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March 18, 2015 9

Arizona Shooting Spree Suspect May Have White Supremacist Connections

After a man­hunt that lasted sev­eral hours and involved mul­ti­ple police depart­ments, author­i­ties in Mesa announced the appre­hen­sion of a sus­pect believed respon­si­ble for mul­ti­ple shoot­ings in Mesa on March 18 that killed one and injured at least five more.   The sus­pect in the shoot­ings has been iden­ti­fied by media reports as Ryan Elliott Giroux.

Ryan Elliott Giroux

Ryan Elliott Giroux

Giroux has a past crim­i­nal his­tory, includ­ing a stint in state prison.  A Depart­ment of Cor­rec­tions mug shot from his time in prison reveals that Giroux likely is or was a white suprema­cist, based on his facial tat­toos.  Giroux had the words “skin” and “head” tat­tooed on his eye­brows, while next to his left eye is a promi­nent “88” tat­too.  The numer­i­cal sym­bol “88,” which stands for “Heil Hitler” (because H is the 8th let­ter of the alpha­bet), is one of the most popular white suprema­cist tat­toos in the United States.

Giroux also has a Celtic knot­work tat­too on his chin.  Such tat­toos are pop­u­lar with white suprema­cists, though also used by others.

The shoot­ings began at a motel in Mesa around 8:45am, where two peo­ple were shot, one fatally.  The shooter went to a nearby restau­rant, where he allegedly shot a woman and stole a car.  Other shoot­ings occurred as the sus­pect tried to evade appre­hen­sion.   Mesa police offi­cers even­tu­ally tracked down and appre­hended Giroux.

The motive for the shoot­ings is not yet known.

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February 25, 2015 6

White Supremacist Gangs: A Growing Problem in Missouri

missouri-white-supremacist-gangs

Mis­souri white suprema­cist gangs

Mis­souri has had long expe­ri­ence with white suprema­cists rang­ing from neo-Nazis to the Ku Klux Klan, but in recent years a new threat has emerged in the Show Me state:   white suprema­cist prison gangs.   Some states have been plagued by such gangs for years, but until recently, Mis­souri had only a lim­ited expe­ri­ence with them.

Now, how­ever, there are a num­ber of white suprema­cist gangs active in Mis­souri, typ­i­cally emerg­ing in pris­ons and jails, then expand­ing onto the streets. These gangs com­bine the crim­i­nal know-how of orga­nized crime with the big­oted ide­ol­ogy of hate groups.

Law enforce­ment has been increas­ingly con­cerned about the spread of such gangs in Mis­souri. Unfor­tu­nately, recent events have jus­ti­fied that con­cern. On Jan­u­ary 26, 2015, a mem­ber of the South­west Honkies gang, Joshua Lee Hagood, shot a Spring­field police offi­cer in the head while police were inves­ti­gat­ing a sus­pi­cious van. The offi­cer sus­tained career-ending injuries. This was actu­ally the sec­ond offi­cer shoot­ing in Spring­field related to the gang. In 2013, Honkies mem­ber Mar­tin Potts wounded another offi­cer dur­ing a shootout before offi­cers fatally shot Potts.

Police have not been the only Mis­souri­ans at risk. In Feb­ru­ary, two South­west Honkies mem­bers, Aaron Williams and Austin Pierce, were charged with a hate crime after allegedly threat­en­ing to kill an African-American woman and her chil­dren while try­ing to break into her house. In Jan­u­ary, a mem­ber of the Joplin Honkies received a seven-year prison sen­tence for assault and aban­don­ing a corpse.

Gangs like the Joplin and South­west Honkies are grow­ing in Mis­souri. Accom­pa­ny­ing that growth is increased crime, typ­i­cally tra­di­tional crimes like home inva­sions or drug-related crime (gangs are often involved with the metham­phet­a­mine trade). Crim­i­nal gain tends to trump white supremacy, but gangs can engage in hate-related vio­lence, too. Gangs often embrace a cruder form of white supremacy than neo-Nazi or Klan groups, but have larger memberships.

