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May 7, 2015 7

Point of Contention: A Fractured White Supremacist Take on Immigration

richard-spencer-brick-wall

Richard Spencer has advo­cated for a white ethno-state

For over a hun­dred years, since the Ku Klux Klan of the early 20th cen­tury loudly pro­claimed its com­mit­ment to “100% Amer­i­can­ism,” fight­ing immi­gra­tion has been one of the most con­sis­tent hall­marks of white suprema­cists in the United States. For many, immi­gra­tion was noth­ing less than a sin­is­ter Jew­ish plan to flood Amer­ica with non-whites and thereby weaken and ulti­mately destroy the white race.

Because of strongly held con­vic­tions such as these, it is no sur­prise that white suprema­cists have so often been at the fore­front of anti-immigration activism. From Ku Klux Klan mem­bers hold­ing anti-immigration protests to neo-Nazis engaged in vig­i­lante patrols along the U.S.-Mexican bor­der to clos­eted white suprema­cists set­ting up “main­stream” anti-immigration orga­ni­za­tions, these groups have con­sis­tently been a major seg­ment of America’s extreme anti-immigrant fringes.

Yet the evo­lu­tion of the white suprema­cist move­ment in the United States reveals an inter­est­ing phe­nom­e­non. Though white suprema­cists remain united in their intense dis­like of immi­gra­tion and their belief in its alleged dan­ger to the white race, clear diver­gences of opin­ion have emerged among them about how they ought to respond—or, indeed, whether they ought to respond at all.

It may be too gen­er­ous to call them “schools of thought,” but sev­eral clear approaches to the issue of immi­gra­tion now clearly exist among white suprema­cists, each essen­tially stem­ming from a dif­fer­ent set of opin­ions on how to “pre­serve” the white race.

The dif­fer­ing approaches include:

  • Con­tin­u­ing actively to fight against immi­gra­tion by attempt­ing to mobi­lize fear­ful or angry whites using rhetor­i­cal strate­gies that include a focus on chang­ing demo­graph­ics in the United States;
  • Aban­don­ing the active fight against immi­gra­tion to focus instead on cre­at­ing white enclaves within a mul­ti­cul­tural United States, where whites could live with and sup­port each other in a sort of vol­un­tary self-segregation; and
  • Also giv­ing up on fight­ing immi­gra­tion into the United States but going a step fur­ther by cre­at­ing a sep­a­rate ethno-state for whites only—an inde­pen­dent white “homeland.”

Each of these view­points is reflected in the ideas or writ­ings of an advo­cate. Though white suprema­cists have dif­fer­ent approaches to the sub­ject of immi­gra­tion, all are ulti­mately react­ing to the pro­jec­tion that whites will become a minor­ity in the United States in the com­ing decades.

Read the full arti­cle: Point of Con­tention: A Frac­tured White Suprema­cist Take on Immigration

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April 23, 2013 2

Hate App Targets Towson University

Update 8/2/13: A new White Stu­dent Union has formed at Geor­gia State Uni­ver­sity by fresh­man Patrick Sharp.

The increas­ing exploita­tion of easy-to-use soft­ware to cre­ate smart­phone apps by hate groups sig­nals a move into a new realm of dig­i­tal propaganda.

Some hate groups, like the neo-confederate League of the South, have pro­duced apps intended for a gen­eral audi­ence. Oth­ers, how­ever, are devel­op­ing apps with spe­cific pro­pa­ganda tar­gets in mind. For exam­ple, the Tow­son White Stu­dent Union, founded by white suprema­cist Matthew Heim­bach, a stu­dent at Tow­son Uni­ver­sity in Mary­land, has cre­ated an app specif­i­cally tar­get­ing stu­dents at the school.

Like the League of the South’s app, the Tow­son White Stu­dent Union (Tow­son WSU) app is visu­ally crude and tech­ni­cally rudi­men­tary, pri­mar­ily offer­ing a col­lec­tion of links. In the case of the Tow­son WSU app, the links lead to blogs, a group Face­book page, a Twit­ter account for the group’s orga­nizer, a Google search results page, and a YouTube chan­nel for the group.

These Android apps are not avail­able through the autho­rized Google Play web­site. How­ever, as Android apps do not need to be cer­ti­fied for instal­la­tion (unlike iPad/iPod/iPhone apps), they are read­ily avail­able through unof­fi­cial apps dis­tri­b­u­tion websites.

Years ago, tech­no­log­i­cal advances made it easy for hate groups to cre­ate web­sites with­out actu­ally hav­ing sophis­ti­cated com­puter knowl­edge or skills. As the preva­lence of wire­less devices increases and easy-to-use app cre­ation soft­ware pro­lif­er­ates, the pres­ence of this sort of smart­phone and tablet app will undoubt­edly increase.

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