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November 4, 2015 0

UK Bans White Supremacist Matthew Heimbach From Entering Country


Matthew Heimbach

Matthew Heim­bach

Matthew Heim­bach, head of the white suprema­cist Tra­di­tion­al­ist Youth Net­work (TYN), has been banned by Great Britain from enter­ing the coun­try. Heim­bach posted a let­ter from Great Britain’s Home Sec­re­tary on his Twit­ter page, which cited Heimbach’s advo­cacy of racial seg­re­ga­tion and his anti-Semitic and neo-Nazi remarks as rea­sons for the ban.

The let­ter from the Home Sec­re­tary stated that Heim­bach “should be excluded from the UK on grounds that [his] pres­ence here would not be con­ducive to the pub­lic good.” Heim­bach was report­edly plan­ning to meet with a num­ber of far-right activists at a pri­vate lunch in South­port, Eng­land this month.

Pre­vi­ously, Heim­bach has reached out to other extrem­ists in Europe in an effort to build ties abroad. In Novem­ber 2014, Heim­bach spoke at a neo-Nazi rally in the Czech Repub­lic. That year, he also met with the wife of a leader of Greece’s Golden Dawn, a neo-Nazi polit­i­cal party. He has also expressed ardent sup­port for nation­al­ists in Rus­sia and other for Russ­ian pres­i­dent Vladimir Putin.

Heim­bach has been an active white suprema­cist since 2012 when he founded the White Stu­dent Union at Tow­son Uni­ver­sity in Mary­land. Since then, Heim­bach has grown more vir­u­lently anti-Semitic and racist.  He founded TYN with Matthew Par­rott in 2013 as a way to attract young peo­ple to the white suprema­cist move­ment. TYN mod­els itself after the Euro­pean Iden­ti­taire move­ment, which focuses on pre­serv­ing white Euro­pean cul­ture and iden­tity in West­ern countries.

TYN, a small group, is mostly active on col­lege cam­puses, where the group often protests against Tim Wise, an inde­pen­dent scholar who gives speeches about com­bat­ing racism at schools and uni­ver­si­ties. TYN has also started a polit­i­cal party, the Tra­di­tion­al­ist Work­ers Party, to run white suprema­cist can­di­dates for local offices.

While Heim­bach is active with TYN, he also devotes a lot of time to net­work­ing with other white suprema­cist and hard­core racist groups in the U.S. He has been a speaker at a num­ber of neo-Nazi and racist skin­head events.

In June 2015, Heim­bach spoke at “Camp Com­radery,” a week­end event in Cal­i­for­nia filled with white power music bands and speeches by lead­ers in the white suprema­cist move­ment. He made a video of his speech at that event.  The video, avail­able here, con­tains some Nazi imagery and high­lights Heimbach’s hatred toward Jews. Dis­cre­tion is advised in viewing.

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July 8, 2015 2

White Supremacists Angry About Alleged Demise of White Race

Claim­ing that they are an endan­gered species account­ing for a mere 9% of the world’s pop­u­la­tion, white suprema­cists are react­ing with anger to what they view as soci­etal focus on cre­at­ing white guilt and hatred against white peo­ple, white her­itage and Christianity.endangered species

The hype spread­ing through their ranks warns of their “cul­tural cleans­ing” and ulti­mately “white geno­cide.” This rhetoric is not based on any new con­cepts, but there are some new irri­tants that are gal­va­niz­ing white suprema­cists and revi­tal­iz­ing their notion that with­out action the white race is doomed to extinction.

The most recent irri­tant stems from the rev­e­la­tion that racist Dylann Storm Roof, the alleged mur­derer of nine black parish­ioners at a Charleston, South Car­olina church, used the Con­fed­er­ate flag as a sym­bol of hate.

White suprema­cists are incensed over the recent nation­wide move­ment to rid pub­lic parks and build­ings, license plates, and retail stores of Con­fed­er­ate flags after the Charleston shoot­ing. One Klan group is plan­ning a July rally to protest of the removal of the Con­fed­er­ate flag from South Carolina’s Statehouse.

In addi­tion to white suprema­cists’ mount­ing frus­tra­tion over pub­lic dis­dain for the Con­fed­er­ate flag are the numer­ous peti­tions and efforts to rename dozens of parks, bridges and uni­ver­sity build­ings which are named after con­fed­er­ate sol­diers and/or Klansmen.

The frus­tra­tion over these attempts is not new. In 2013, approx­i­mately 75 white suprema­cists protested the renam­ing of three Mem­phis, Ten­nessee, parks pre­vi­ously named in honor of the Con­fed­er­acy, its leader, and a Klan leader. This protest demon­strated unusual unity among white suprema­cists with three dif­fer­ent Klan groups, a neo-Nazi group, and mem­bers of sev­eral racist skin­head groups in attendance.

