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September 9, 2016

Who’s Who in White Lives Matter

WLM protest at NAACP office in Houston, Texas

WLM protest at NAACP office in Houston, Texas

In late August, around 20 so-called “White Lives Matter” (WLM) activists attracted national attention after staging an armed protest in front of the Houston, Texas, offices of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

A WLM spokesperson claimed that the extremists were there to protest against the purported failure of the NAACP to speak out against alleged “atrocities” committed by the Black Lives Matter movement.

When white supremacists toting assault rifles show up in front of NAACP offices, that’s news.  The incident understandably caused concern.  But what is White Lives Matter?  Is it a group?  A movement?  Just a slogan?

The best way to describe WLM might be as a network—a small network of hardcore white supremacists with connections to a variety of hate groups.  These extremists started organizing events and activities under the banner of “White Lives Matter,” regardless of what group or groups they actually belonged to.

The white supremacist movement in the United States has a history of this type of organizing; in 2012-2014, various white supremacists around the country engaged in similar activities as part of the so-called “South Africa Project” and related “White Genocide Project,” designed to raise awareness of purported (but actually fictional) “genocides” of whites in South Africa, the United States, and elsewhere.  WLM follows squarely in this tradition.

Most such campaigns fade away after a year or two, but because WLM is in effect an active white supremacist protest against Black Lives Matter, it theoretically has the potential to last as long as that movement does.  It is important to stress that the Black Lives Matter movement and the WLM network are in no way equivalent or comparable, either in size or the nature of their beliefs and goals.

White Lives Matter Activities

WLM fliers for distribution

WLM fliers for distribution

“White Lives Matter” began as a transparent white supremacist slogan designed to respond to the Black Lives Matter movement, a protest movement that emerged in late 2014.  No single person came up with the slogan; by early 2015, numerous white racists were already using “white lives matter” as an on-line rallying cry.

It did not take long before some white supremacists began to take the concept out into the physical world, with the distribution of WLM fliers in neighborhoods in Connecticut in April 2015.  Most WLM activities since then have taken place in Connecticut, Texas or California, with a few scattered incidents elsewhere.

White supremacist posting WLM handbill

White supremacist posting WLM handbill

WLM matters activities have typically taken the form of on-line promotion of white supremacy using the “White Lives Matter” slogan, organizing WLM protests and rallies, distributing WLM fliers, handbills or stickers, and releasing red balloons into the sky “for Caucasian victims.”  The latter takes place on a very small scale and is usually caught on video to use on the Internet.

White Lives Matter: The Cast of Characters

Dozens of white supremacists around the country have taken part in one or more WLM activities since 2015, but the network is not very large.

In fact, a small handful of individuals are responsible for conducting or organizing most of the on-line and real-world WLM activities.  The first to become active, in the spring of 2015, were Ken Zrallack from Connecticut and his friend, Travis Golie, who has recently lived in Texas and Georgia.

By late 2015, the Aryan Renaissance Society (ARS), a longstanding white supremacist group based primarily in Texas, had also begun promoting WLM—to the irritation of the others.  In October 2015, Golie groused about ARS, which he described as a “brand new self proclaimed group” and a “silly gang,” claiming they stole WLM materials and put their own logo on them.  The materials appear to have been transmitted through Rebecca Barnette.  Barnette herself is disliked by some other WLM activists.  California WLM activist Mellissa Dennis described Barnette in September 2016 as “a bottom feeder who wants attention.” A WLM facebook page apparently run by Zrallack claimed that Barnette “has absolutely nothing to do with what we are doing.”