There are five main white suprema­cist gangs oper­at­ing in Missouri:

  • Sacred Sep­a­ratist Group (SSG): The Anti-Defamation League first encoun­tered the SSG in 2005, but it has grown con­sid­er­ably in recent years. Like some of the other gangs, it orig­i­nated in the West­ern Mis­souri Cor­rec­tional Cen­ter. ADL has iden­ti­fied mem­bers of this fairly large gang from all over Mis­souri. SSG mem­bers have asso­ci­ated with mem­bers of all the gangs listed here.
  • Joplin Honkies: The Joplin Honkies orig­i­nated behind bars around the same time as SSG. Orig­i­nally, mem­bers called them­selves the Joplin Boys. The Honkies are con­cen­trated in south­west Mis­souri, espe­cially around Joplin and Spring­field.   The ADL has iden­ti­fied dozens of active mem­bers of the Joplin Honkies, but their true num­bers are higher. Off­shoot gangs include the South­west Honkies and the 417 Honkies.
  • Peck­er­wood Mid­west: Mem­bers of this gang have been iden­ti­fied in both east­ern and west­ern Mis­souri, as well as across the south­ern part of the state (Spring­field to Cape Girardeau). ADL has iden­ti­fied at least 34 mem­bers and asso­ciates of this gang, though again, actual num­bers are con­sid­er­ably higher.
  • Fam­ily Val­ues: Fam­ily Val­ues is a smaller gang and not all mem­bers are hard­core white suprema­cists (some even asso­ciate with non-whites). How­ever, a num­ber of iden­ti­fied mem­bers do use com­mon white suprema­cist sym­bols such as swastikas, SS bolts, 14 and 88. A num­ber of gang mem­bers live in or around St. Louis and Springfield.
  • Aryan Cir­cle (AC):The Aryan Cir­cle is not native to Mis­souri but to Texas, where it is one of the largest white suprema­cist prison gangs. It has expanded into a num­ber of other states, recently mov­ing into Mis­souri largely as a result of recruit­ment from Indi­ana and gang mem­bers from fed­eral prison who returned or moved to Mis­souri. ADL has iden­ti­fied at least 23 active mem­bers and asso­ciates of Aryan Cir­cle in Mis­souri, espe­cially in north­east Missouri.

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November 19, 2014 0

Don’t Hand the Bigots Another Victory

By Abra­ham H. Fox­man
National Direc­tor of the Anti-Defamation League

This arti­cle orig­i­nally appeared in The Huff­in­g­ton Post

 

For more than three decades, white suprema­cist and for­mer Klans­man Fra­zier Glenn Miller Jr. wore his hatred on his sleeve — some­times literally.

But now that he has traded his swastikas and Klan regalia for an orange prison jump­suit, one would have hoped that his record of hate­ful venom against Jews and other minori­ties would have been safely sequestered — and silenced — behind bars.

Not quite.

Miller, cur­rently await­ing trial on cap­i­tal mur­der charges in the April 13 shoot­ing ram­page out­side of a Jew­ish Com­mu­nity Cen­ter in Over­land Park, Kansas, is not one for hold­ing back his vir­u­lent anti-Semitic beliefs.

When asked why he car­ried out the attack — which killed physi­cian William Cor­poron, 69, and his grand­son, Reat Under­wood, 14, out­side of the Jew­ish Com­mu­nity Cen­ter, and Terri LaManno, 53, an occu­pa­tional ther­a­pist vis­it­ing her mother at a nearby senior cen­ter — Miller told The Kansas City Star that he was moti­vated both by his deeply held con­vic­tion that Jews must die and a sense of his own immi­nent mortality.

He had recently been admit­ted to the emer­gency room with emphy­sema and felt his life was com­ing to an end.