Another issue dis­turb­ing white suprema­cists is their per­cep­tion of the way the media cov­ers crime. Extrem­ists believe black on white crime is under-reported com­pared to white on black crime. This view­point was recently com­pounded fol­low­ing media reports regard­ing the killing of black men by white police offi­cers, the “black lives mat­ter” move­ment, and the sub­se­quent civil unrest.

One note­wor­thy reac­tion by white suprema­cist to these media reports has been their sup­port for law enforce­ment offi­cers, which they have nor­mally with­held. In 2014, at least three Klan mem­bers attended an Impe­r­ial, Mis­souri, rally in sup­port of Dar­ren Wil­son, the police offi­cer who fatally shot unarmed black rob­bery sus­pect Michael Brown in Ferguson.

More sur­pris­ingly, due to their long stand­ing cul­tural dis­dain for police, a small group of racist skin­heads recently demon­strated for a week in May 2015 in sup­port of police in Olympia, Wash­ing­ton, after an offi­cer shot two unarmed black men.

White suprema­cists are also mim­ic­k­ing the “black lives mat­ter” slo­gan. Not only did white suprema­cist lead­ers of the neo-Nazi National Alliance and Tra­di­tion­al­ist Youth Net­work inter­rupt a May 2015 “black lives mat­ter” press con­fer­ence in Cincin­nati, but mem­bers of the Aryan Renais­sance Soci­ety dis­trib­uted “white lives mat­ter” fliers in Rhode Island and Con­necti­cut last month.

White suprema­cists believe that Amer­i­can soci­ety is espous­ing an anti-white agenda that pro­motes diver­sity and inte­gra­tion in order to insure that whites become a minor­ity. In reac­tion, they have declared that the days of fence sit­ting are over and are call­ing for whites to fight against the so-called destruc­tion of the white race.

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May 7, 2015 8

Point of Contention: A Fractured White Supremacist Take on Immigration


Richard Spencer has advo­cated for a white ethno-state

For over a hun­dred years, since the Ku Klux Klan of the early 20th cen­tury loudly pro­claimed its com­mit­ment to “100% Amer­i­can­ism,” fight­ing immi­gra­tion has been one of the most con­sis­tent hall­marks of white suprema­cists in the United States. For many, immi­gra­tion was noth­ing less than a sin­is­ter Jew­ish plan to flood Amer­ica with non-whites and thereby weaken and ulti­mately destroy the white race.

Because of strongly held con­vic­tions such as these, it is no sur­prise that white suprema­cists have so often been at the fore­front of anti-immigration activism. From Ku Klux Klan mem­bers hold­ing anti-immigration protests to neo-Nazis engaged in vig­i­lante patrols along the U.S.-Mexican bor­der to clos­eted white suprema­cists set­ting up “main­stream” anti-immigration orga­ni­za­tions, these groups have con­sis­tently been a major seg­ment of America’s extreme anti-immigrant fringes.

Yet the evo­lu­tion of the white suprema­cist move­ment in the United States reveals an inter­est­ing phe­nom­e­non. Though white suprema­cists remain united in their intense dis­like of immi­gra­tion and their belief in its alleged dan­ger to the white race, clear diver­gences of opin­ion have emerged among them about how they ought to respond—or, indeed, whether they ought to respond at all.

It may be too gen­er­ous to call them “schools of thought,” but sev­eral clear approaches to the issue of immi­gra­tion now clearly exist among white suprema­cists, each essen­tially stem­ming from a dif­fer­ent set of opin­ions on how to “pre­serve” the white race.

The dif­fer­ing approaches include:

  • Con­tin­u­ing actively to fight against immi­gra­tion by attempt­ing to mobi­lize fear­ful or angry whites using rhetor­i­cal strate­gies that include a focus on chang­ing demo­graph­ics in the United States;
  • Aban­don­ing the active fight against immi­gra­tion to focus instead on cre­at­ing white enclaves within a mul­ti­cul­tural United States, where whites could live with and sup­port each other in a sort of vol­un­tary self-segregation; and
  • Also giv­ing up on fight­ing immi­gra­tion into the United States but going a step fur­ther by cre­at­ing a sep­a­rate ethno-state for whites only—an inde­pen­dent white “homeland.”

Each of these view­points is reflected in the ideas or writ­ings of an advo­cate. Though white suprema­cists have dif­fer­ent approaches to the sub­ject of immi­gra­tion, all are ulti­mately react­ing to the pro­jec­tion that whites will become a minor­ity in the United States in the com­ing decades.

Read the full arti­cle: Point of Con­tention: A Frac­tured White Suprema­cist Take on Immigration

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