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April 7, 2015 115

Right-wing Terror Attacks in U.S. Approach 1990s Levels

Recent ter­ror­ist attacks, plots and con­spir­a­cies by right-wing extrem­ists in the United States are approach­ing the level of attacks in the mid-1990s when the Okla­homa City bomb­ing occurred, based on a chronol­ogy of such attacks com­piled by the Anti-Defamation League.  The chronol­ogy was released as part of ADL’s com­mem­o­ra­tion of the 20th anniver­sary of the April 19, 1995 Okla­homa City bombing.right-wing_plots_attacks_1995-2014

The list of right-wing attacks and attempted attacks chron­i­cles 120 dif­fer­ent inci­dents between Jan­u­ary 1995 and Decem­ber 2014, illus­trat­ing a steady stream of domes­tic ter­ror inci­dents in the United States stem­ming from extreme-right move­ments over the past two decades.  Tar­gets included eth­nic and reli­gious minori­ties, gov­ern­ment offi­cials and build­ings, law enforce­ment offi­cers, abor­tion clin­ics and their staff, and others.

Exam­ined over time, the attacks illus­trate the two major surges of right-wing extrem­ism that the United States has expe­ri­enced in the past 20 years.  The first began in the mid-1990s and lasted until the end of the decade.  The sec­ond surge began in the late 2000s and has not yet died down.

Dur­ing both surges, the num­ber of right-wing ter­ror attacks and con­spir­a­cies out­num­bered those in the inter­ven­ing period.  From 1995 through 2000, 47 inci­dents occurred, while from 2009 through 2014, 42 inci­dents took place.  The eight-year inter­ven­ing period of 2001-08 pro­duced 31 attacks.  The surge of recent years has not pro­duced a two-year period with as many inci­dents as the years 1995–1996, which had a high of 18 attacks, but it has come close, with 16 attacks for the years 2011-12.

When ana­lyzed on the basis of per­pe­tra­tor ide­ol­ogy, the list shows that the var­i­ous white suprema­cist and anti-government extrem­ist move­ments have pro­duced the vast major­ity of the right-wing ter­ror­ist inci­dents over the past 20 years, with 50 each.  Anti-abortion extrem­ists come in third place with 13 incidents.right-wing_terrorism_by_movement_1995-2014

Inci­dents on the list include ter­ror­ist acts and plots by white suprema­cists, anti-government extrem­ists, anti-abortion extrem­ists, anti-immigration extrem­ists, anti-Muslim extrem­ists, and oth­ers.  The list does not include spon­ta­neous acts of vio­lence by right-wing extrem­ists, such as killings com­mit­ted dur­ing traf­fic stops, nor does it include lesser inci­dents of extrem­ist vio­lence or non-ideological vio­lence com­mit­ted by extremists.

Some inci­dents had per­pe­tra­tors who adhered to more than one ide­o­log­i­cal move­ment; in such cases, the move­ment that seemed most impor­tant to the per­pe­tra­tor was used for cat­e­go­riza­tion.  Cat­e­go­riza­tion was by per­pe­tra­tor ide­ol­ogy rather than type of tar­get, a fact impor­tant to note, as dif­fer­ent move­ments some­times chose the same type of tar­get (white suprema­cists and anti-abortion extrem­ists both tar­geted abor­tion clin­ics, for exam­ple), while some per­pe­tra­tors chose tar­gets that did not closely tie in with their main ide­ol­ogy (such as anti-abortion extrem­ist Eric Rudolph tar­get­ing the 1996 Atlanta Olympics).  The 2001 plot by the Jew­ish Defense League to attack Muslim-related tar­gets in Cal­i­for­nia is not listed, as ADL includes such inci­dents under Jew­ish nation­al­ist extrem­ism rather than right-wing extremism.

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March 30, 2015 326

White Supremacists Protest Against Purported “White Genocide”

White suprema­cists in loca­tions across the United States recently took part in demon­stra­tions, leaflet­ings, and indi­vid­ual acts of protest to pro­mote an increas­ingly pop­u­lar con­cept within the white supremacy move­ment: the notion of “white genocide.”

