen (23) were arrested for a plot that involved plant­ing what they believed were bombs in cars out­side of the Riverdale Tem­ple and the nearby Riverdale Jew­ish Cen­ter. They also plot­ted to destroy mil­i­tary air­craft at the New York Air National Guard Base located at Stew­art Air­port in New­burgh, New York.

There have also been instances of indi­vid­u­als who dis­cussed attack­ing the mil­i­tary or mil­i­tary per­son­nel more broadly, but did not have spe­cific tar­gets. They include Asia Sid­diqui and Noelle Velentzas, who were arrested in 2015 and allegedly dis­cussed bomb­ing a mil­i­tary or gov­ern­ment tar­get;  Mufid Elfgeeh, who was arrested in 2014 and allegedly intended to shoot mil­i­tary per­son­nel; and Jose Pimentel, who was arrested in 2011 and plot­ted to attack mil­i­tary per­son­nel and other targets.

Oth­ers report­edly con­sid­ered attack­ing mil­i­tary insti­tu­tions but then chose other tar­gets instead. For exam­ple, Alexan­der Cic­colo was arrested in 2015 and allegedly dis­cussed tar­get­ing the mil­i­tary before decid­ing to attack a uni­ver­sity, and Amine El Khal­ifi, who was arrested in 2012 and allegedly dis­cussed tar­get­ing the mil­i­tary before decid­ing to attack the Cap­i­tal building.

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