Key WLM activists include:

White supremacist Ken Zrallack

White supremacist Ken Zrallack

  • Ken Zrallack (aka Kevin Harris and other pseudonyms).  Zrallack, who more than any other person may lay claim to starting the WLM network, is a long-time hard-core white supremacist from Connecticut who in the early 2000s with his brother founded the Connecticut White Wolves, a racist skinhead group.  In the mid-2000s he was involved with another hate group, White Revolution; later, he helped form yet another white supremacist group known as Battalion 14. In 2010, Zrallack and two other men were arrested in an alleged conspiracy to sell grenades and guns to a police informant posing as a white supremacist.  While one of the trio was convicted, Zrallack and the other defendant were acquitted.
  • Travis Golie.  Golie, who has lived most recently in Texas and Georgia, is a key ally and partner to Zrallack in WLM.  Golie is the current head of the Nationalist Movement, a small but longstanding white supremacist group, which is probably one reason why some of the early WLM fliers sported the address of the Nationalist Movement website.  Golie served time in prison in Iowa for second degree robbery, which caused Ku Klux Klan members to protest at his prison in 2009 in support of him.  He was released from prison in 2012.
  • Rebecca Barnette.  Barnette, who has perhaps received more publicity than anyone else associated with WLM, has not necessarily played one of the most important roles.  Barnette has claimed that WLM was started by Zrallack and herself “and a few others.”  She was an early on-line promoter of WLM, but her one attempt at organizing a WLM rally, in Buffalo, New York, in July 2016, was an embarrassing failure, with only 1-3 people showing up—but not Barnette herself.  After this debacle, she lost standing with other WLM activists. Barnette is from Tennessee, where she has been very active with the neo-Nazi National Socialist Movement. She has also had ties of varying strengths to other white supremacist groups, such as the Aryan Renaissance Society.
  • Ken Reed.  Reed, a Texan (though he spent several years in Rhode Island as a mattress salesman), is probably the most active figure in the Texas contingent of WLM.  He is one of the leaders of the Aryan Renaissance Society (ARS), a longstanding white supremacist group that dates back to the 1990s, when it was a racist skinhead group known as Aryan Reich Skins. It has also used the names White Power Liberation Front and Aryan Liberation Front. Originally based in New Jersey, ARS’s center of activity later moved to Texas, where it became something of a prison clique.  More recently, it has given itself a neo-Nazi makeover.  What has remained constant throughout is its white supremacy.
  • Doug Chism  Chism is the leader or “president” of ARS,  of which he is a long time member, dating back to its Aryan Reich Skin days.  He spent much of his membership behind bars in Texas, serving time on various convictions until 2009.  He lives in the greater Houston, Texas, area. Chism, born in 1969, is one of the oldest of the WLM activists.
  • Horace Scott Lacy.  Lacy is another ARS member from the Houston area; like Chism, he is one of the oldest WLM activists, born in 1967. Before Lacy was involved with ARS, he was a member and “special assignments major” in the large and violent Texas-based white supremacist prison gang known as the Aryan Circle. He became an Aryan Circle member in the 1990s and was still a member as late as 2009. Lacy is a felon with an extensive criminal history dating back to 1985, including convictions for possession of a controlled substance, aggravated robbery, and multiple theft charges.  He was arrested in April 2016 on aggravated robbery charges.
  • Bill Hagan (aka William Quigg).  Hagan, who publicly goes by the pseudonym William Quigg, emerged as part of California’s white supremacist scene in 2015 as the “West Coast Grand Dragon” of the Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. In February 2016, Hagan and other white supremacists organized a “White Lives Do Matter” rally in Anaheim, California, an event that received considerable media attention after insufficient police crowd control allowed left-wing counterdemonstrators to attack the white supremacists, turning the event into a bloody brawl that resulted in numerous serious injuries and multiple arrests to and of people from both sides.  Hagan also got media attention for claiming to “endorse” Hillary Clinton for president, then later claiming that he had somehow raised $20,000 in donations for Clinton from members of his tiny group. Hagan also has close ties to the neo-Nazi National Socialist Movement and attends many of their events.
  • Melissa Dennis.  Dennis, another Californian living in Bakersfield, is a member of the Noble Breed Kindred, a small white supremacist group. Dennis has been one of the most active West Coast promoters of WLM, both on-line and in the physical world, where she has passed out fliers and released red balloons.  She also sells WLM t-shirts and other white supremacist paraphernalia. Like Zrallack, she has also promoted “Free Matt Hale” events.