Doggett at Starbucks

Doggett at Starbucks

The Anti-Defamation League tracked inci­dents in at least 11 states, includ­ing Alabama, Arkansas, Ari­zona, Cal­i­for­nia, Ken­tucky, New Jer­sey, North Car­olina, North Dakota, Ten­nessee, Texas, and Vir­ginia. Activ­i­ties also occurred in other coun­tries, includ­ing Aus­tralia, Canada, France, Great Britain, Hun­gary, and New Zealand.

All actions took place on March 21, 2015, a date white suprema­cists have for sev­eral years declared to be “White Pride World Wide Day.” Described as part of the “March against White Geno­cide,” the actions were orga­nized and pro­moted by Fight Wide Geno­cide, a self-described “col­lec­tive of…activism” led by white suprema­cist Laura Fitzger­ald, who is based in the Colum­bia, South Car­olina, area.

The term “white geno­cide” is a rel­a­tively recent phrase coined by white suprema­cists to describe one of their long-held con­vic­tions: that the white race is “dying” due to non-white immi­gra­tion and “forced assim­i­la­tion.” White suprema­cists com­monly claim that Jews are behind this “geno­ci­dal” action.

Fitzger­ald, the cam­paign orga­nizer, is a dis­ci­ple of Robert Whitaker, an elderly guru in the white suprema­cist move­ment. His fol­low­ers have coined what they term the “Stop White Geno­cide Mantra.” Fitzger­ald encour­aged white suprema­cists to par­tic­i­pate through demon­stra­tions, post­ing “#WhiteGeno­cide” stick­ers in pub­lic loca­tions, hold­ing up ban­ners at high-traffic loca­tions, or hand­ing out literature.

A few white suprema­cists even tried to exploit Star­bucks’ recent “Race Together” diver­sity cam­paign. Ron Doggett, a long­time white suprema­cist based in Rich­mond, Vir­ginia, and sev­eral oth­ers demon­strated out­side a local Star­bucks, hold­ing up a “Diver­sity = White Geno­cide” ban­ner and other white suprema­cist signs and plac­ards. Doggett is a for­mer sup­porter of David Duke, as well as Fra­zier Glenn Miller, the sus­pect in the 2014 fatal shoot­ings of three peo­ple at Jew­ish insti­tu­tions in Over­land Park, Kansas.

Another white suprema­cist posted on-line a photo of a cup of Star­bucks cof­fee with “‘Race Together’ is a code word for WHITE GENOCIDE” writ­ten on the sleeve.

Most demon­stra­tions and actions were small in scope. The largest occurred in Flo­rence, Ken­tucky, where 10–15 white suprema­cists led by neo-Nazi Robert Rans­dell car­ried a “‘Diver­sity’ = White Geno­cide” ban­ner and waved white suprema­cist flags and placards.

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March 18, 2015 9

Arizona Shooting Spree Suspect May Have White Supremacist Connections

After a man­hunt that lasted sev­eral hours and involved mul­ti­ple police depart­ments, author­i­ties in Mesa announced the appre­hen­sion of a sus­pect believed respon­si­ble for mul­ti­ple shoot­ings in Mesa on March 18 that killed one and injured at least five more.   The sus­pect in the shoot­ings has been iden­ti­fied by media reports as Ryan Elliott Giroux.

Ryan Elliott Giroux

Ryan Elliott Giroux

Giroux has a past crim­i­nal his­tory, includ­ing a stint in state prison.  A Depart­ment of Cor­rec­tions mug shot from his time in prison reveals that Giroux likely is or was a white suprema­cist, based on his facial tat­toos.  Giroux had the words “skin” and “head” tat­tooed on his eye­brows, while next to his left eye is a promi­nent “88” tat­too.  The numer­i­cal sym­bol “88,” which stands for “Heil Hitler” (because H is the 8th let­ter of the alpha­bet), is one of the most popular white suprema­cist tat­toos in the United States.

Giroux also has a Celtic knot­work tat­too on his chin.  Such tat­toos are pop­u­lar with white suprema­cists, though also used by others.

The shoot­ings began at a motel in Mesa around 8:45am, where two peo­ple were shot, one fatally.  The shooter went to a nearby restau­rant, where he allegedly shot a woman and stole a car.  Other shoot­ings occurred as the sus­pect tried to evade appre­hen­sion.   Mesa police offi­cers even­tu­ally tracked down and appre­hended Giroux.

The motive for the shoot­ings is not yet known.

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