“I was con­vinced I was dying then,” Miller said in the Star’s exclu­sive inter­view pub­lished online Sat­ur­day. “I wanted to make damned sure I killed some Jews or attacked the Jews before I died.”

“Because of what I did, Jews feel less secure.”

Though Miller intended to kill inno­cent Jew­ish civil­ians, the tragic irony of his hor­rific crime is that he suc­ceeded in killing no Jews. Miller, 73, fired indis­crim­i­nately at any­one who crossed his path. Those sense­less deaths ter­ror­ized not only the Jew­ish com­mu­nity, but every­one in the greater sub­ur­ban Kansas City area — and beyond.

Miller did not wait for trial to con­fess his crimes, choos­ing instead to tell his story, laden with anti-Semitic tirades in the media rather than a judge or jury. The Kansas City paper devoted more than 2,500 words to a jail­house inter­view with Miller.

In the inter­view, Miller proudly described how he care­fully planned the shoot­ings, vis­it­ing the sites days ahead of time and cov­er­ing his tracks on the Inter­net so that law enforce­ment would be thrown off by his actions. And he rehashed his life story as a career bigot.

Miller rel­ished the effect he thought his vio­lence would have on the Jew­ish community:

“Every Jew in the world knows my name now and what I did. As for these… white peo­ple who are accom­plices of the Jews, who attend their meet­ings and con­tribute to their fundrais­ing efforts and who empower the Jews, they are my enemy too. A lot of white peo­ple who asso­ciate with Jews, go to Jew­ish events and sup­port them know that they’re not safe either, thanks to me.”

These sen­ti­ments are indeed shock­ing, but not sur­pris­ing to any­one who has fol­lowed his sor­did career of out­spo­ken big­otry. As early as 1985, Miller told ABC World News Tonight that, “now every­where I go peo­ple are agree­ing with me that the Jews do in fact con­trol this country.”

While the pub­lic has a right to know what moti­vated Miller, is there a need to give him an open micro­phone for those views? Many of these details would have come out dur­ing the trial. Why do we, as a soci­ety, feel the need to stare so long and so hard at the haters and big­ots among us?

Per­haps we should be look­ing in the mirror.

I, for one, was dis­ap­pointed with the Star’s deci­sion to give so much atten­tion to Miller and more dis­ap­pointed that it allowed him to spew his hatred. And I am annoyed and angry at the prison offi­cials who so read­ily made him avail­able to speak at length in a series of phone inter­views to a journalist.

Pub­li­ciz­ing Miller’s hate-filled tirades do not serve a com­mu­nity still emo­tion­ally bat­tered by his self-serving vit­riol. The Jew­ish com­mu­nity, the Cor­poron and LaManno fam­i­lies and the entire Greater Kansas City region can cer­tainly live with­out more of Miller’s hate speech.

More than a decade ago, Louis Far­rakhan, the anti-Semitic and racist leader of the Nation of Islam, was invited to appear as a guest on NBC’s Meet the Press. At the time I remem­ber being sur­prised that any respectable news pro­gram would give some­one with such deep ani­mos­ity toward Jews and oth­ers a plat­form where he could sell him­self as a mod­er­ate leader.

I appealed to the great Tim Russert, the host at the time, not to give Far­rakhan a plat­form on the network’s pres­ti­gious Sun­day news pro­gram, argu­ing that his sta­tus as a racist and a bigot made him a pariah and a poor sub­ject for an inter­view. The appear­ance went ahead, but not with­out Russert ask­ing pointed ques­tions about Farrakhan’s his­tory of hatred toward Jews.

Years later, after a series of hate-filled anti-Semitic speeches in which he has ful­mi­nated against Jew­ish power and blamed Jews for every­thing from pro­mot­ing the African slave trade to con­trol­ling Hol­ly­wood, Far­rakhan has achieved the sta­tus of a true out­cast. I hope that no legit­i­mate, main­stream news out­let would give him a voice.

The same rule should hold true for the anti-Jewish big­otry of Fra­zier Glenn Miller Jr.

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