whitelives-matter-4-from-vk

Selected White Lives Matters Incidents/Events

  • September 2016: WLM flier drops by Zrallack in Connecticut. WLM members in Texas claimed to have “hand delivered food aid to Whites effected [sic] by the flooding in Baton Rouge, LA.”
  • August 2016: WLM flier drops by Zrallack in Connecticut. WLM protest in front of NAACP office in Houston, Texas.
  • July 2016: WLM flier drops by Zrallack in Connecticut. Small WLM protest in Dallas, Texas, in front of Bank of America Tower.  Failed WLM protest in Buffalo, New York.
  • June 2016: WLM flier drops by Zrallack in Connecticut. WLM flier drops in East Greenwich, Rhode Island, apparently by Ken Reed.
  • May 2016: WLM flier drops by Zrallack in Connecticut.
  • March 2016: WLM /“Free Matt Hale” flier drops by Zrallack in Connecticut. Matt Hale is a white supremacist serving a 40-year federal prison sentence for soliciting the murder of a federal judge. Many WLM activists also are vocal Matt Hale supporters.
  • February 2016: WLM/“Free Matt Hale” flier drops by Zrallack in Connecticut. Small WLM protest in Anaheim, California.
  • January 2016: WLM supporters put up handbills, apparently in Bakersville, California.
  • December 2015: WLM flier drops in various locations.
  • October 2015: WLM red balloon releases (“for Caucasian victims”) in different locations.
  • September 2015: WLM red balloon releases in different locations, plus distribution of fliers and stickers in California and Connecticut.
  • August 2015: WLM red balloon releases in different locations. Flier drops in Connecticut.
  • May 2015: Flier drop in Westport, Connecticut.
  • April 2015: Flier drop in Milford, Connecticut.

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June 24, 2016

Law Enforcement: Standing in the Line of Fire

The recent attack on the les­bian, gay, bisex­ual and trans­gen­der (LGBT) com­mu­nity in Orlando that left 49 dead and more than 50 wounded is yet another example of law enforcement standing in the line of fire in the fight against domestic extremism.

From 2009 to the present, at least 64 members of law enforcement have been shot by domestic extremists–including anti-government extrem­ists, white suprema­cists, domes­tic Mus­lim extrem­ists and oth­ers. Eighteen of those shootings were fatal. Additional officers might have lost their lives had they not been wearing protective vests or, as in the case of the Orlando attack, a Kevlar helmet.

Since January 2009, ADL has tracked 68 separate incidents (including seven so far this year) in which shots have been fired between domestic extremists and law enforcement in the United States. These inci­dents include sit­u­a­tions in which shots were exchanged between police and extrem­ists (shootouts), sit­u­a­tions in which extrem­ists have fired at police but police sub­dued the extrem­ists with­out hav­ing to return fire, and sit­u­a­tions in which offi­cers had to use their firearms to pro­tect them­selves against extremists.

The motivations that led the extremists to violence during these encounters vary. Many were simply trying to escape after police officers caught them engaged in criminal behavior unrelated to their extremist ideology. For others the encounter with police became the catalyst for violent ideological action. In some cases, violence escalated to a “last stand” situation in which the extremist(s) had to have known their actions would likely result in their own deaths. The most disturbing incidents, however, are those (like the Orlando attack) in which the encounter occurred as police responded to and confronted extremists who were in the midst of a directed and planned attack. TW-TargetsofAttacks

Fifteen (22%) of the 68 extremist encounters with law enforcement were the result of direct attacks by the extremists. In other words, these encounters started purely due to the extremist’s ideology. In six of those cases, the extremist(s) conducted planned attacks on civilians–including the LGBT community in Florida, a Sikh temple in Wisconsin, a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado, and employees of the Transportation Security Administration at the Los Angeles airport. In seven cases, the initial attack was directed at law enforcement, and resulted in the assassinations of three officers. In January of this year, an additional officer miraculously survived an assassination attempt in Philadelphia. In the remaining two cases, extremists attacked members of the U.S. military.

Since 2009, officers have encountered domestic extremists in 28 different states. Several states have experienced multiple incidents. Texas law enforcement has endured 10 of the 68 encounters (nearly 15%). In four of the Texas cases, the extremist(s) were linked to the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas or the Aryan Circle, demonstrating the state’s particular problem with large white supremacist prison gangs. In fact, members of racist prison gangs were involved in three of the seven shooting incidents which have already occurred this year—including encounters in Texas, Alabama and Colorado.

Florida has withstood the second highest number of incidents, reaching eight encounters with the addition of the Orlando attack. Colorado officials have faced five incidents, and suffered through the loss of Colorado Springs Officer Garrett Swasey. Swasey, the most recent law enforcement casualty at the hand of domestic extremists, died in the line of duty during a mass shooting by an anti-abortion extremist in November 2015 at a Planned Parenthood clinic.

Unfortunately ideological extremists continue to add to the dangers faced by law enforcement. An untold number of lives were saved due to the efforts of the law enforcement officers who confronted the 76 extremists involved in these 68 incidents. These officers put themselves into dangerous situations in order to protect and serve the communities in which they live.

 

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January 8, 2016

No Sign of Slowdown for Islamic Extremism Arrests in the U.S. in 2016

Aws Mohammed Younis Al-Janab, arrested January 6

Aws Mohammed Younis Al-Janab, arrested January 6

Two U.S. residents were arrested on Islamic extremism related terror charges in the first week of 2016 and a third allegedly committed a shooting on January 7 on behalf of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). Following record-breaking numbers of terror related arrests in 2015, these new arrests portend similarly high levels of Americans engaging in plots and other activity motivated by Islamic extremist ideology in the coming year.

Aws Mohammed Younis Al-Janab, a resident of Sacramento, California, was arrested on January 6, 2015. Al-Janab, an Iraqi-born man who had moved to Syria and then come to the U.S. as a refugee from Syria in 2012, is accused of making false statements in a terror-related investigation. Al-Janab had originally left the U.S. to fight with Ansar al-Islam, a Syrian terrorist group, between 2013 and 2014. Ansar al-Islam had been affiliated with Al Qaeda until August 2014, at which time it merged with ISIS.

Omar Faraj Saeed Al Hardan, a resident of Houston, Texas, was also arrested on January 6, 2015. Al Hardan, who entered the U.S. as a refugee from Iraq in 2009 and is currently a U.S. permanent resident, is charged with providing material support to a terrorist organization by attempting to join the ISIS and with lying in his naturalization application.

A third man, identified as Edward Archer of Pennsylvania, allegedly attempted to kill a law enforcement officer in Philadelphia on behalf of ISIS. There were at least four instances of Islamic extremism inspired violence against law enforcement officers in 2015.

The two individuals arrested were Iraqi born men of Palestinian descent who entered the U.S. as refugees. They reportedly communicated with each other regarding their extremist aspirations.

The vast majority of U.S. residents engaged in terrorism related to Islamic extremism are U.S. citizens.  Between 2009 and 2015, refugees accounted for only three percent of the U.S. residents linked to Islamic extremism.

In 2015, only 3 U.S. residents linked to terror motivated by Islamic extremism had entered the U.S. as refugees. One of the three, Harlem Suarez, entered the U.S. as a refugee when he was a child but appears to have converted to Islam and radicalized while in the U.S.; Suarez was a U.S. permanent resident when he was arrested for attempting to bomb a Florida beach in support of ISIS.

2015 also saw a spike in attempted domestic attacks. There were 18 plots discussed in total in 2015, compared to 1 in all of 2014.

78 U.S. residents in total were linked to terrorist activity motivated by Islamic extremism in 2015. A full list of the individuals, as well as extensive analysis, is available in the ADL report, “2015 Sees Dramatic Spike in Islamic Extremism Arrests.”

In October 2015, FBI Director James Comey indicated that there were 900 open investigations of suspected homegrown extremists, the majority of which are related to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). Since that time, there have been 12 U.S. residents linked to terror, at least three of whom (San Bernardino shooters Tafsheen Malik and Syed Rizwan Farooq and Farooq’s friend, Enrique Marquez) had not been monitored by law enforcement prior to the San Bernardino attack in December 2015.

 

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